Fun with Foreshadowing

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 1

Let me start by saying I love the literary device of foreshadowing and as I revise and edit, I have thought about it more and more.  Some writers are big on allusion or theme or even setting.  I commend those who frame their writing with these aspects (really, I do).  For me though, it’s about the foreshadowing threads interwoven in the framework of the plot(s) tapestry.

By definition, foreshadowing is hinting at what is to come.  This can be subtle and apparent depending on the use by the writer.  For example, a writer could use an object noticed or used by a particular early on and then have that object play an important role later on (usually in the final act or climax of the story).  One example I continually see used as an example is if you were to see a gun on a mantle or one placed in a desk drawer. It’s very likely this element could come into play to impact the outcome of the plot.

In my opinion, the two best examples of foreshadowing used effectively in an epic fantasy story can be found in Robert Jordan’s “The Wheel of Time” series and George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” series.  I know… I know…  I reference these two a lot in my blog posts and I’ll try to discuss other works in the future but for now, these are the two that I return to whenever I think of the proper and effective use of foreshadowing.

I could use examples here but I won’t because the nature of a foreshadow is to allude to something in the future, which in our current culture is notably called a “spoiler”.  I wish I could!  But I won’t.  All I can do is recommend you read these series.  The best foreshadowing in epic fantasy is usually presented in the first book and does not come to pass until the last and towards the end of the series.  Some big payoffs definitely add to the fanfare of readers.

What has happened with me in the Ravanguard series has been beneficial when it comes to these deep details.  My method for writing the series without stopping has allowed me to see where the story has gone and then as I edit and revise, I can recall a “future” event happening in book 2, 3 or 4 and go back and then see if there’s a place for foreshadowing to work.  There’s one key though: it has to make sense within the prose.  There is a balance and trust me, I do not look for spots to drop in foreshadowing just to be cheeky (well, okay, sometimes I do but those are more for the readers who are paying attention).

I think one could argue my approach to foreshadowing is somewhat cheating but I would argue it’s just fun writing.  Sometimes, these foreshadows are quite clever and subtle and sometimes they’re right on the nose.  Both are fine and my hope is that my readers would simply consider it good storytelling.  There’s a sense of intrigue to be added too because you as the reader (and I do this too whenever I’m reading a new book.  I pay close attention to details, thinking it could be a bit of foreshadowing) are more invested in the these details.  I could never be a speed reader because I fear I would miss what I love most in the writing.

Another fun aspect I’ve run into in my own writing is that I have sometimes stumbled onto a moment of foreshadowing accidentally.  Seriously!  I have been planning the story arc of one of the next books, thought of an idea for a character and been like, “Wait, didn’t this thing happen back in book 1?”.  I’ll go and check and boom!  Slap my feet and call me Chip, I inadvertently set up a foreshadowing moment!  Now, it’s probably coincidence but I actually attribute it to my advanced internal, subconscious understanding of the world and characters.  Almost as if I know it all before I should.  (I know, you’re not buying it.)  Truthfully, though, the readers will discover in due time that I have foreshadowed some things that I hope brings delight and maybe a little shock.

Any literary device used is meant to add to the enjoyment of the reading experience.  When used properly and not in abundance to the point of distraction, these practices are worth getting better at.  I definitely encourage looking for these in the books you read.  Train yourself to look for it and see if it pays off.  Happy reading!

Call to Action: See below a video of foreshadowing in popular movies.  Obviously, there are possible spoilers so here are the movies in the top ten list:

 

On This Day: The Eye of the World is Published

posted in: On This Day | 1

Hello friends!  Let me start this off by saying this is the first of a monthly blog post focused on literary figures, books, authors, artists, film, etc. that have greatly inspired me as a writer.  These will be posted on the anniversary of said honoree.

(Edit: While I know this is the day we celebrate and honor the life of Martin Luther King Jr., I’m making this little edit at this time to say he was truly inspirational and a man filled with vision and love who could see beyond to what we as a people could and should be as citizens of the United States.  Take a moment today and honor him in any way you can.)

It’s only fitting that the first post of this series honors the late Robert Jordan and his introduction to the world I fell in love with after the first page.

Granted, I know not everyone who reads this post will be in agreement or even having read The Eye of the World (Book 1 of the Wheel of Time series).  No worries!  My mission is not to convert anyone to become a follower of the Dragon (first in book reference).

As I’ve stated before, I first came across this book back in the fall of 1999 (dear lord, that makes me feel old).  The book was published back on January 16th, 1990.  I still remember going to the library before school started (yes, my friends and I were those Freshmen), sitting at the table and noticing a book one of my friends was reading.  See the image below (how could you not be intrigued?!).  For whatever reason, this book caught my eye.  I was not an avid reader to say the least.  I barely read comic books.  Yet, it was this book that captivated me and set my course to this day more than 17 years later.

 

For those uninitiated in the world of epic fantasy (sorry, if you only watch Game of Thrones, I don’t count you as a fellow fantasy nerd.  But there’s still hope!), The Eye of the World takes the reader on an adventure filled to the brim with a colorful, complex world where there are Aes Sedai, Trollocs, Gleemen, and Forsaken.  Are you looking at that list and thinking, “Uh… what?”  Obviously not if you’ve delved beyond this first of fourteen tome.

