The Week of…

posted in: Life | 2

We’ve come to it then.  Even as I write this, knowing I will post this blog tomorrow, it could be the last before my baby hiatus.  I’m kind of chuckling because I don’t really have anything planned for the 6th thinking he will be here by then.  Both my wife and I are hopeful to be honest.  This waiting feels like when you’ve studied for a test and feel really good about it but you don’t actually take the test for a few more days (that old fun feeling).

I find it interesting how calm and collected I feel as we get closer.  All the reading, videos, and classes we’ve taken should account for some measure of preparedness right?  I already see him in later years, experiencing and growing in life.  To know we have a place in that guidance and in his own personal journey is quite the honor.  I think too often parents forget they are the most reliable resource a baby and child have until they can be independent.  Obviously, you do all that you can but there has to be this strange sense of separation, trusting your lessons will stretch beyond the boundaries of their childhood home.

(I did not see this post heading in this direction  Honest truth, lol.)

I’ve watched and observed fatherhood from a distance my whole life.  I’ve seen so many different kinds of dads and their “tactics”.  While I could argue the good and bad of many of those through different scenarios, I think the number one thing a father needs to be in order to be a good dad is simple: being present.  Not in the sense of being around.  Dads can be in the house and never be present.  My dad was on travel a lot growing up but he never seemed absent from the house when he was home.  He did chores and projects (doing his best to get me off my keester and away from video games) and included me from time to time.  Who’s with me that pulling weeds is the absolute worst?!  Ugh, I hate pulling weeds but I did them.  Still though, my dad was there and I could talk to him even if I didn’t want or know how to (it gets better and easier as you get older of course).

Even now, I look at my wife and our day to day and seriously have these thoughts about how any day now, it’s going to change.  Children change things between a husband and wife.  Not for the bad.  As a team, the load should never be too much for either parent.  There’s a selflessness that is expected and should be evident in both lives.  Partners to the end.  My wife and I often talk about how we make a great team and that we fit well together.  I have no fear of parenthood because she is there with me and I know she is more than capable of being a good mother.  Nothing could convince me otherwise.

I plan on this being my last blog post before my break and I want to leave you all with the notion that there is excitement and peace in our house.  Pregnancy is an amazing journey for first time parents.  We’ve had to make choices and absolutely understand the weight of the responsibility but I assure you we do not take it lightly or for granted.  The privilege we have in being a part of our son’s development and growth into a person who will impact and influence others cannot be ignored.

(Did it get a bit too heavy at the end there?  I feel like it did.  I rushed it, I know.)

Call to Action:  Send us thoughts and prayers!  We will gladly accept them!  Love you all!  And don’t forget to sign up for the newsletter.  It will be going out at the end of the month.

The Calm

posted in: Life | 0

I have to be honest today…  I’m not quite sure what to blog about.  The due date is fast approaching and I’m on high alert every day.  I know that at any moment my wife could call me at work and tell me contractions have started.  Where movies from my past will have fully deceived me, this does not mean I freak out, grab my things, and race home.  Nope, I calmly nod and forget what to do in response.

Let me gripe a bit about this deception.  The movie, Father of the Bride: Part 2, is a childhood favorite of mine.  We owned it on VHS (yep, dating myself) and my family watched it a lot.  We were big Steve Martin fans in our household (how could we not?!).  If you’re not familiar with it, Steve Martin’s character, George Banks, has to navigate through a midlife crisis when he finds out his newly married daughter (see Father of the Bride: Part 1 for more) breaks the news of being pregnant.  Shortly after, he finds out his own wife is pregnant which leads to great hilarity.  Seriously, there are some truly quotable lines to be stockpiled.

Based on the great amount of information I’ve learned about pregnancy, labor, and birth, I am rolling my eyes at what was “taught” to me about these things by movies and television shows.  I get it of course.  Conflict and drama are needed so they are manufactured for our viewing enjoyment.  As we all know though, real life follows a less scripted path.

My wife and I have a specific birthing plan and we are definitely not in a constant state of anxiety.  We’ve done the research and practical preparation necessary to make this a smooth process.  This does however put us in a state of “calm before the storm” sort of way, lol.  That storm being the day our family goes from two to three.

