Wordiness:  Too Many Too Few

As I revise, I am becoming more aware of the things I do wrong as a writer.  Some of this is chalked up to my first draftiness (ah, fun word play) but as I work on my fifth revision, I have to consider my growth and maturing as a writer.  Today, let’s talk about my being too wordy.

First drafts (in my experience) are serious word vomit sessions where I seem to just pour it on and on because I’m still telling myself the story.  That’s what first drafts are: the writer telling the story to themselves first.  Each subsequent draft of the story should be less of this.  Those drafts need to be approached with the attitude of, “Now I know what the story is so I need to whittle it down for others.”  When I use the word “whittle”, I do not mean to dumb it down.  Far from it, since I believe when revising, the story should be sharpened.  Each sentence should be put to the whetstone until there’s a fine edge.  No burrs or dullness.

For myself, I am revising my book to the point where I am making sure redundancy and over-description are being removed.  I am looking weak verbs like: are, was, is, etc.  Why say someone is running when saying they ran or rushed is stronger?  I am looking for word flow.  As I mentioned in my previous post about word count, I can honestly say my book is not lacking in the word count department, but to cut away the fat is necessary.

C.S. Lewis said, “Don’t say it was delightful; make us say delightful when we’ve read the description. You see, all those words (horrifying, wonderful, hideous, exquisite) are only like saying to your readers, ‘Please will you do the job for me.’”  This and other quotes about writing and being a functional wordsmith continue to linger in my mind.  Writers should strive to evoke and stir the emotions of the readers, remembering to show them what is happening in the story.

Call to Action: Newsletter plug time!  If you haven’t signed up for my newsletter, definitely do so.  Not only will it have exclusive info about myself since the last newsletter and some book reviews, but you will also get the Shoals to the Hallowed short story that will close some gaps and provide context to the flash fiction series.

Keeping Track: Importance of a Glossary

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 0

Since I’ve started to focus on revising “So Speaks the Gallows”, my blog posts seem to be centered around that process and things I’m encountering along the way.  That should narrow into specific topics from time to time or at least I hope it does.  Obviously, some specifics will be avoided or omitted for the sake of keeping details under wraps but hopefully the main points of what I’m blogging about will come through.

I know I’ve mentioned it before but my wife has repeatedly expressed amazement and awe (the latter is more my word than hers, lol) that I am able to construct a diverse and enriched detailed world that I’ve spent a great deal of time developing and getting just right.  World building has its merits along with adventurous intrigue, but I would be remiss to say its a simple exercise of the creative mind to keep track of everything.

As much as I love world building, a greater aspect of doing so is recording and keeping a detailed file of everything specific to my fantasy world.  Now, when it comes to the main characters, some supporting characters, and their descriptions, I could throw those out easily.  Even places, cultural details, magic-related items, etc., I can describe those in length and thoroughly.  However, there are smaller aspects I cannot for the life of me always remember.

What was the name of that village/town by that small river where my main character interacted briefly with a traveler whose name I can’t remember and they drank wine from a vineyard and ate a type of cheese whose names allude me…  You get the picture.  Not everything can be stowed away and plucked to the forefront of my memory.

Detailed notes are best kept in a separate file I’ve titled Master Glossary.  It’s this file that has saved me lots of time when researching and going back looking for a bit of information I’ve forgotten.  I would encourage all fantasy writers to do this but somehow I believe they already do.  If they didn’t in the beginning, they definitely did once they had a couple of beta readers point out embarrassing mistakes.

I mention this for today’s blog post because I’ve been trying to polish up my Master Glossary as I’ve gone about revising SStG.  Unfortunately, and I know this set me back some hours, I haven’t even begun to include the many characters, places, and things I’ve written for the other novellas and books rough drafts yet.  That will be quite the undertaking but necessary.

I know for a fact that agents could be very interested in book one but if my world building and tracking of this world is messy and unkempt, they could have reservations about trusting in my ability to see the story continued and wrapped up.  A glossary and detailed note taking is essential to my tightening the writing and making sure consistency is found throughout the narrative.

Call to Action:  Hmm, I don’t have a post-related CTA today to be honest.  I’ve toyed with a few things and came up empty.  So let’s go the charitable route.  If you have the chance, look to help a family member, friend, or even a stranger today.  Even if it’s offering to pay for someone’s coffee, consider doing so.  The world is ugly at times but we can still be courteous and decent despite the atrocities.

Steady Pace: Writing Action Sequences

I’ve recently worked on a long action sequence in “So Speaks the Gallows” and the effort made me think it was a good time to blog about writing action.  This is based on my own experience and in no way a “must follow” instructional.  Just some thoughts, ideas, and practices I’ve found myself able to explore over time.

Writing action scenes is not an easy endeavor to say the least.  When thinking epic fantasy, the images of epic battles similar to what can be found in the Lord of the Rings movies comes to mind.  Visualizing these sequences for the screen has its own set of difficulties (see the Appendices of the movies for further detail).  For novel writing though, it’s a bit different.  The action has to be described in a way that holds and maintains the reader’s attention without inundating them with any confusing language or unnecessary details.

This is a difficult part of writing.  I did not understand this in the beginning and actually prefer smaller scenes of action than large scale warfare.  There are writers that do both very well.  Brandon Sanderson (via the notes and direction of Robert Jordan) was able to do this in the final book of the Wheel of Time series, A Memory of Light, which is a massive final battle that has so many moving parts and elements that it’s amazing to read.

For myself, action sequences need to be treated in a way that moves and does not stall.  Characters are engaged in often life and death situations and have to act in order to survive.  Their choices should reflect this and if they make a mistake, then there should be consequences.  For myself, I don’t like it when the “heroes” are untouchable.  Emotions should be tugged on throughout action sequences both in the characters and the reader.

Something I try to keep in mind while writing action is forward progress and the toll taken on the characters.  Long fights where neither side gets tired is unrealistic (unless we are dealing with superheroes and/or ridiculous fights in the Matrix).  Two guys with swords fighting to the death are not likely to last more than a few minutes.  The best training in the world does not mean the body does not lose energy and grow tired.  And if and when one side suffers an injury, that has an affect on the body as well.  Loss of blood forces the body react in a way to compensate for the wound.  This is something I personally pay attention to while writing any kind of fighting scene.

Let there be a cost.  This is sort of my mantra whenever things turn violent in anything I’m writing.  Violence is a means of entertainment we find in all mediums but we are far removed from any ideology that the good guys never lose.  It’s difficult for me to write an action sequence and write the deaths of characters I know very well after so many years with them but they are not and cannot be untouchable.  There is a difference between killing characters off for shock affect and characters dying because they were bested and/or caught in the crossfire.  This is difficult to pull off and while I could justify the killing of a character (whatever their role in the story), some readers could easily say they feel cheated by the death, arguing it was unnecessary.  It’s up to me to make it justifiable in the end.

Action should pull on the reader in several different ways.  It takes years to practice and become good at it.  My recent revision of the long sequence I mentioned previously revealed a lot about myself when I first wrote it.  Too often, I ran into paragraphs that simply did nothing to push the action forward.  These stilted moments were amateur to say the least and I am pleased with the revision.  There’s a flow–a pace–to writing these scenes and while I continue to test myself and improve, I believe I’m closer to applying my writing style and voice to these difficult scenes.

Call to Action:  So, we recently watched the movie “Baby Driver”.  I whole-heartedly recommend viewing this fine film.  Not only is it fun and original, but it does something for action sequences that is not only entertaining but strikes the creative chord (pun intended).  How?  The director, Edgar Wright, syncs the soundtrack of the film to the action.  Trust me, you’ll love it.

Word Count: Does It Matter?

posted in: Fantasy, Storytelling, Writing | 6
Often, writer’s (especially with their first book attempts) just write, trying to finish the book.  That’s the primary goal with dreams of publication on the horizon.  What happens (and this is my experience) is that writers begin to do research and find information on length of the book and how that may or may not affect the book being bought and published for the general public.

When I was younger, this terrified me because I realized that my first book was very large.  Mind you, I’ve decided to love and write epic fantasy because I like a good storytelling challenge.  Now, if you do any kind of quick searches for epic fantasy novel word count, you will find what is quite the endeavor.  Anywhere from 175K to 225K words seems an appropriate average.  This translates to several hundreds of pages both in hardback and paperback, which is quite the commitment for a reader.  It’s even more so for a publisher though who is putting up the money to pay for a wide release of what they hope will be a bestseller.

Publishers are in the book game to make money.  That has to be realized.  Agents are in the book game to make money as well.  They are looking for writers who write something they believe they can sell for a book deal to a major publisher so that the book will hit the shelves at Barnes and Noble and the virtual shelves at Amazon.  Writers are in the game to write.  Sure some look to make money but I’m of the opinion best selling writers have both the skill to write a great story that other people are willing to pay for to read, but also the ability to tell the story in a way only they can.  We’ve got it in us to put the words on the pages.

In the beginning, I wanted to write, get published, and make money.  Not much of a confession since I was 18 and had no idea what else to do with my life at that time.  Now, 32, I want to write and get published.  If I make money in doing so then that’s just an added bonus.  What does this have to do with word count, you might ask?  A lot actually because I cannot sacrifice my story for the sake of believing it can only be published by a major publisher if I get it under 125K words because that might be what the publisher prefers.

From a cost/profit position, I get it.  It’s not easy to sell a new epic fantasy book that stretches several hundred pages and expect a profit all the time.  It happens but there’s a lot that goes into the effort of the agent and publisher to get that money.

For me, I cannot get hung up on length when it comes to my book.  Is it long, yes.  Admittedly so, it is long.  But that is because it is epic fantasy.  It’s the nature of the beast.  My goal is to write, edit, revise, and polish it to the best of my abilities.  Not only that, but it needs to be the best it can be in order for an agent to believe it enough to invest their career, reputation, and time into it.  It’s no easy task but doable and I believe in my writing and storytelling abilities to reach this goal despite the word count.

To all other writers who may venture to read this blog post (are you out there?  I’m not quite sure to be honest), I would encourage you to tell the story from beginning to end as you see fit.  Be prepared to have to cut and revise if your beta readers make suggestions.  Be prepared to spend more time revising sections if an agent believes it will benefit the book, which will lead it to being sold.  If there’s a section that you disagree needs to be cut/revised for whatever reason, make an appeal and state your reason why.  Trust in yourself.

Call to Action: I’m curious to know if book readers turn away from books based on length.  Do you have a preference?

Urgency for Agency: Search for an Agent

Plans change.  Most often, they change because a previous thought or idea can be influenced by new information.

I recently listened to a Q&A with a literary agent and there were some preconceived ideas I had about the process for publishing for myself that were shattered.  This has opened my eyes and my mind to make some changes.  I’ve sat with it for a few weeks now and I’m willing to say I’ve been approaching my goal the wrong way.

While not going into the deeper specifics, I’ll simply say that I had previously planned to self-publish the first novella of the Ravanguard series and use that as a means for attracting an agent.  In my mind, this was a great idea that showed initiative and forethought.  While I think this is partly true, I think after some processing and reflection, my approach was also in due part based in fear that my writing would not be good enough to attract an agent based on the writing of book 1.