I will not be providing an Amazon worthy critique exactly or even a vast, droning summary.  No, I’d rather share how this book thrust me forward as a writer.

The Eye of the World (I’ve read it at least five times) has continued to teach me how to write an epic fantasy novel.  Robert Jordan is notorious for details.  Every person and place was vividly described in a way that once I got ten books in drove me crazy.  At that point, you know the world so well, you don’t care what color and style clothes Rand al’Thor is wearing as he sits in some manor house with its rugs and tapestries in Tear (stay with me!).  You just want the story to move forward.  As a reader, that’s frustrating but as a writer, I learned the invaluable treasure of providing details in my own writing that lends to the realism of the world I’ve created.

Now, I admit, I do not write to the level of detail Robert Jordan does in his books.  I have my own style and approach to world building but I cannot stress how much his books inspired me more than any other.  I’m so thankful for his level and commitment to detail because I learned to appreciate it as I set out to write my own books, starting back in 2003.  That’s nearly fourteen years where I learned and realized that I wanted to include details!

Stories need details.  The best ones out there include details that appeal to the senses.  If the reader cannot only see the scene on the page but hear, smell and even taste the acrid smoke on the battlefield where charred wood and bodies choke the lungs of the wailing wounded, then as a writer, I have failed to immerse my reader in the hell that’s presented.  The goal of the scene should be to make the reader’s stomach twist slightly, pulling them into the mess and chaos of a battle’s aftermath.  Even if you’ve never been involved in such a horrible place in real life, you should be able to tap into your imagination and be there.

Robert Jordan’s writing taught me far more than just the importance of detail in writing.  Setting, foreshadowing, theme, characterization, etc.  These are all areas I gained more knowledge of each time I revisited his world.  I am forever thankful for such a writer and book offered to the literary community.

Call to Action: Buy or go to your local library and find the Eye of the World (pst, you can just click on the pic above).  I encourage everyone to experience this great novel even if you’re not a fantasy aficionado like myself.  It’s worth reading just to immerse yourself in the great detailed writing.

What even is a Ravanguard? (and how my writing journey began)

posted in: Writing | 2

Hello, hello everyone!  So, I’ve been somewhat active on Twitter in the last year after creating an account back in the early days of the app.  If memory serves right, I tweeting two times before going dark up until last year.  The reason?  I’ve only recently grabbed ahold of the benefits of the social media platform.  Late bloomer (but just in that regard).

I took to merely being a spectator on Twitter prior for sports and entertainment updates to be honest, but I quickly learned after following authors I enjoy reading that there really is a place and purpose to make connections with other people who enjoy the same things I do.

If you look through my timeline, though I cannot honestly understand why you would want to trudge back through that slow crawl, you can see I’ve made comments here and there about my progress with something called The Ravanguard.  Here’s where I shamelessly plug my current project.

More than seven years ago, I wrote a half-dozen page treatment of a scene where three mercenaries are crawling through high grass to gather intelligence of a town they were tasked to scout.  Now, this writing exercise was on a pure whim one day while I should have been at work shredding or scanning or some other menial task at an entry-level job that was supposed to be training me to be a technical writer.  Hint: they delivered on an empty promise but that story is for another blog post.

So, out of sheer boredom and just wanting to write something, I had an idea birthed out of the glory pool of creativity, which I like to call the Well of Imagination (Note: working name but subject to change when something better comes along).

This is often how my ideas come.  Not out of boredom, haha, but randomly and when I least expect it.  I’m then able to create and begin to form the muscles and tissue of a greater story.  At the time of this sudden magnificent birth, I had already been working on another series that truthfully faded into disappointment.  Good thing too!

Some background first (I know, you are settling into each subsequent paragraph just yearning to get to the answer to the question posed in the title!  Or, at least I tell myself that’s why you’re still reading this thing).

I have written two books since I first started writing as a senior in high school.  Both of those ideas started in much the same way as the Ravanguard series but with a lot more blackened frustration and broken creative bones as I truthfully did not know how to write an epic fantasy book.  I only got into the fantasy genre because a friend introduced me to Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World my freshman year.  The fire was lit though and I spent the next few years ingesting as much fantasy as I could.

Those two books of my own were honest efforts though and while I would only offer up samples of those to the highest bidders, I can honestly say I learned to craft and find my voice by doing what so many established writers tell us who are novices: keep writing.

Well, I did keep writing and after those two less than acceptable tomes of inadequacy, I found myself suddenly writing a new story that developed into a world with characters I actually found had souls.  The early title of the book was called The Raven Vanguard.  A delightful 200k+ romp about a motley mix (redundancy alarm!) of grey-hearted bastards bent on making life tough for people just wanting to live a simple life.

As many other writers have experienced, things changed through the process of writing.  I’ve been writing and editing this story for over five years now and with that came a tasty title change.  The Raven Vanguard became The Ravanguard (do you see what I did there?).

In conclusion, The Ravanguard is a fantasy series currently standing at three novellas and three novels with the fourth entries of both in outline form.  My diabolical master plan is to provide the first bits of the first novella, Dim the Veil, to everyone after I’ve received feedback from my beta readers.  If any of you actually want that sooner than later, I’ll provide the contact info of said beta readers to the highest bidder!

Until then, I hope I’ve provided you all with some well-deserved background.

Call to Action: What’s your favorite fantasy-based book/movie/video game antagonist?  And why?