You can expect a similar thought towards movies and television when we get into the toddler years of our little boy.  I know all about the terrible twos but I’m an optimist by nature (always been a glass half full kind of guy).  So, I will believe, trust, and have faith that the “horror” stories are not my or my wife’s cup to bear.  Trials and difficulties are a given because there will be unforeseen things that fall in our path but nothing we can’t handle.

The calm is here but won’t last.  Hope you all have a great week!  At any moment, I could sign off for my baby blog break.

Call to Action:  I’m hoping April 1st will be the big day so please join me in my hope.  I can only begin to imagine the shenanigans that can be gotten into if my son’s birthday is April Fool’s Day.

So Long Rut!

See, it goes away sometimes faster than it comes.  The writing rut has dissipated and I’m back to feeling productive.  Unfortunately, I have been hit by a minor cold, so I’ve tired and going to bed earlier than normal.

The final touches on my current draft of my book are taking longer than expected (big shocker there).  My wife and I have been putting baby things as priority one and they need to be.  Preparing for the baby’s arrival continues to require more planning and preparation than I expected but I think it’s been good for us.  We’re making room and getting ourselves mentally prepared as well.

We started birth classes and I’ve been learning a ton.  Like, seriously, birth is more than what the movies and tv show you (another shocker, I know).  We’ve got to make a birthing plan, get furniture, clothes, and all the other baby accoutrement as well.  It’s a not a simple endeavor, which I guess doesn’t surprise me.  This little person is introduced to the world and we are tasked to make sure it survives, grows, and strengthens until it can be a self-sufficient entity.  No pressure, right?

I also had the fun experience of watching childbirth videos last week.  We are planning on doing a natural childbirth at a birthing center and after watching the differences between a hospital birth and birthing center birth, I get the appeal.  To each their own, I’m just surprised the more I learn about the process and benefits of one over the other.

So we’re a few weeks away from our new roommate’s arrival and we’re getting more and more excited.  I am preparing as best as I can for being elbows deep into diapers, vomit, and lack of sleep.  I’ve wanted kids for a long time and at 33, I’m ready to say hello to parenthood.

Call to Action:  I watched Shape of Water in my pursuit to watch the more recognized and acclaimed movies of 2017.  Yeah, I didn’t get this one.  It was a somewhat original story.  The aesthetics were probably the best part while the acting was good as well but I don’t see the Best Picture there.  Anybody else see it?  If so, help me see where I missed it.

Reading Goals for 2018

posted in: Books, Fantasy, Reading | 2

Aside from my writing and life goals for the year, I also have a reading goal.  I know I’ve mentioned it before, but I use Goodreads.com to track the books I read for the year.  It’s an amazing site and provides so much great information on books.  I can get lost looking through the recommended sections because they provide many suggestions of books that are not bestsellers or mainstream titles.

This year, I’ve dropped my goal from 50 books to 30 books.  But I don’t want to just read 30 random books.  I want to expand on the quality of books I’m reading.  No matter what, I can read fantasy.  It’s not even hard for me to find books in my preferred genre but I continue to think and encourage myself to read more outside of my comfort and preference.

Last year, I was happy to explore more contemporary fiction and biographies.  I was pleasantly surprised by some of the books I read and if you are signed up for my newsletter, you saw many of those reviewed and recommended.  (Also, you should sign up for my newsletter if you haven’t yet.)

This year, I’d like to include some classic literature into my reading.  There are tons of titles to choose from so I will have quite a few to pick through.  Whether it’s Dickens or Hemingway, I’d like to read books from eras I’m not familiar with and see what I can glean from them as a modern day writer.  What lessons can I learn?  What can I learn from their use of language?  Can I find something to implement into my own writing?  These are all viable questions and I think there’s a sense of honoring those who came before me that I’ve never taken advantage of before.  It would be a crime not to dive into the pages of the classics just because I might believe there’s nothing to be gained, which is unabashedly not true.  With a little opening of my mind, I think I can come away appreciating the history of fiction.