This is the kind of fear every writer deals with.  My wife is gracious enough to help convince me that it’s a fear that I do not and should not worry about.  I agree.  I believe in my writing and the story I have to tell.  I’ve simply suffered a flat tire in the journey but thankfully, the spare is on and I’m on track again.

So, my plan has shifted.  I will not pursue self-publishing “Dim the Veil”.  It still serves as a companion to the series and is canon and will likely be published in the future but book 1 of the Ravanguard series, “So Speaks the Gallows”, is the top priority from her on out.  This is the vehicle for the series and I mean to see it as the selling point for gaining an agent.

Currently, I have been moving through book 1 with a friend, who has graciously offered his time, to fine comb through the book.  Seeing as how this book is over 450 pages, it has been a long process.  However, I’ve decided to refocus my revision efforts based on the feedback and discussions and I will make this final polish before searching for an agent.

Finding an agent is a process in itself.  It requires patience.  I will likely receive rejection letters but I do believe the right agent is out there for me and it will be a person I can partner with for the future.  They don’t make money unless they successfully sell the book to a publisher.  I learned a great deal through the Q&A session I listened to and will likely listen to it a few more times just to make sure I’m fit with the knowledge needed to move forward.

My wife has actually encouraged me to look for an agent for a few years now and I fought it in an attempt to convince her my plan was the right way to go.  It’s never fun to eat crow but everything is better with BBQ sauce (hickory and sweet, not spicy).  It’s an adjustment and those are never easy to realign to but I believe now that this is the route I need to take.

While I am revising book 1, I will also be preparing my query letters for agents and making sure those are top notch as well.  It’s an art in itself.  There are some rules that stretch across the board but a lot of agents have some differences in how they want to be queried.  The list of agents is growing and I have hope that he or she who decides to invest in me is in that list.

Call to Action: Despite these changes, I will continue on as I have been.  The next newsletter is still set for an August release.  Sign up if you haven’t.  Definitely expect a bigger update on book 1 and searching for an agent at that time.  I’m going to limit how much I discuss it here on the blog (if I can).

Pressure Tester: Meeting the Content Quota

posted in: Fantasy, Flash Fiction, Life, Writing | 0

I took the Memorial Day weekend as an opportunity to conduct a little experiment.  Since I started this blog and launched my website, I knew I needed to up my game and produce content.  I knew I needed to have more of a presence on social media (Twitter primarily because of its format, features, and links to other writers).  What I didn’t know though was the amount of time this required of me.

I’ve done enough research to understand how marketing myself as a writer on the interwebz is important as I pursue my dream of publishing my stories.  The blog was a great opportunity for me to write and share.  The benefits have been great (I’ve already shared that to some extent and won’t regurgitate it at the moment).  I’ve tweeted and interacted with other writers as opportunities allowed.  Overall, the experience has been good but… To put it bluntly, I’ve run into a bit of a wall.

Let me explain (No, there is too much.  Let me sum up).  Being that active on Twitter has been time consuming.  I got into a habit where I always had a tab open to Twitter and would continually keep an eye on my feed.  I wouldn’t tweet something every hour on the hour but I tried to so throughout the day because all the research I did told me I had to be a continuous presence in addition to adding content.  Other than tweeting, my blog posts every other day have been the majority of my content.

A little vulnerability I’d like to share with everyone: it has been a bit a let down but only because I think my expectations were too high.  I get way more spam comments (all of these I have to go through and mark as spam behind the scenes of my website) and I see no real evidence that I am gaining consistent followers.  This could be for a number of reasons (everyone’s got a blog nowadays, especially writers, so I get that there are a lot of options) and the one I keep coming back to is I’m still at the beginning stages of this season of being “present”.

This is not to say I do not appreciate the comments I do receive from real people.  I love being able to read them and respond.  If I don’t respond, I apologize.  I am trying to be better about it.

Even on Twitter, I’ve come to this hovering number of followers and wonder what I’m doing wrong.  Am I tweeting the wrong things?  Am I hash tagging wrong?  Am I focusing too much on writing and not other interests I have?  If I tweeted more about sports, music, food, etc. would I risk losing the followers I do have?  These are questions I continually wrestle with and have yet to find an answer.

Please don’t take this blog post as a rant or complaint.  It’s not.  I’m processing my actions and the steps I’ve taken over the last five months of going all in.  I trust that I am very much in the early stages of this leg of the race and need to merely slow to a steady pace whereas I was sprinting and have started to hit the wall (I carbo-loaded on the Twitters).

In my mind, the experiment during the last holiday weekend was to see what it “felt” like to unplug.  I decided to step away and not have my laptop in front of me with a Twitter tab open the entire three days.  It was difficult at first because there’s this odd sense that I will miss something by not staying connected.  But then, I have to ask myself, why do I feel the need to stay connected at that level?  It was ultimately draining and I suffered from something I truly don’t want to fall under the pressure of and that’s always being connected through social media.  I can easily let my posting habits become more organic than forcing myself and putting myself on a strict schedule.

If not, then I will burn myself out.  I’ve done so in other areas and through different seasons.  Trying to constantly put out content and interact through social media is too much for me.  I have so many other interests and priorities that I don’t want to let slip away.  These “others” are what fuel me and give me joy.  Constantly tweeting and trying to come up with content that would attract readers and followers is exhausting and it’s not how I want to live my life.  What I want is to write and share the stories I have in me with the world.  Writers have done that for centuries before we ever got to this place of instant-connectivity.

This is not to say technology and our current culture of content intake is bad but I think I need to take a step back and refocus.  I can do both but I cannot sacrifice my relationships, writing, and interests for the sake of building my brand when I’m not quite there.  At least not at the rate I have been trying to.  It’s too much weight and I’ve been putting it all on my shoulders.  I think once I have “Dim the Veil” ready for release or leading up to the release, I need to step back.

Call to Action: No, I’m not going to encourage you to step away from your devices today, lol.  We get that from all over now.  While I do think it’s healthy, I want to encourage everyone to simply consider what they’re putting out there.  What’s your involvement?  What content are you pouring out?  Is it about sharing your life and being encouraging or dumping your trash for the world to see?  We should strive to be better than the negative ninnies out there.  Let’s be better.  Let’s be uplifting, honoring others wherever they are at in their journey.

The Benefits of Writing Flash Fiction

My experiment of writing flash fiction since January has been one of invaluable joy.  While it started out as a way to flex the writing muscles and provide additional/different content through the blog, it has turned into something that I believe will thrust me into a sea of possibilities in the future.

I hope you all have enjoyed the flash fiction posts at the end of each month.  The next is fast approaching and I truly enjoy writing these little glimpses into the Shoals to the Hallowed world.  (Side note: My goal is to provide several viewpoints–a new one each month–and then continue on in those viewpoints by next year.  So that means you’ll have twelve distinct viewpoints introduced this year and next year, I’ll be continuing from those twelve.)

My never delving into flash fiction was a result of not really having a platform to explore and release those kinds of stories.  The blog opened the way for me and I’m glad I took those steps.  The benefits have helped me in many regards but I want to focus on one single benefit for this blog post.

Flash fiction forces the writer to value each and every word, choosing only the ones that matter most for the current story told.  What I mean by this is, I try not to exceed 550 words in a flash fiction story.  Some that I have written over the last few months have been too long and I had to whittle those down.  Parameters aren’t always a bad thing when telling a story.

This practice forced me to pick and choose, editing finely, so that the story could be told in full without what I like to call “fluff”.  This makes the story in its glimpse form edged and to the point.  Too often when writing in larger word counts, the propensity for fluff leaks through.  I chalk this up to the desire to add detail in a first draft more for the sake of the writer, setting reminders for themselves, more so than for the readers to need at that time.

As you can probably imagine, I notice the fluff as I go through the revision process with the longer works like book 1 of the Ravanguard series.  Both good and difficult at times, I definitely struggle with knowing what is sometimes fluff and what is important to the details of the narrative (that’s the continued process of becoming a better writer).

The flash fiction stories serve multiple purposes for myself as I continue to write and gain experience.  You all are involved in the experimental process I’ve set in front of me.  I know there are other lessons I’ve learned but being able to take notice of detail in word count forces my hands (ha!) to be patient and considerate whereas in past cases I’ve acted very loose in how I frame the narrative and each scene within.

Call to Action: It may be years down the road, but I do plan on compiling all the flash fiction stories for the Shoals to the Hallowed.  I’ve even started planning and thinking about the bigger picture for the series though it may be many many years down the road.  I’m curious to know what people think so far.  Let me know because I’m interested in getting feedback.  Thanks!

The Disposition of Exposition

If there’s anything in writing fiction that needs to be done well and balanced throughout the arc of the story, it is exposition.  The inserting of background information for the sake of explaining characters, history, setting, culture, etc. is tricky for first time writers.  As with many literary devices, this is especially difficult in fantasy.

In works of fiction set in the real world, in real places, during real eras, most of us can draw from our education and/or experiences to fill in the gaps.  If I’m reading a book set in the United States during the 90s and certain people, places, music, and events are mentioned, it is very likely I’m able to draw from my time growing up in the 90s (I was born in ’84, so I’m well-aware of the decade).  Yes, I was a freshman in high school by the end of the 90s but as the years go by, I know more about the global conflicts, major historical events, sporting events, etc. (lots of etcetera’s in this blog post, right?).  I think you all get my point.

Fiction set during this era doesn’t need a lot of exposition.  If you grew up or were starting a career or nearing retirement during the 90s, then you knew the culture.  If you are reading a book (let’s say a John Grisham novel set in this time), I guarantee you don’t need much background explained on a national level.  If we are talking about Grisham’s “The Runaway Jury” then we are looking at Mississippi in the 90s.  Exposition here would focus on the setting the story takes place in and the region and those cultural nuances that would be prevalent.  That’s very little to expound upon to the readers because one would be able to presume the majority of readers in the US would be familiar with the time period, social issues, etc.

Now, let’s jump to fantasy.

In fantasy, you are being introduced to an entirely new world with its own history, society/culture, foods, religions, conflicts, and more!  One thing I’ve run into when speaking with people who are not the biggest fans of fantasy is that they struggle to immerse themselves in a world that they are so unfamiliar with, filled with ideas and things that are not explained in detail.  I get this.  So much in a fantasy world needs to be revealed in order to understand the roles and complexities of the world the plot takes place.  However, we as fantasy writers (I being one of them) run into a problem if we try explaining every new thing that is unlike something in the real world.  We slow down the action of the narrative if we do this.

The problem in doing so takes the reader out of the story and they are forced to read paragraphs of information that almost acts as a pause button.  I’ve seen fantasy writers tackle this problem of exposition a few different ways.  The first is a glossary or primer (I’m a fan of this method) that usually can be found at the back of the book where people, groups, events, etc. can be explained and defined.  The second way (I’m not a fan of this) is adding footnotes at the bottom of the page.  I have struggled reading books using this method because I always feel I have to drop my eyes to the bottom of the page when I come across that footnote letter or number within the prose.  It’s very inconvenient.  I’m curious to know how many readers prefer either method or could care less.