Call to Action: Throw a recommendation at me!  I promise you, I haven’t read much when it comes to the classics besides Shakespeare’s plays.  I’m open to everything!

Nothing to Say Here

posted in: Editing/Revision, Life, Writing | 0

Sometimes I run into a wall and struggle to write.  I don’t think it’s writer’s block.  Instead, it’s a lack of inspiration or desire to write.  This is not the first time and it won’t be the last.  For whatever the reason (one day, I’ll figure out the cause and give it a good kickin’) I look at the page whether it’s blank or full and just say, “Meh…”.

Now, I’ve come across other writers on social media who describe this similar phenomena.  It’s nice to know I’m not the only one and there are quotes upon quotes of encouraging words out there to lend a helping hand to writers struggling to do what they love.  Sometimes these words help me but sometimes they leave me unmoved.

I don’t know if there’s any sure way to push through the funk, but I’ve found that I personally need to let it run its course.  The moment of inspiration will come and I’ll feel propelled, set afire to get to typing.  Until then, though, I’ve learned to simply let myself be okay with not being the typing terror (worst super villain name ever) that I’ve been the last few months.  The mind and creative muscles need a break and I think it’s healthy to allow a little reprieve now and again.

This does affect my editing plans a bit but blogging helps me micro-stretch my writing muscles.  I’m reading and listening to music and podcasts in the meantime, hoping inspiration will come.  I also wonder if my mind is preoccupied with other things (a mere seven weeks away from our new roommates arrival!).  The goal remains the same for the year but I’m not one to think I need to lay down strict red lines (aka deadlines) to meet those goals.  Sure, sooner rather than later is important but I also need to be aware of my need to take breaks and rest in the writing process.

Call to Action:  Don’t forget to do your taxes (bet you didn’t expect that one!).

Disappointment: The Twists and Turns of Life

posted in: Life | 1

I’m sure you’ve all heard it before: “Life is full of disappointment”.  It’s like history’s first pessimist spread a virus, passed on from generation to generation.  We all get to hear the words and consciously or subconsciously accept it as truth.  Now before you think I’ve been struck by some kind of head trauma, I’m not saying disappointment is some mystic force jammed down our throats.  No, I’m saying we approach disappointment wrong.

Is disappointment inevitable?  I definitely think so but I’ve decided that I don’t want to live as if it is soul crushing when it happens.  Relationships, finances, career, society, etc.  All of these can cause disappointment in our lives.  A lot of times, it’s based on factors you can’t control or maybe choices you’ve made unaware of the outcome.  It comes and we face it.

I’m even beginning to wonder if disappointment is a reaction we’ve been “instituted” to have when life’s turns and twists take place.  If it is just a reaction similar to excitement or anger, then can it controlled?  If we have a choice in the matter, can we actually will ourselves to step back and not let the negative emotions that come with disappointment affect our outlook of the situation?

I don’t claim to have an answer (sorry, this is not a post with answers…just reflection).  What I can offer is my own battle with this.  Recent financial happenings in my life have gone in directions I did not anticipate.  I admit, I got down for a moment but I also know I can either wallow in the dust or stand and press on, in hope, believing victories will come.  It’s not always easy but doable.  If you are person of faith, then you would put that hope in God.  If not, then you would put that hope in yourself or maybe significant others in your life.  Either way, you are moving forward without letting disappointment convince you there is nothing better.

Too often we witness people we know either intimately or simply as acquaintances falter under disappointment.  Depending on the level, this can cripple dreams or make people look for help in various arenas.  My hope would be that we all stop responding to the unexpected in a way that would blind us to the opportunity to try again or make any adjustments needed to set the course right again.  For myself, I don’t want to miss the better parts of life because I convince myself something can’t be done or that I’m incapable of having an attitude and outlook that would see me above the trial.

Call to Action:  Look back at a recent disappointment (I’ve got a fresh one for myself) and seriously take a moment to examine it.  Write it all out as well and see if you can find the positive opportunities.  Sometimes we need to dissect the twists and turns to see other possible doorways.

Sunday Levity: Parenthood is Fast Approaching

posted in: Life, Sunday Levity | 0

Okay, so I was just surfing through Pinterest and found these.  I needed a good laugh and got it.

I have yet to find a way to prepare myself for the pee, poop, and puke smells I will be inundated with once the baby is here.  Maybe I should go to bars…


I need this mug as a simple reminder.  This is one thing that keeps my mind active every day.  I pray, “Dear God, please help me keep the baby alive.”

HAHAHA!  Yeah, I’m not prepared for when this starts happening.

So, I read this and lost it.  My wife was watching a video that was very much on the serious side and I had to apologize and explain why I suddenly fell into a laughing fit.  Try reading that and not using Liam Neeson’s voice in Taken.  So hard not to!

Call to Action:  Hope you all are having a great Sunday.  If you can, thank your parents for somehow maintaining enough self-control and not locking you in the bathroom for an hour’s worth of peace and quiet.

Remiss to Reminisce

posted in: Life | 2

I turned thirty-three almost two weeks ago and I’m beginning to notice something as I get older (no, this won’t be a gripe session about unwanted ear hair).  I reminisce a lot.  And I mean more than I ever have before.  I’m sure this is a natural occurrence as we age but I do it especially with my long-time friends.

Recently though, I have been doing it on another level.  First, some background.  I grew up in a heavily Pentecostal church (with a brief stint in a non-denominational one) and was indoctrinated into the 90s church pop culture.  Yes, that’s a real thing.  This came with a bevy of things like no wearing hats in the sanctuary, not being allowed to listen to secular music (but we could watch secular movies), attending youth group, Sunday School, and Vacation Bible Schools in the summer, etc.  You get the picture.  It was a community and culture centered on religious practices of following the Bible.

Now, I am not bashing this.  I can honestly say that as I’ve gotten older, I have enormous appreciation for this experience as a kid and teenager.  Those long-time friends I mentioned before are ones I met at church.  I’m forever grateful for these friendships for many reasons.  I also have an appreciation for charity, community, music (church is what got me into playing drums and remains one of my greatest passions in life), and potlucks that I otherwise wouldn’t have.

I am thrust into the pool of reminiscing because my wife and I were recently turned onto a podcast called Good Christian Fun.  This podcast explores specific topics in Christian pop culture from music to movies that I grew up very familiar with.  So many of these have been like digging through my childhood.  Side note: the podcast doesn’t try to push you towards or pull you away from Christianity.  It simply explores the things of that time and their influence.

For the last two weeks, as I listen to these podcasts, I’ve been thinking a lot about my childhood and how I have been shaped by those church experiences.  I’ll be honest, there are good and bad things.  I won’t delve deeper into that right now (maybe in the future but no promises) but it does have my wife and I exploring how we will raise our kids.  You want to learn from your mistakes and even from your successes and use that when practicing parenthood.

As I reminisce, I get the profound notion that doing so will pave the way towards helping me be a better husband, father, and person in general.  I have embarrassing stories up the wazoo that make me cringe to this day because I made decisions based on feelings or misgivings rather than knowledge and wisdom.  As a parent, I don’t want to follow that road.  Sure, there will be mistakes made along the way but I think I can avoid some by simply considering the past.

Call to Action:  Seriously, if you grew up in the church bubble in the late 80s, early 90s (I mean the days of DC Talk, Michael W. Smith, Left Behind, etc.), then you should check out the Good Christian Podcast.  You’ll laugh and shake your head many a times as you hear the references.

To Doubt is to Progress


Let’s dive in.  As I get closer to finishing my recent revision of So Speaks the Gallows, the creeping whispers of self-doubt interrupt the process.  These are not words of castigation but instead subtle pricks of critique that make my hands pull away from the keyboard and seriously consider the words on the page.

Revising is difficult.  You think just writing a full novel is hard, try going back over what you’ve spent years shaping and being excited about and then questioning why entire sections come across as borderline tissue paper in strength.  You wish it was more than single ply but instead, you get this thin sheet that could disintegrate at the first sneeze.