My preferred method in my own writing when dealing with exposition is looking for ways to explain background information either through the dialogue or inner thoughts of the characters.  The problem with this method however is that the reader has to wait for it and be on the lookout.  For example, in the “Shoals to the Hallowed” flash fiction series I post at the end of each month (I hope you all are enjoying them and my promise to create a primer is still in the works) I am giving you all very little information about the world due to lack of writing space.  Flash fiction in its desired format limits the amount of words I can provide, so my goal (and this is a bit of an exercise for me) is to give you hints of things, reinforce them from time to time in each new story, and allow you to make important connections.

It is my feeling and belief that if I just explained the Wielders and the Shoals they are able to access and harness the power of, I would be denying you the joy of the small windows of story provided.  Now, maybe that’s my own ignorance and you all are just like, “What the heck is going on here?!  Just tell me!”  If you are, there’s your call to action, hahaha!

Seriously, though, I understand the struggle to not have exposition in new, unknown fantasy worlds.  I truly do and my hope is that I can give you the answers in ways that do not slow the story or act as a distraction.  It’s my belief (and preference to be honest) to learn as I read and trust that the writer will explain things naturally without inundating me with info dumps every other page.  I’d like to think I’m not alone in that.

Call to Action: Show of hands.  Who’s completely lost in the “Shoals to the Hallowed” flash fiction stories and would like a future post or a working primer to be added to the website so some things can be explained?

Update Time!

Some quick updates.  Nothing received on the book art front yet but I know that will be coming in due time.  I heard from my friend who is helping me and things are moving forward.  There is no rush at this point simply because I think for now I’ve decided against either starting a gofundme or kickstarter option to put together the money for the “Dim the Veil” edit.

Without going into the details, I’ll just say that unless I can offer more than a “free” copy of the ebook of the novella, I don’t feel like I can justify asking people to donate or invest more than the cost of the novella itself.  Going with either of those crowd funding options would have (in my mind) required me to offer a gift/reward of equal value.  At this time, if someone decided to donate $10-20, there is nothing I can think of practically to offer in equal exchange for that amount of money.  Not at this point at least.

The downside of this is that I will not be able to get the novella edited and released in the timeframe I had originally hoped.  It will take time for me to put together the amount required to pay for both the line and copy edit.  At this point, I could not in good conscious release the novella without taking that step.  Quality is so important to me as a writer.

I’m thankful I encountered this realization and do not look at this as a defeat or setback in any sense.  I’ve been doing this long enough to know that while I’m a writer and storyteller, I am not (I wish it weren’t so) a professional fiction editor.  I’ve invested time and resources in getting better at self-editing but there is a skill set that I don’t necessarily possess in comparison to the editor, Victoria, I’ve since worked with.

I do plan on getting better though, having asked Victoria for feedback on any repetitive mistakes she may have noticed in the short story provided in the newsletter (I hope those of you who signed up and received it enjoyed the story!).  I have her redlines and comments and I will make it a priority to study and understand the corrections and changes so that I can fix any bad habits I’ve developed over the years (it happens…).

One other positive is that I will be working on the short story for the second newsletter, which will be released at the end of August for all of you!  Yay!  I will have Victoria edit that short story as well and it’s format will be different than the last.  My hope is that I can continue to offer up quality content and still learn to write more better (I did that on purpose, ha!).

Call to Action: While I won’t be starting a crowd funding option to save towards the “Dim the Veil” edit, I will be looking for an alternative way just so I can set aside money and be able to track my progress.  If for any reason you do want to invest in me and my writing, I will not turn away the compassion.  Contact me on my website and we will discuss the details.  This will be beneficial to anyone in the long run.  You will get exclusives and when I am able to, gifts worth the amount you gave.  I thank you all of you for continuing to come here and read what I have to say.  It means the world to me!

Developing Characters

Short of being able to properly and coherently write sentences, characters are by-far the most important aspects of your story.  I’ve wrote on this to some length over the last few months and wanted to get into some specifics.  This will be a post about developing characters and I’m going to do it in a way that I hope makes things fun for you the reader.  How?  Well, as I write, I’m going to develop a brand new character for you!  (This character will be in a future short story–maybe in the next newsletter!)

Have at it!

Alright, there are “aspects” I want to consider first and you’ll just have to roll with me as I do this.  I want to create a character who is distinct.  What does that look like?  Well, I need to decide a few things that will be both somewhat general and differential when it comes to others.  (Just as a heads-up, all of these characteristics we’ll be developing are subject to change but I am going to try to keep everything the same so that when you come across the character in the short story, you will feel like you know them!)

Back to the distinctity (yeah, I know, not a word but it is fun to write and say!).

Let’s say the character’s name is Avroes Toal.  That’s a random name if ever I came up with one but let’s roll with it as we move on.  What will make him distinct.  Let’s say he is younger but has early signs of graying hair, making him self-conscious with the ladies.  One lovely lady in particular (this is a bit of a plot element so we’ll leave that alone for now).  Who is this man named, Avroes?  If he’s self-conscious about his hair, how else would that affect his personality?  I imagine him as being a bit of an over-compensator.  He looks for opportunities to prove he’s not older than he is and therefore has adopted more childish or immature ways.  This also affects his relationships both personally and professionally.

How are we doing?  Are you staying with me?  Good!  Onwards!

So, Avroes Toal is a young man (mid-twenties) who has prematurely graying hair and over-compensates this by acting out in ways to prove he is young and not old.  We’ll stray away from specifics because we don’t want to get too close to plot points.  Let’s also throw in some other details to round him out.  He likes the outdoors and would prefer pursuing a profession that allows him to see the world (cliché a bit, I know), but let’s say he wants this because his father and grandfather were both men perfectly fine with living their lives as scholars, devoted to studying and page-turning.  This is not Avroes the Gray (poor guy has a nickname he hates too!)

He’s a man looking forward and beyond the confines of a study or library, wanting nothing more than to see the world and prove he is not like his father and grandfather who have paved the way for him to have a good-paying occupation that will allow him to marry, have children and carry on the Toal legacy of ink stains and paper cuts.

Also, he hates heights and the library he would have to spend all of his days in is at the highest story of a building with many stairs and no banisters.  He seizes up anytime he actually has to approach a tall staircase, afraid his footing will give way and he’ll stumble to his death.  In fact, let’s say his grandfather fell and died and his father fell and lived but became crippled by the horrible circumstance (a little too tear-jerking for you? Misery is drama, ha!) and Avroes has to take care of his father.  Even better dramatic tension!  It’s so sweet, it drips.

There are many more (is that correct grammar?) things we can do to round out who Avroes Toal is and maybe that can be explored in the short story (guaranteed it will) but this is just to show my process for creating a character somewhat on the fly.  Who are they, what do they do/want/hate/love/etc.?

Call to Action:  Anything we can add?  Seriously, throw out a detail!  It doesn’t have to be too precise and can be a bit vague.  What’s his favorite color, food, idiosyncratic ticks, bad habits, etc.?  I’ll be able to add that into the short story and you’ll be able to say you had a part in it!

No Dragons, Dwarves/Elves, or Dreams/Prophecies: Access Denied

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 0
Something I continually encounter when telling people I’m a writer and they ask, “What do you write?”, is I have this sense that they have preconceived ideas when I answer, “Fantasy”.  I can see it in their eyes.  “Oh, so dragons, elves and magic.”  Not a question but a definite statement.  To which I silently in my head respond, “I should have said fiction…”

I don’t blame people for this assumption.  I get it.  All you have to do is look at the main cultural references we have in our society.  Lords of the Rings, Chronicles of Narnia, Harry Potter, and most recent, Game of Thrones.  These big ones have set the stage and have planted the seeds one would expect from fantasy.  (Wizards, dragons, and elves, oh my!)

Unfortunately, I do not have the means or assignment to correct people on how vast and wide the fantasy genre has come since Tolkien laid the modern foundation.  I wish I could have that job, trust me! (King of Correction!  Hear me!)  Alas, I do not have that honorable title, but thankfully, I have a blog and I can voice my knowledge and experience in the genre to better help people who may not be big nerds like myself.

Three tropes or elements you will not find in my writing: dragons, dwarves/elves, or dreams/prophecies.

I’m going to dissect each of these somewhat quickly.  These are not tropes like my previous blog posts on magic but rather ones I have intentionally avoided because I choose not to employ their function in any of my stories.  None of these are intrinsically overdone in the genre and I often enjoy them when done in a new way in the books I read.

Magical creatures and or races in the traditional sense simply do not play any significant role in the worlds I’ve created.  If you’ve read any of the series I recommended in my fantasy reader’s guide post, then you know that I have a preference for worlds and stories that read more “human” in nature.  This does not mean there are not other kinds of races in these books (Stephen Eriksons Malazan series is chalk full of different races that are awesomely imagined) but there’s a bit more creativity and imagination involved.  For myself, I’ve created races that seem familiar to the reader but in the end are their own.

I’m actually not big on books or stories involving dragons as major characters and/or plot elements.  There are plenty out there but I’ve truly never been a fan.  Smaug in my mind is one of the best examples of a dragon in fantasy.  Robert Jordan does not use dragons but actually calls his savior-of-the-world main character, The Dragon, which I really liked because it called to the fantasy element instead of including it in the Wheel of Time series.

Dreams and prophecies are elements I have avoided on purpose.  I could easily throw these into the narrative of the Ravanguard series but I consciously did not because I did not like the idea of using them as a crutch, which I think some series utilize to that advantage.  These are seemingly always used as a means of foreshadowing and installing the hero as the savior to all mankind (again, a bit overdone in the genre).  I prefer to use foreshadowing without these because I find that it’s more difficult and a challenge.

George R.R. Martin actually does this very well despite his use of dreams and prophecies.  He explores foreshadowing by use of language and visuals, which is what I have tried to emulate in my own way.  In fact, if I were ever to use dreams or prophecies as a literary device, I’d probably try to do it in a way that has not been done before.

For anyone who is looking forward to reading my stories, I hope this is helpful and lays out what to expect or in this case “not expect”.  Fantasy is not restricted to these few common/popular elements.  If that’s what you like, there’s plenty of options out there!  Trust me.  The vast coffer that is the fantasy genre overflows with different worlds and subgenres that have their own mix of devoted fans.  Sometimes, I wish there was another way to describe what I write but my use of limited technology, magic and swords kind of puts me in the barrel.  That’s probably why enjoy the genre so much: it’s not constricted but goes as far as the writer’s imagination can stretch.

Call to Action: I admit, there is one series of books that involve dragons that I am interested in reading.  Naomi Novik’s Temeraire series is an alternate history fantasy that has dragons in the Napoleonic Wars.  That just sounds like a fun read.  If you’ve read it, let me know what you think!  If not, then it may be worth exploring.

Working With an Editor

I’ve just completed my first experience with an editor for the short story that will be included in the newsletter.  Just to lay out some first impressions and give some general thoughts on the process, I thought I’d share.

It’s a new experience to actually communicate with and hire an editor for their services.  It did not really hit me right away but I think I’ve been able to marinate in it for long enough now that I can actually express my joy and sweet release of held breath.  Mind you, this was just for a short story but to receive the manuscript back and see the redlines (corrections) and read the comments included is almost victorious.  Obviously, I have a long road to go.  The novella, “Dim the Veil”, is the big goal–the true launching point (more on that in a bit).  But there is this overwhelming sense of, “Wow, what just happened?  What does this mean?”

I have no satisfying answer except to say I recognize the road I’ve been walking for several years and feel I actually know the destination it leads to.  I do not measure success by signing a multi-book deal with a major publishing house.  While that would be a dream come true and very much still in my aspirations, I feel that success is writing and completing this Ravanguard series.  It started as a few pages of three characters in a tense situation and has now become a short story (with more to come; I’m already thinking about the next one), multiple novellas and just as many books.  If anything–if I am able to accomplish one thing as a writer–I want to see the Ravanguard series finished.

And I assure you, those stories will be released in one form or another.  I know the cost of editing now and while it may be a slow process, I will absolutely see them all released as ebooks.  I’ve told my wife that to hold an actual printed hardback and/or paperback book of my story in my hands would be nothing short of amazing, I have long since been willing to settle for digital formats if that’s my only option.  I’m okay with that and I know, so long as the story keeps progressing until I put that final period in place on the last page, I’ve reached my first goal.

Back to the option of starting a gofundme option for the editing price of the novella, I think I’ve been leaning in a slightly different direction.  There are plenty of options out there for crowd funding projects.  Plenty of people do it and find success.  After talking to my wife about this at length, and I think she has raised some very good points, I need to consider more than the simple funding of an edit.  There’s this question of “then what?” after I get the novella back, edited and polished, to my satisfaction.  Well, there’s this thing called marketing that I have little to no experience or knowledge in.  Apparently it’s important and requires money.  Yay…

Hahaha, I kid.  But seriously, it’s a viable and essential step.  Sure, I could post on social media that I have a novella for purchase over on Amazon but is that truly effective?  I don’t know to be honest but I have a sneaking suspicion it might not be.  So, I’m now thinking of doing a kickstarter that would actually enable me to raise the funds for launching not only the novella but my brand as a writer.  I have no interest in being hasty (words of wisdom from Treebeard if ever there were some) and I don’t want to be slow either.  This is simply more to consider and requires some additional research and preparation.  Wish me luck!

Call to Action: I recently finished a book worth reading, especially if you like witty writing that’s quite meta if you enjoy literature.  It’s called “The Eyre Affair” by Jasper Fforde.  Very good and clever.  Check it out!

Doubt and Fear

Being that April 10th was National Encourage a Young Writer Day, I have continued to think about my time when I first started writing and some of the negative thoughts I often had, believing I might not have what it takes to write something worth sharing to the world.  Some transparency is coming at you today (jab, jab, upper cut!).

What I struggled with the most early on was this belief that I could not come up with anything original.  Mind you, I was focused on epic fantasy from the start and if I were to look back on my first attempts at a story, a lot of what I wrote could easily have been clones of some other element in the books I was reading back then.  In retrospect, this makes sense to me now.  It also makes sense why I had to write two “bad” novels before I found my way to the projects I’m currently working on and excited about.

Doubt in myself was an all too familiar face I stared at or found looking my way as I would sit down and do my best while typing away.  That’s what I did: my best.  I think for young writers, they need to make mistakes and struggle along the way before they find their footing.  I have experienced this kind of grind and forming of ability in another area.  Playing drums.  Those first years had their very own level of difficulties and growing pains.  The same can be said of writing.

There were some years that I barely wrote at all because of this struggle.  I was going to school and working but as I’ve said, writing has to be made a priority in order to find success.  I’ve battled with bouts of depression and none were so bad as when I was living in Seattle going to school.  I could easily say it was because of the weather (a little cliché but there is some weight to that but strictly from a lack of vitamin c).  To be honest, I just didn’t like myself and what I was doing with my life.  I was there for school at a legit university and I struggled to find motivation to go to class just about every day.  I ate poorly, gained a lot of weight and barely slept because of horrible restless leg syndrome.  Not fun.

In all this, I kept trying to write despite not really knowing why I was writing.  I think at that time I was editing my second book, which has since been shelved and only returned to when I need a good laugh.  Trust me, it’s not good.  It was too much like trying to be something you’d find in a Final Fantasy game and honestly, it just wasn’t genuine.  I restricted myself too much because I didn’t trust in my abilities and mirrored a lot of characters and world elements to these popular games.

However, in all this I tried to find motivation and inspiration where I could.  This ended up taking the form of finding writing quotes and putting them on my bedroom wall so I could see them all the time.  One quote in particular has to this day stayed with me and really is one of the seeds that kept me going (blowing on those embers otherwise buried in ash).

“Even in literature and art, no man who bothers about originality will ever be original: whereas if you simply try to tell the truth (without caring twopence how often it has been told before) you will, nine times out of ten, become original without ever having noticed it.” C.S. Lewis

This quote from the great C.S. Lewis gave me one simple direction to set my course towards.  Truth.  Now, this does not mean I all of a sudden had an epiphany and began to change my bad habits and fix what I was doing as a young writer. Would that it were so simple (Hail Caesar!)  My wife will laugh at that one.  Bernaners.  No, I had a new adventure to take!  What is truth?  I won’t go into that long tale at this time, but I did embark on that journey and it took a few more years before I eventually began the Ravanguard series.

To finish all this up in a neatly tied bow, young writers, I implore you to not be chained down by doubt or fear.  Embrace the bad writing because then you’ll have an example of the bad to return to and know you have eventually found success.  If good writing is simply telling the truth from your perspective, then search for truth and let that be your compass (cue the cheesy after-school special music!).

Call to Action: We’re only a few days from the newsletter being sent out!  Woohoo!!!!  I have sent the Ravanguard short story, “The Vain King and Taboo Coin,” to my editor contact and it is polished up for your enjoyment.  Sign up so you can read it!

Fun with Foreshadowing

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 1

Let me start by saying I love the literary device of foreshadowing and as I revise and edit, I have thought about it more and more.  Some writers are big on allusion or theme or even setting.  I commend those who frame their writing with these aspects (really, I do).  For me though, it’s about the foreshadowing threads interwoven in the framework of the plot(s) tapestry.

By definition, foreshadowing is hinting at what is to come.  This can be subtle and apparent depending on the use by the writer.  For example, a writer could use an object noticed or used by a particular early on and then have that object play an important role later on (usually in the final act or climax of the story).  One example I continually see used as an example is if you were to see a gun on a mantle or one placed in a desk drawer. It’s very likely this element could come into play to impact the outcome of the plot.

In my opinion, the two best examples of foreshadowing used effectively in an epic fantasy story can be found in Robert Jordan’s “The Wheel of Time” series and George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” series.  I know… I know…  I reference these two a lot in my blog posts and I’ll try to discuss other works in the future but for now, these are the two that I return to whenever I think of the proper and effective use of foreshadowing.

I could use examples here but I won’t because the nature of a foreshadow is to allude to something in the future, which in our current culture is notably called a “spoiler”.  I wish I could!  But I won’t.  All I can do is recommend you read these series.  The best foreshadowing in epic fantasy is usually presented in the first book and does not come to pass until the last and towards the end of the series.  Some big payoffs definitely add to the fanfare of readers.

What has happened with me in the Ravanguard series has been beneficial when it comes to these deep details.  My method for writing the series without stopping has allowed me to see where the story has gone and then as I edit and revise, I can recall a “future” event happening in book 2, 3 or 4 and go back and then see if there’s a place for foreshadowing to work.  There’s one key though: it has to make sense within the prose.  There is a balance and trust me, I do not look for spots to drop in foreshadowing just to be cheeky (well, okay, sometimes I do but those are more for the readers who are paying attention).

I think one could argue my approach to foreshadowing is somewhat cheating but I would argue it’s just fun writing.  Sometimes, these foreshadows are quite clever and subtle and sometimes they’re right on the nose.  Both are fine and my hope is that my readers would simply consider it good storytelling.  There’s a sense of intrigue to be added too because you as the reader (and I do this too whenever I’m reading a new book.  I pay close attention to details, thinking it could be a bit of foreshadowing) are more invested in the these details.  I could never be a speed reader because I fear I would miss what I love most in the writing.

Another fun aspect I’ve run into in my own writing is that I have sometimes stumbled onto a moment of foreshadowing accidentally.  Seriously!  I have been planning the story arc of one of the next books, thought of an idea for a character and been like, “Wait, didn’t this thing happen back in book 1?”.  I’ll go and check and boom!  Slap my feet and call me Chip, I inadvertently set up a foreshadowing moment!  Now, it’s probably coincidence but I actually attribute it to my advanced internal, subconscious understanding of the world and characters.  Almost as if I know it all before I should.  (I know, you’re not buying it.)  Truthfully, though, the readers will discover in due time that I have foreshadowed some things that I hope brings delight and maybe a little shock.

Any literary device used is meant to add to the enjoyment of the reading experience.  When used properly and not in abundance to the point of distraction, these practices are worth getting better at.  I definitely encourage looking for these in the books you read.  Train yourself to look for it and see if it pays off.  Happy reading!

Call to Action: See below a video of foreshadowing in popular movies.  Obviously, there are possible spoilers so here are the movies in the top ten list:

 

Medieval Gardening Tips

Remember in my very first blog post back on January 1st?  When I said, “…I’ll be revealing more about who I am with each blog post.  Topics will include writing, books, comics, movies, video games, music, food, weather, medieval gardening tips…”  (See, I did say it.)  You probably thought I was just being sarcastic.  Well, I was but also being a little tongue in cheek with an aftertaste of meta.

The following quote comes from author, George R.R. Martin:

“I think there are two types of writers, the architects and the gardeners. The architects plan everything ahead of time, like an architect building a house. They know how many rooms are going to be in the house, what kind of roof they’re going to have, where the wires are going to run, what kind of plumbing there’s going to be. They have the whole thing designed and blueprinted out before they even nail the first board up. The gardeners dig a hole, drop in a seed and water it. They kind of know what seed it is, they know if planted a fantasy seed or mystery seed or whatever. But as the plant comes up and they water it, they don’t know how many branches it’s going to have, they find out as it grows. And I’m much more a gardener than an architect.”

I’ve written a prior post on outlining and the value of doing so in the short and long run of your writing.  I’m more of a rough outliner now than I was when I first started the Ravanguard series.  It came out of writing a minor scene found in the first book and I liked it so much, I decided to expand on the idea, developing characters and ideas until I had a general sense of where to start.

However, as I’ve been revising a lot these last couple of weeks, I’ve come back to this idea of being an architect or gardener, which is a term I heard a few years back when listening to one of my preferred Game of Thrones podcasts.  The phrase was discussed a bit and I looked for Martin’s quote.  Back to the present and I very much consider myself a gardener despite my attempts at thinking ahead and outlining subsequent books in the Ravanguard series.

I’m currently revising chapters 6-10 in “So Speaks the Gallows” (Book 1) and I’m reading through each paragraph, cutting, massaging, polishing, etc. with forethought and understanding I have now that I didn’t have back when I first wrote these chapters.  My point (and I do have one) is that I’m able to approach this revision process with a much-needed advantage I otherwise would not have had if I only tried to outline the future books.

Years ago, I had very rough ideas of where these plot arcs were heading.  Now that may sound a little chancy and reckless (it is actually) but I had enough faith in my writing to steer the story where it needed to go.  So, the gardener writing method was at full play in the beginning but as the years and subsequent books and novellas came into existence, I can now return and trim the dead branches and dig up the weeds, able to have a bit of foresight.

All of this encompasses my writing style.  I am not convinced this is the perfect way to write an epic fantasy series and I bet I could write a counterargument that even I would be convinced of.  But I cannot shake that this is my method.  I’ve worked at this for over a decade and found many things that work and don’t work, still adapting as I edge closer and closer to releasing the first Ravanguard novella to launch the series.

My medieval gardening tips are just that.  If you are a gardener more than an architect, continue to process and write in a way that works best for you.  Be careful of comparing yourself to others.  Writers are quirky folk.  Get too many in a room discussing process and method and you’ll have a real kerfuffle on your hands.

Call to Action: I’ll be pushing my newsletter throughout this month as we move closer to the end.  April 30th is the day you will be receiving the newsletter.  So if you haven’t done so (and I don’t know why.  It’s for free), please sign up when prompted on the website or go to the “Contact” form under the “About Adam” tab above ^^^  Just make sure to include your email address and in the comment section that you’d like to be added to the mailing list.

Dim the Veil Updates


For today’s blog post, I wanted to give some updates on the first Ravanguard novella, “Dim the Veil”, which will act as the launch vehicle for the series and where I’m at in the process moving forward.  Some developments over the past week are worth sharing and I feel like the more I talk about it, the more you all will be intrigued to read it once it’s released.

First, I recently reached out to a professional editor and inquired about their services.  Through some dialogue, I was able to get an idea of what to expect by a sample edit of the first two pages of the novella and I absolutely loved the feedback from the editor.  Their expertise was so impressive that I now know I need to get the novella professionally edited before I release it.  There’s a level of scrutiny involved that I miss despite being a writer and one that I cannot expect from my beta readers (whom I absolutely appreciate in every regard and love getting feedback from).  That’s not a knock but professional editors look for specifics when it comes to sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, narrative consistency, etc.  While a writer does so with a pen, an editor commits to their craft with a blade.  Ink and blood (how’s that for an image?).

Due to the cost of such services, this could potentially push my plan to release the novella later than anticipated.  My plan was to shoot for a summer release but in all reality, I could be looking at a fall/winter release.  I am okay with this because I want the novella and anything I put out there for purchase to be the best it can be.  So, expect updates on this process in the near future.  It’s not cheap, which means I’ll be setting money aside every month until I have enough to take this big leap.  However, I may consider starting a gofundme option but only if I can assure anyone who donates that they will receive some free gifts (I’ll explore this a little bit more and hopefully I can make this an option).

Update number two!  I met with my friend who has offered to create a cover for “Dim the Veil” as part of a school project.  We had a great sit down and he was able to provide a rough mock up of the cover while we met and I’m excited to see what he creates!  That old adage of “you don’t judge a book by its cover” is long dead.  We absolutely judge the quality of a book by what we see.  I do this every time I go into a bookstore.  Eye appeal draws the potential reader in and I want to have the best cover possible.

We are working to create something subtle in design (this is my preference) that captures the essence of the main character and his affiliation to the Ravanguard.  I wonder now if I can come up with something “art” related to offer if I do in fact pursue a gofundme for the professional edit.  Show of hands, who would like me to do this?  In fact, let’s make that the CTA for today’s post.

Call to Action: Who would like me to pursue a gofundme page to get the novella professionally edited?  Those who donate would absolutely be given a free download of the novella when it’s released.  Maybe…even the Prologue to Book 1 as a bonus?  Hmmm, intriguing to say the least.  Let me know by commenting!

Book Art Coming Soon


Some more news to share with everyone today.  I’ll be working with a friend who is off at college and has a project he contacted me about.  This is also my friend who helped me launch the website and blog.  Major thanks are still in order for his help.

The project involves creating art and material for book promotion.  So, we’ll be working together in the coming weeks and hopefully have some things to share and use on the website.  I’ve got lots of ideas and a style I want to pursue that can spread across my writing projects.  Getting art specifically related to the different stories and worlds of the Ravanguard, Evinsaale and Shoals to the Hallowed will be quite the task.

For the book cover, we will be focused on the first novella, “Dim the Veil”.  I’m all about subtlety and minimalism when it comes to book art.  Some of my favorite are below.  This is not to say I’ll be copying these designs but looking for inspiration.  It’s these things I wish I was versed in.  I’m always thinking I should take graphic design classes but I really don’t know if I could add that to my plate and maintain my sanity.

So be on the lookout for these developments.  I’ll also be looking at making some aesthetic changes to the website/blog.  There are some features I’ve come across on other sites that I like and want to make available on my site.

The first newsletter is still set for an end of April release.  If you haven’t signed up, I implore you to do so.  With this new development and book art project coming, it may increase the content released.  I’ll definitely be exploring a newsletter art design as part of our to do.  Bookmarks?  Would anyone be interested in a bookmark gift or a brochure that serves as a primer for any of the series I’m working on?  These are all ideas worth exploring and being able to give out to those of you who sign up.  So make sure to do so!

Your continued support helps keep me going (I’d still write and release my writings no matter what.  Let’s be honest, hahaha) but I do appreciate all the kind words and whenever I get to talk to someone about my stories.  It’s fun to share and I look forward to growing my readership in the coming years.

Call to Action:  Follow me on Twitter @adamhenderson49, Like my author’s page over at Facebook https://www.facebook.com/adamhenderson49/, find me on Goodreads.  Stay connected!

It’s Not a Rewrite…sort of


A bit of news for everyone in today’s blog post.  I realize those who come here to read my thoughts don’t necessarily want to always read “how to” posts.  I get that.  I’m still finding my stride.  However, I do have a new development for book 1 of the Ravanguard series, “So Speaks the Gallows”.  Is that name in your head yet?  I’m hoping that it and “Dim the Veil” get more and more affiliated.

One of my good friends, David, and I have been hard at work the last few months going page to page in SStG (a little acronym action for you).  This involves us meeting up once a week and going over whatever he’s read since the last time we got together.  This has been an invaluable time for me for several reasons.  David (we’ve been friends for more than twenty years, which is crazy to think about!) is an avid reader.  Not just of fantasy but all kinds of genres.  He has an amazing memory and attention to detail in what he reads, which means he’s the perfect beta reader for me.  He sees things that I as the writer and editor gloss over.  It’s sort of the problem a writer runs into after they’ve been working on a story for several years.  A new set of eyes does wonders!

Now, I’m onto my fourth draft of SStG and that means I’ve looked at all 38 chapters and 450+ pages of the story a lot.  So much so that it’s difficult to remember the smaller details.  I have a glossary I’ve kept over the years but it’s in bad need of an update.  This is extremely difficult to maintain but necessary with the scope of the Ravanguard series (remember, I have written three novellas and books set in this world with more coming.  It is expansive).  I say all of this because it’s led to a wrinkle that I need to attend to.

I added the prologue of SStG last year after not being satisfied with the way the book starts.  David had already read some of the book before I added this small insert.  As he’s continued to read the book, though, he has made it clear (and I appreciate his honesty) that my style of writing is not consistent from the Prologue to the later chapters.  I had a suspicion of this early on but wondered how much of an issue it may be.  Lo and behold, it’s evident now that I need to do a deep edit of the book.

Consistency of flow and style are essential and very important to me as a writer.  I have my own style and with anything, I’ve grown in my skill (mad skills).  As an exercise, I took the first five chapters of the book and from paragraph to paragraph, I massaged everything from details to dialogue.  I was extremely pleased with this practice and know this is my next step moving forward.  My hope and goal is to finish the entire deep edit before this summer.  Priorities take precedent (as I stated in my previous blog post about time management).

I’m bringing this to light because I want my readers to be aware of my journey and process but also because I want my writer brethren to not be disappointed if they discover their growth may force a rewrite/deep edit.  Don’t be disheartened.  Take a breath and trust in your abilities.  Don’t rush the process.  It’s more important that you write the best possible story only you can write.  Put on your gloves, lace up the boots and climb out of the dense forest that is your story.

Call to Action: Pray for me, ha!  It’s okay.  I’m not upset like I might have been ten years ago at the thought of having to rewrite my book.  If it’s about getting published one day, then I need to be willing to make this a priority.  As for the real Call to Action, consider your creative passions.  Can you think back to when it was difficult and now it all comes with ease?  Settle into that growth and be thankful you’ve grown and matured to such a degree that you are no longer struggling with the smaller things.  That’s the goal!

Best Supporting Role

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 0

For me, rich stories involve a great deal of detail, forethought and most of all believable supporting characters.  Focusing on the latter today, I’m always thinking about the characters I consider to be placed in the “support” role.  Some are bras and some are jock straps (I’ll give you a second to consider that and all the nuances entailed, lol).

Sometimes, these characters can be glossed over, especially if they serve more as place holders than actual aids to the main protagonist(s) of the story.  There are clichés (plucky sidekick or daft henchman) and we can often locate those with ease.  The best, however, are those that actually play such a role that if removed, the story arc would suffer!

Where would Frodo be without Sam?  What about Harry if any of the many supports he had were gone (not counting Hermione or Ron because frankly, they’re more quasi-protagonists than supporting)?  There are countless other examples of this that I could go into but I think you get what I’m throwing at you.

The absolute best advice I’ve come across when it comes to writing and including supporting characters is that in those characters’ minds, they are not secondary. In other words, they have their own history, experiences, virtues and vices that make up their persona.  All of these should be included and evident during their scene(s).  Obviously, you will have stories where there are nameless, stand-ins who serve a broader role, especially if they make up the collective of a population, mob or army but those that actually speak and lend action to the story must be more.

Whenever writing these supporting characters, I always envision them having qualities both in physicality and personality that are unique to them.  For example, I recently started the fourth novella of the Ravanguard series.  The main protagonist is a woman who hires the service of a somewhat ruffian type who swears, loves to gamble, but hates to drink and has an extra pinky on his left hand, which has earned him the nickname of Two-Pink Simm.  That’s the most basic description I can give (you won’t be seeing him in readable form for a few years.  Sorry.  I’m working on it) but it gives you a lot of information.  The question automatically is: Why doesn’t he drink?  What’s the story behind that?  That’s a good question to ask and one that lends depth to him that may or may not be explored.  It’s a wrinkle of character that in my mind needs to be there.

Supporting characters should also be voices of dissent, challenging the main protagonist from time to time when there’s other options not yet explored.  No “yes men”!  What’s their personal agenda?  This is something that should be at the back of our minds when reading and coming across a portion of story where the supporting character says or does something that seems a method of contention.  This doesn’t mean they are a rival/antagonist but an opposing voice.

Let’s consider our own lives.  Do you have a friend (supporting characters are often friends, maybe an acquaintance) that you love and trust but they challenge your words or actions from time to time?  If yes, then keep that person in your life!  If you have one that is the opposite (remember what I said about the jock strap type), then don’t get too attached.  I have a few friends who I know I can be honest with about all kinds of things and know that if they disagree or have another way of approaching a situation, it’s not because they want me to fail.  They want me to succeed but not be hasty or irrational.

True support lends itself in beneficial ways that does not necessarily mean they benefit from the outcome.  I hope this all comes through the way I intend.  Stories are far more envisioned when the people whose point of views we, the readers, are denied but are ones we would love to peer into the minds of!  (This is actually something I struggle with because I would love to write from the POV of some of my supporting characters from time to time.)

Call to Action: Find those supporters in your life and thank them!  Go one step further and buy them a Starbucks gift card (I fully expect a full slew to be sent to me, ha!) and let them know you appreciate them.

Identity: Theme Explored

Write what you know.  That’s what they tell you (I don’t know who they are…still looking to be honest).  For whatever the reason, I’ve struggled to really explain to people what my books are about.  Seriously.  If you asked me in person to tell you what the first Ravanguard book is about, I would struggle to do so without going into vast details in order to make sure you are tracking with me in what I consider a complex tapestry of interwoven major and minor story lines.  In short, I’ve had to narrow it down.  The book is about identity.

I’ve done this recently on a few accounts and simply saying identity helps me focus the vision.  The story follows the viewpoints of the three main characters and their struggle through identity.  All of these are explored through different methods.  One has their identity stripped away and must establish a new one, the second strives to make a name for herself in a predominantly male order, and the third (the youngest) has little knowledge of his family and their history, only to be introduced to secrets that make him realize who he is.

I like to think that you could take any of these three quick descriptions I’ve provided and apply them to a number of stories in all kinds of genres.  That’s the beauty of the theme of identity.  It is not restrictive or limited.

This is all very organic in my writing process.  I did not write these out and go from there.  No, I started with the character and their conflict and the theme of identity grew.  Imagine the smallest of frames–better yet, a bare Christmas tree.  I set it up and throughout the process of writing, editing, re-writing and editing some more, I’ve placed the ornaments, ribbon, tinsel (not just for decoration), etc. in their proper places to give the tree–or characters–identity.  Muscle and skin added to the skeleton once again.

Write what you know.  Well, much of my main point of view characters in everything I write has one underlying theme of identity.  My writing focuses on this because I truly believe individual identity is the key to success.  A character’s journey to discover/re-discover their identity and purpose in life is the quintessential most important conflict in literature (at least I think so).

So, I relate personally because I spent many years unsure of who I was, what my purpose was, etc.  Same old story…  It took time, patience and putting myself around people who saw the gold in me.  This righted much of the upside down thinking I struggled with as a young man.  Once I found what I was looking for, though, I settled within myself to be okay.  Were there things that could still use work?  Of course!

The theme of identity will likely be what I write about the rest of my life.  My hope is that this will transcend the pages and help people.  Obviously, I cannot tell every reader who they are but hopefully, through my characters, readers will find tools that make sense to them and lead them to discover what’s most important.

Call to Action: If you are struggling with identity in any capacity, I would encourage you to not lose sight or hope.  Don’t merely look for others to tell you who you are.  Do not seek acceptance or relationships because someone else thinks you should be this or that.  Ask questions.  Pursue the truth of your convictions.  These will better guide you in the long run.

Kill the Cliché, Twist the Trope: Magical MacGuffin

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 2

There are conventions in fantasy literature that we know well, maybe to a lesser degree if you’re not an avid fan or reader, but you can recognize them with ease.  You can be reading/watching a story unfold, snap your fingers and say, “That’s so and so in this story…” or “I bet that’s what’s needed to solve…”  How?  Why?  Because you’ve seen it done so much, your brain does its magic and the dots are connected, always aware and finding the patterns.  These conventions that are easy to call are often clichés or tropes.

I relied too heavily on these clichés/tropes when I first dabbled in the genre and to be honest, it was good because it helped me understand and know what I wanted to avoid later in my journey as a writer.  For today’s post, I’m going to explore another one (don’t be surprised if this becomes a monthly post-type by the way).

The Magical MacGuffin.  What’s this?  Well, it’s the One Ring in Lord of the Rings, the Holy Grail pursued by Indiana Jones or King Arthur, and/or most recently, any of the Infinity Stones in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  A MacGuffin in literary terms is a plot device pursued by the protagonist to form the basis of the plot.  Now, these devices don’t always have to be magical.  You could literally take any story (from a book, play, tv show or film) and find the MacGuffin.  It could be a goal, dream, desire, object, idea, etc.  All of these fill the role.  Honestly, I don’t have a problem with the device as a whole but in fantasy, it is (in my opinion) a cliché/trope worth avoiding.

In the second book I wrote (one that has been shelved for the time being), I actually tried to take this trope and twist it.  I asked the question, “What if the magical objects in the world suddenly quit working, forcing the societies that relied on them to deal with the resulting conflicts that would naturally ensue?”  A malfunction of the MacGuffin if you will.  Now, this is an idea worth exploring and I may still do it to a degree but on a lesser scale.  Maybe a standalone novel…  There are elements in that world that I created and quite like a lot and don’t completely want to abandon.  Hmmmmm…  Yep, you’ve read it here first.  I may have just realized I do in fact have another story to put in my queue!

Back to the topic.  I struggle to get behind the idea of a Magical MacGuffin because its played out in fantasy.  Tolkien did it the best with the One Ring.  We have a magical item that is in fact filled with the evil of the main antagonist who wants it back.  The goal of the protagonists is to take that item to the only place where it can be destroyed (which happens to be in the most dangerous place in Middle Earth) all the while having to avoid its influence and the desire of others who want to claim it for themselves.  It’s actually a very good device used by Tolkien and plays better in the story as an item to destroy rather than attain.  Kudos to the master!

What we see since then is a lot of stories that drive the plot forward with magical items being the end goal (a sword, crown, horn, bowl, knickknack or patty whack).  Once attained, it usually gives the hero the power to overcome the evil one.  There are usually obstacles that bring lessons learned and help the character grow but for me, both as a reader and writer, to form an entire plot on the magical device, just doesn’t hold my attention.  When looking for new books to read, I actually check to see if the synopsis includes a Magical MacGuffin.  If so, I set it aside.

Thankfully, there is a wave happening in fantasy literature that doesn’t rely on this particular device.  Maybe there are magical items in the world but they are not the bones to hold everything up.  In my Ravanguard series, there are things that could be considered magical but play no major significance to the overall conflict.  I do introduce something that may look the part in the early chapters but as you read, you realize I’ve twisted the expectation of the convention.  The story centers around the three main point of views and their inner struggles to cope with a world that is turned onto its side.  They must rely on themselves and those they trust in order to survive.

I should be clear and say I’m not opposed to a Magical MacGuffin entirely in a story so long as there is a twist or subversion.  Let there be a price to pay in order to use it.  The One Ring actually does this.  Using it makes the wielder dependent and a slave to it.  That’s good!  To compare, consider the Goblet of Fire in the fourth Harry Potter book.  It’s a magical item that is the goal to attain.  Why?  Harry has to because he’s in the contest but what else?  I won’t spoil the book or movie but at least there’s a twist at the end that does extend the overall saga as a whole.  This is also good!

Maybe you prefer this convention for whatever the reason.  Not a bad thing.  We’re just different and have different tastes, which is great, fine and dandy.  Hopefully, that won’t keep you from reading my books (Ha!).  Happy reading!

Call to Action: Do you prefer Magical MacGuffin’s in stories?  If so, share them with me!  I’m always curious to read other people’s preferences and opinions.  Are there any that have been twisted and subverted that you enjoyed?

On This Day: National Tell a Fairy Tale Day (US)

This a bit of a fun OTD post.  So, here in the US, it is National Tell a Fairy Tale Day.  What I’ve decided to do is give everyone here a little treat.  In my Ravanguard series, there are fairy tales or rather, “night tales” as I call them in the series.  I don’t explore them in the actual novellas or novels but they are referenced.  Hope you’ve got your coffee and cake ready while I share the tale of the “The Lamb in the Hill”.

The boy from the Prenian hills loved little but cared most for his lamb whose snowy coat never faded.  Charged by his father to watch and protect the lamb from all possible threats, the boy took his responsibility serious.  He believed if he kept the lamb safe from wolves and other predators, his father would grant him a new responsibility at the family’s farm where he would learn to sheer and spin the valuable wool.

On a day where there was nothing to distinguish itself from the rest, the boy lost sight of the lamb as it grazed upon a hill.  Fear did not find itself in the boy, having come to trust the lamb and its willingness to stay close.  As he approached the other side of the hill, a song hummed to celebrate the day, an odd fellow waved at him.  The boy rarely met others in the fields of Prenia but waved in response.

“A beauteous day is one not to forget, young lad,” the odd fellow said.

The boy did not respond at first, taking in the odd clothing of the odd fellow, garbed in trousers and shirt made of black and silver silks.  Baubles of gold glittered at the ends of his shoes, wrists and the triangular hat upon his head.  The truly peculiar thing about the odd fellow, though, was his great height, slender frame and rock-like features of his face.  What first seemed to be wrinkles were in fact rocky crags.  From brow to chin, the odd fellow’s face marked him a creature the boy did not know.

There was some sense of danger as they stood across from one another.  The boy came out of his scrutiny of the odd fellow and noticed his lamb missing.  “Sir, have you seen my lamb?  He has the whitest coat one could imagine.  Snowy and brilliant, shining in the daylight sun.”

The odd fellow scratched his chin.  “I’m afraid I’ve taken your lamb, boy, for I have been traveling a great many days.”

Tears did not cease from the boy’s eyes at the horrible reveal.  His fear induced by the realization that his father would surely punish him both by word and hand.  The lamb was his to protect and he failed before he had known there was a problem.

The odd fellow took notice of the boy’s distress and quickly felt the need to repay for his misdeed.  These were his ways unlike some of his misguided kin.  “Good lad, do not cry,” he pleaded, “for I have a rare and magnificent gift.  I can find the greatest of treasures in the earth.  Come and see!”

The boy stood in place, heart broken but watching the odd fellow scan the earth of the hillside at their feet for several seconds.

“Aha!” the odd fellow exclaimed.  He dropped to his knees and with ease placed his hands into the earth like he was dipping his fingers into the water of a lake.  Out his hands came and in them he held a great sword.  It was unlike any other.  Old but gleaming made by a long-dead blacksmith.  “Here,” the odd fellow said, sword extended.  “Take it and you will cast down great enemy hordes with a single strike!”

The boy did not dare take such a weapon for he did not trust the odd fellow.  “Sir, I am untrained.  How could I face a rival but fail to control such a heavy blade?”

The odd fellow considered the sword.  “I see you are frail in the ways of a warrior.  I agree and will offer another gift.”  The odd fellow placed the sword on the ground, stood and roamed until he dropped to his knees again.

A second time, the odd fellow pressed his hands into the earth as if it was cream, easy to separate and search through.  His hands came out again and he held in his hands a flute of ivory.  The odd fellow brought it to his lips and blew the excess dirt from its core.  “Here,” he said.  “Take it and control the clouds above, able to bring rain or sunshine whenever you need it!”

The boy did not take the flute.  “Sir,” he said, “I am untrained.  How could I learn the notes to control the weather and make better my days?”

Once again, the odd fellow felt a blow to settle his debt.  He laid the flute down and looked all around the hillside.  “Boy,” he confessed, “I am at a loss.  What do you require to be satisfied by my misdeed?”

The boy considered the question and found only one answer to satisfy his desire.  “Surely, sir, you did not take my lamb for its coat.  Surely, you can give me that at least so I can return it to my father.  At least then, it can be woven and sold so that our investment will not go wasted.”

The odd fellow rubbed his pointed chin.  “A fair request.”  He turned to where the boy had first laid eyes on him and reached into the earth.  Out came his hands and in them he held the lamb, the animal shaking but alive as its coat was dark from the earth.

“That is not my lamb,” the boy said.  “For that one is not white.”

The odd fellow shook his head and searched all around him with the lamb in his arms.

In the moment of opportunity, the boy took up the sword and swung its mighty blade, cleaving the head of the odd fellow, having saved all his strength to make one attempt at the creature.  The lamb fell to the ground and ran to the boy, snowy coat smeared with the dirt of the earth.

The boy walked over to the flute, hummed as he always did and played notes until the clouds formed overhead.  Rain fell and washed the lamb clean.  The boy considered the body of the odd fellow and left it to wither, serving always as a reminder that the lamb could not be left out of his sight.

Call to Action: What’s your favorite fairy tale?  Post a comment and share!

Status of Projects

posted in: Writing | 0

My friends!  Thank you for coming and reading.  You all are amazing and the continued support is hands down so encouraging.

I wanted to talk a bit about where I’m at with all of my projects and provide some clarity.  This comes because of some questions I’ve been asked recently and I think this is the best place to share to give everyone an idea of what I have on my plate (three courses, desert and coffee!).

I have three “working” projects that are all at different stages.  One of my two smaller projects is my standalone novel, “Evinsaale”, which is probably a quarter of the way written.  It’s a smaller project but one I like to go back to from time to time.  It has the potential to be more than one book but I might simply write short stories based on the world.  I haven’t decided yet.

The other project is my “Shoals to the Hallowed” series which is a bit more experimental.  I’ve developed much of the world and its aspects and even written a few viewpoint chapters for a first book as a practice exercise to see if it’s something I could put more time into.  The experimental side of it is to write flash fiction for it set thirty years before the events of the first book.  Think of it as providing back story in snippets–glimpses so to speak.  You all will get those flash fiction posts every month.  Now, I know these could be hard to follow.  It’s a vast world with a lot of stuff that might not get definitions or fleshed out much.  What I’d like to do is provide a primer on the website.  That should be coming soon.  I just need to write all that down and make it available.  Definitely provide me feedback on these flash fiction posts.  If something’s unclear, let me know.  It’s an experiment and I’m okay with learning from my mistakes.

My main project is the Ravanguard series.  Much of my writing focus (aside from this blog, hahaha!) narrows into this place.  My plan from the beginning was to release a novella before each major book.  The novella’s would always be released as ebooks as a sort of bonus for those who enjoyed the series and also given as a prize between each of the main books.  One of the big issues I’ve seen in the market for readers is that the wait between books is long.  Readers read faster than writer’s write.  That’s just the way of it unfortunately.  I recognized this early on and that’s why I decided to write as much of the whole series as possible in order to avoid this long break.

Just to give an idea of the scope of the series, here’s the list:

Dim the Veil: A Ravanguard Novella – currently being read by beta readers, awaiting feedback

So Speaks the Gallows: Book 1 of the Ravanguard series – currently being edited

Untitled second Ravanguard Novella – currently being edited for beta readers

Untitled Book 2 of the Ravanguard Series – currently in rough draft form

Untitled third Ravanguard Novella – currently in rough draft form

Untitled Book 3 of the Ravanguard Series – currently in rough draft form

Untitled fourth Ravanguard Novella – currently being written

Untitled Book 4 of the Ravanguard Series – currently being outlined

Whew!  So, as you can see, I’ve written a lot and I am hard at work moving forward with this series.  I wish I had titles to share with all of you but until I decide and cement it into place, I have only working titles.  However, those will be announced in due time.  I cannot say for sure how many books there will be but judging by the story’s progress and the current states for each major viewpoint, I estimate that there will likely be 6-7 books total with just as many novellas.

All in all, I’ve got my work cut out for me.  My plan is to release “Dim the Veil” this year (hopefully in the summer) on Amazon.  I will then give that enough time to percolate in the fantasy spectrum and pursue an agent, which ideally would lead to a publisher.  This is not a fast process.  To be honest, if I manage any sort of wide spread notoriety (never guaranteed) before I hit 40, then I will count it as a huge professional success.

Call to Action: Go back and read my first flash fiction post and comment if you dare with a critique.  Recommend it to your friends!

I’ll Take My Hero Rare

posted in: Writing | 0
Last week I talked about what I want to see in villains.  Now, it’s time for the heroes (equality all around!).We are drawn to heroes like a fat kid is to the pudding tub at a buffet.  Once identified and if impacted, you cannot be pulled away from the story.  Readers pick up a book and quickly scan the back cover to learn the name of the hero (protagonist for you layman’s)  and the conflict they’re facing.  Sometimes these are simple and sometimes you have to read it ten times to make sure you understand what the book offers.  (Side note: Writing a back-of-the-book blurb is ridiculously tough when it comes to epic fantasy…not fun.)

This inevitably leads most people to buy or not buy the book (at least it does me).  We can search and gravitate to those noble men and/or virtuous women but I have come to find as I go from book to book that I no longer want the dragon slayer, righteous lawyer, uncorrupted politician or moral secret agent.  Dullsville…  No, I want the alcoholic knight, the self-conscious attorney, shady lawyer or divorced/manic-depressant jerk of a cop.  Why?  Simple.  Because they’re interesting!

A flawed hero does the one thing and has the potential that the squeaky clean, always smelling like aftershave hero doesn’t.  They can grow.  What I mean by this is these kinds of heroes with faults have all the potential in the world to not only be self-aware of their shortcomings but they can learn from them and actually do what we do in real life.  Mature and learn from mistakes.

Now for some “about me” time: I admit, I’m not all that fond of who I was when I was younger.  I took myself way too serious, struggled with relationships due to lack of identity and self-confidence, and was just a butthead who had little self-control when it came to my emotions (always working on these things by the way).  Now that may make you crap your khakis if you know me today, but I know there are people I spent time with in my past that I was less than kind to due to my insecurities and if given the opportunity, I would apologize to them for my actions and words.  How come I can recognize this and be transparent about my shortcomings?  Well, I matured.  I grew up, had a found Jesus season (not moment or day–a whole season!), and I am able to recognize what I did wrong in my youth.

This is exactly what I want in a hero!  Even if they do not fully understand the mistakes they made or see their vices, I want to read about their revelation and then see their transformation take place from chapter to chapter.  Self-aware protagonists just make for a better read.  Show me the shady lawyer in a situation that would only further his douche-holery but when he recognizes that he’s been down that road before, he chooses the opposite route!  Let that choice actually determine whether or not he could face jail time and I’ll be slow-clapping all the way to the end of the book.

It’s about character.  A three-dimensional character can be virtuous (I’ll not argue that) but no person is completely perfect and blameless.  Well, I concede, there was this one guy.  But let’s stick to the fictional ones for the time being.  When there’s an actual cost or possibility that the hero could be injured or beaten, we as readers are so much more invested in the story.  That’s why George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” series is captivating to readers.  He subverts the hero cliché on multiple occasions.  The first book, “A Game of Thrones”, actually follows the traditional trope of an epic fantasy but by the end, he turns everything on its head and you, the reader, cannot help but stare at that page (you know which one I’m talking about) and be peeved, shocked and even anxious to read on, hoping Martin was just messing with you.

I decided when I started the first book of the Ravanguard series, “So Speaks the Gallows”, that I wanted the hero(es) to be flawed.  I have three main point of views in the book and each of these protagonists are flawed in their own way based on their experiences and prejudices against the world.  The main character of my Evinsaale book is an addict and that’s revealed in the first few pages and plays an important role throughout the story.  I write these characters in these ways because I must.  I’ve written heroes in the trope-woven cloak of righteousness and virtue and I could never find their story worth telling in the long run.

Again, a flawed hero captivates the reader because you do not know what they will do in any given situation.  The unknowing is what keeps us turning each page, which is the only goal of a story–to get from start to finish.

Call to Action: Go back through books/movies/tv shows that you like.  Are the heroes/protagonists squeaky clean?  Maybe you prefer them that way and that’s fine.  Sometimes, I’ll admit, you need a hero that walks on water from time to time but consider the opposite.  Respond with a comment about the ones you love or hate.  Let’s talk about them!

So Far so Good: Review and Reflection

posted in: Writing | 0
My friends, I’m a month into this blogging thing and I admit, I was unprepared for how much writing it would require of me (cue the long exhale) but I will say that I have enjoyed it immensely.  Blogging forces my hand (pun) to keep things moving in a way that I was unaware of for quite some time.  Seriously, I thought I worked on my writing projects at a decent rate seeing as how I have a full time job, wife and other responsibilities that I devote my life to.Well, I’ve learned several things and I’ll go ahead and share them here.

If you’ve paid attention to the details, I try to have a new blog post every other day for all of you.  While I am wondering how long I can sustain this schedule in the long term, I think it’s been very beneficial to me to do so for no other reason than I am writing.  I will not be writing solely about writing topics (theme, setting, characterization, etc.) because I don’t want to spin those wheels all the time.  I have added some different themed posts to hopefully shake up the monotony.

Quick overview: “On This Day” will be once a month and focus on something related to the literary world or in close relation.  Books, authors, films, etc.  All will be explored.  These will likely be a little longer in word count but worth it since my hope is they provide you with my personal inspiration and history regarding them.

Flash Fiction:  Okay, now I’ve had some questions about these and I want to clear up some things.  These will likely be once a month but possibly twice (depends on how generous I’m feeling) where you all will get glimpses into the world of another series I’ve spent some time developing.  It’s not as fleshed out as the Ravanguard series but the flash fiction stories posted will develop and introduce you to the world of my Shoals to the Hallowed series.  This is a vast undertaking but a great exercise and experiment for myself.  All of these will take place in the same world and timeline.  They are meant to be independent events from a wide array of characters, cultures, settings and situations that make up and tell the story of the world years prior to the first book’s events.  These are the prequel to book one.  (Note: Keep in mind, this is separate from the Ravanguard completely.  Just a way for me to share my writing style and stories with all of you.)

Sunday Levity: These are short and fun.  My Sundays are often busy with church and family events.  I don’t have a lot of time here (though I might now because football has ended) and as I’ve stated in my recent blog post about the social climate of the US, I need levity from time to time.  I imagine you do too and my Sunday Levity posts are meant to be lighter.  They will be filled with puns, sarcasm and nerd culture laughs.  If it makes me laugh, it will be shared.

Next, I want to say thank you to all my family, friends and strangers who come by and read what I have to say.  I’ve received kind and encouraging feedback so far and I hope to continue to provide quality content in the future.  Please do not forget to comment.  I’m always happy to answer questions or clarify anything.

Lastly, I need to make a change to the newsletter.  I’ve been working on the content for the first one and I’ve looked ahead and realized that four a year is unlikely.  I am dropping it to three (one every four months).  So, please sign up for it when prompted on the website if you haven’t done so yet.  The first will be released at the end of April and will include a Ravanguard short story recently written just for all of you!

Call to Action: Sign up for the newsletter of course and if you have the chance, share my posts from my Facebook author’s page.  Some have done this already and I so appreciate the vote of confidence and help.

Quarter-turn Style Guide: A Newsletter

posted in: Flash Fiction, Newsletter, Writing | 2

Afternoon, my friends!

I apologize for the bit of redundancy in my first few blog posts.  I’m finding my groove (like Kuzko not Stella).  Thanks for returning!

Todays’s post will cover my plans for a newsletter (yes, this a bit of a sales pitch to get all of you to sign up for it.  Don’t judge).  That means I have to make it worth your while.  What follows will be my early thoughts for the content offered.

1. Introduction

This will be pretty standard with maybe a pic or two to showcase life in the Mojave Desert or events I participated between Jan and March.  Probably some fun facts just so you can get to know me a little better.

2. Current Status of Projects

You’ll get an up-to-date status of all of my current projects.  The Ravanguard is the primary work in progress but I have others that I’ll be working on from time to time.

3. Ravanguard Backstory

I’d love to get some background details out to my readers.  The world of the Ravanguard is immense and explored in such a way through my writing that is not all at once but almost a slow burn.  By the end of Book 3, much of its borders are revealed but with a few more surprises (I don’t give the whole cow for free).  The key to this will be to be spoiler free.  Once I release Dim the Veil (Novella 1), I can loosen the draw strings  a bit.

4. Currently Reading and Recently Read

This will direct you to my goodreads profile where if you want, you can see what I’m reading.  I’d like to provide some top picks and recommendations in this section as well.  I’m not practiced in critiques or reviews of other works but I may put myself to the test.

5. Flash Fiction

Here’s the juice.  Fresh and sweet.  I will be providing some flash fiction writing that does not make the blog.  I have some ideas I’m mulling around and will experiment with but I’d love to do a flash fiction series that gives you glimpses into a shared world with fresh characters.  Most of all, this will serve as an example of my writing.  These stories will more than likely be fantasy in genre but there could be surprises from time to time.

6. Conclusion and Call to Action

More standard things here but with some extra goodness to top off the newsletter.

Call to Action: Sign up for the newsletter!  It’s free!

No Resolute Absolute

posted in: Writing | 0

2017 is here!  I’m thirty-two and cannot for the life of me understand how I feel the same as I did when I was in my younger twenties.  Sure, I’m more refined and mature than when I was skipping class at the local community college and putting myself on academic probation but I truly feel amazing and look forward to this new year!

Goals and plans.  That’s what I want to discuss and sort of put my hands into for today’s post like a wet clay that needs molding.  It’s truly easy to lose track of the year and let it moan by while I simply give it a jaunty wave and then I’ve got 2018’s starting line ahead of me.

As a writer, I absolutely believe in setting goals–believable goals.  I’ve learned since my early days not to say some nonsense like, “I will get an agent and get a six-book deal with TOR by the end of this year.”  Not a healthy goal.  However, if TOR somehow comes across this post and gets their hands on the manuscript for book one of the Ravanguard series, I am available to discuss and negotiate the contract today.  If not, then I’ll go back to my realistic, healthy goals.

This website is finished and in it’s infancy.  That’s a 2016 goal that has come to pass.  I’ve given the first Ravanguard novella to multiple beta readers and even received some very valuable feedback.  That’s a goal met!  Huzzah hooray!  For 2017, I need to establish some new goals.  Hopefully by placing them here, I’ve got all of you to help me and keep me accountable.  If we’re fast approaching December 2017 and I’ve done nothing but entertain all of you with this blog, then I fully expect and invite some hyper-encouraging comments to kick me into gear.

What are my goals for this new year?  It’s truly simple.  Release the finished first novella of the Ravanguard series to all of you in e-reader format for free.  Now this is something that could happen quickly.  It all depends on how much feedback I get from my beta readers.  You all will have access to a sample of the first pages soon.  When that happens, I will make the announcement.  I’ll celebrate and give myself a high five and sip a little Glenmorangie 10 yr single malt to commemorate the achievement.  It’ll be a good day.

Another goal I will be setting is to continue to bring you all new blog posts.  I have a vague idea of what I want this blog to be if not just the medium for which I can talk with all of you.

For my plans, I am thinking of not only keeping strong with the rest of the Ravanguard series since that is a constant but I’d like to work on some other projects when I need a break.  I have a stand alone fantasy novel I’ve worked on and would like to probably provide some sample material for that to all of you as well.  Maybe just to get some feedback.  I have an idea of how I want to do that but I’ll wait and see.

Aha!  Another goal I just thought of.  I am on goodreads and love that site.  I set a reading goal for myself last year to read 25 books.  I surpassed that quickly because I read about 3-4 books at a time.  I like to give myself options and not be bogged down by one book (I know the arguments against that approach and we’ll thumb wrestle over who’s sillier to think one way is better than the other).  I read two physical books and listen to two audiobooks at a time.  My method of madness (Oh, band name!).  So, my new goal for the year is to do 50 books this year.  And good for all of you, I will be sharing my thoughts of each book finished here!  What I’d also like to do, is get book recommendations from all of you too.  I’ve tried hard to add books that are not fantasy to my queue but struggle finding good ones so I invite you all to help me out in that regard.

Let’s see…  I can’t think of any other goals or plans to share so I’ll leave it at that for now and sign off.  You all are amazing!  Thanks for starting this journey with me and make sure to leave comments and follow me on Twitter at @adamhenderson49

Call to Action: What’s the last book you read and hated?

What even is a Ravanguard? (and how my writing journey began)

posted in: Writing | 2

Hello, hello everyone!  So, I’ve been somewhat active on Twitter in the last year after creating an account back in the early days of the app.  If memory serves right, I tweeting two times before going dark up until last year.  The reason?  I’ve only recently grabbed ahold of the benefits of the social media platform.  Late bloomer (but just in that regard).

I took to merely being a spectator on Twitter prior for sports and entertainment updates to be honest, but I quickly learned after following authors I enjoy reading that there really is a place and purpose to make connections with other people who enjoy the same things I do.

If you look through my timeline, though I cannot honestly understand why you would want to trudge back through that slow crawl, you can see I’ve made comments here and there about my progress with something called The Ravanguard.  Here’s where I shamelessly plug my current project.

More than seven years ago, I wrote a half-dozen page treatment of a scene where three mercenaries are crawling through high grass to gather intelligence of a town they were tasked to scout.  Now, this writing exercise was on a pure whim one day while I should have been at work shredding or scanning or some other menial task at an entry-level job that was supposed to be training me to be a technical writer.  Hint: they delivered on an empty promise but that story is for another blog post.

So, out of sheer boredom and just wanting to write something, I had an idea birthed out of the glory pool of creativity, which I like to call the Well of Imagination (Note: working name but subject to change when something better comes along).

This is often how my ideas come.  Not out of boredom, haha, but randomly and when I least expect it.  I’m then able to create and begin to form the muscles and tissue of a greater story.  At the time of this sudden magnificent birth, I had already been working on another series that truthfully faded into disappointment.  Good thing too!

Some background first (I know, you are settling into each subsequent paragraph just yearning to get to the answer to the question posed in the title!  Or, at least I tell myself that’s why you’re still reading this thing).

I have written two books since I first started writing as a senior in high school.  Both of those ideas started in much the same way as the Ravanguard series but with a lot more blackened frustration and broken creative bones as I truthfully did not know how to write an epic fantasy book.  I only got into the fantasy genre because a friend introduced me to Robert Jordan’s The Eye of the World my freshman year.  The fire was lit though and I spent the next few years ingesting as much fantasy as I could.

Those two books of my own were honest efforts though and while I would only offer up samples of those to the highest bidders, I can honestly say I learned to craft and find my voice by doing what so many established writers tell us who are novices: keep writing.

Well, I did keep writing and after those two less than acceptable tomes of inadequacy, I found myself suddenly writing a new story that developed into a world with characters I actually found had souls.  The early title of the book was called The Raven Vanguard.  A delightful 200k+ romp about a motley mix (redundancy alarm!) of grey-hearted bastards bent on making life tough for people just wanting to live a simple life.

As many other writers have experienced, things changed through the process of writing.  I’ve been writing and editing this story for over five years now and with that came a tasty title change.  The Raven Vanguard became The Ravanguard (do you see what I did there?).

In conclusion, The Ravanguard is a fantasy series currently standing at three novellas and three novels with the fourth entries of both in outline form.  My diabolical master plan is to provide the first bits of the first novella, Dim the Veil, to everyone after I’ve received feedback from my beta readers.  If any of you actually want that sooner than later, I’ll provide the contact info of said beta readers to the highest bidder!

Until then, I hope I’ve provided you all with some well-deserved background.

Call to Action: What’s your favorite fantasy-based book/movie/video game antagonist?  And why?

Launch Post!

posted in: Writing | 2

Welcome!  First, let me thank you for coming to my website and blog to read my thoughts on what will be a myriad of topics but will focus on what I love most: writing and storytelling.

Many of you do not know me and will be returning to this blog, which will be updated frequently, as I push forward in my endeavor to share my passion with the world.  Rather than throw out a list reminiscent of a dating profile (let’s be honest though, that’s what I’m going for: look at me, learn about me and see if we’re compatible!), I would direct you to my bio page for a quick info dump of who I am and my background.

What will you be getting from this blog?  I’d love to say you’ll be plucking away life-changing lessons that can be put into immediate practice where you will see the fruit drop right into your hands.  Alas, I’m not a miracle worker or a mage of any kind (except perhaps when I’m farming gil and XP in Final Fantasy III).  Instead, I’ll be revealing more about who I am with each blog post.  Topics will include writing, books, comics, movies, video games, music, food, weather, medieval gardening tips and most importantly: life’s lessons and wonderful kicks and pits.

This blog is absolutely meant to create dialogue with anyone who has a question, thought or opinion of the topic at hand.  I want to create conversations and honestly, learn from others who have different beliefs, backgrounds and experiences.  Hopefully, I can provide help and perspective and you can help teach me a thing or too as well.

I am currently writing my Ravanguard series and a great deal of things I’ll be sharing will hover around that and my other projects.  Content will be shared on the website and I’ll make sure to let everyone know when that is made available.  In a later blog post, I’ll be giving more nuggets for you all to enjoy about the series and my writing process.

I’ll go ahead and leave this first blog post at that and get going on the next one.  Follow me on Twitter at @adamhenderson49 and be expecting my tweet for the next post soon!