No, I have not given up and I have not put my toes over the ledge to look down into writer’s oblivion.  (It would take a lot for me to reach that point of disappointment.)  I think I’ve simply come to a section of the book where I’m not impressed with the writing (granted it’s my writing).  I know I am more than capable of girding up the paragraphs and dialogue where it suffers most but I find myself wondering about the strength of the writing as a whole.

What if the beginning is strong but it begins to wane and lose its clout the further we go to the right towards that back cover?  It’s an honest question and, I think, a natural one to explore.  Maybe it’s strong enough in the beginning to hold up any weaker sections.  Maybe an agent will get to these weaker sections and say, “Well, this needs to be reworked but I think you’re more than capable of doing it.”  These are the questions that like to poke at my confidence each time I return to revise.

As I’ve said, I’m okay with rewriting entire chapters (I actually did rewrite the first five chapters and feel they are extremely strong now) but I wonder if I should do it now or simply try to fix the weaker prose as is.  Either way works to be honest.

All this is to say doubt is a very natural and, I think, healthy emotion to go through as an artist.  For me, it keeps me in check and forces me to look back at certain sections of my book and ask questions like, “Can this be better?”  Most of the time the answer is a big fat “Yes!” and so I need to be willing to strip down the prose and rework.

So to any of my fellow artists who lay awake or stare blankly at the page or canvas, do not become bitter or agitated.  Embrace the pain of being mediocre (only at times, not always) and let creativity fizzle and reset.  I have no idea if this is sound or good advice but I know it works for me.

Call to Action:  Here’s a fun exercise to consider when in doubt, ask some simple questions and answer as truthfully as possible.

1)  Why do I have this sense of doubt in my work or abilities?
2)  Is there truth to this?  If not, what is the lie behind it?
3)  What can I do to strengthen confidence in myself again?

Try these out and see where it gets you.

Success Measured by the Spoonful

posted in: Life, Writing | 2

As I mentioned back in my blog post on 03 November, for myself, success as a writer is to have my book in hardback/paperback form sold on the shelves of a bookstore.  Pretty simple, right?  I think so, however my wife and I recently had a discussion about success in general and then success as an artist.  I cannot speak for everyone (yeesh, could you imagine that kind of nightmare if you could?) but I know for myself, I would consider it a huge accomplishment to have a book written and sold to the general public.  No bestseller accolades or movie deal needed.  I’m good with the one book.

Now, come on, you know I don’t mean I want to write a single book and only one.  I have way too many stories floating around in my head to stop at one.  The purpose of writing stories is to share them.  Why else do it?

This came about because I was telling my wife how even if I did get published and was capable of writing full time and able to support us financially through those means, I would still work my day job.  More than anything, it’s a personal decision (also, I think I would get super bored otherwise.  I need to leave the house for a day’s worth of work in order to keep myself sane).  I do not fault anyone who chooses the opposite.  My hope would be you are able to fully support yourself, your family (if you have one), and maintain a level of content and happiness that lets you sleep easy every night.

Part of our conversation led into the idea that our culture does not adhere to a way of thinking that encourages artists to do what they love to do and survive by doing only that.  I asked her if our society ever did this?  Without doing research (I just don’t want to right now due to the rabbit hole I’d most likely fall into), I find it hard to believe that a writer, painter, sculptor, etc. could pay all the bills and plan for the future and retirement just by royalties earned from their works (notice how I didn’t mention actors or musicians. They’re a bit different).  If I’m wrong, please shoot me an example.  I’d love to read up on examples.

This is all not to say there were outliers but I just wonder if success comes in the form of finding time to be creative and still provide by keeping a day job.  Like I said, this is just me and my mind wanders to these sorts of things every once in a while.  I guess I should add a caveat and say that if I were able to live off of royalties from my books, I think I’d still work part time.  Retirement is really the only stage in my life where I don’t want to go to an office every day, sit in a cube, and support a project.

If I’ve discovered anything about myself since starting this journey of writing stories, it’s that I simply love to create.  Being able to do so whether I’m paid or not for it doesn’t affect my attitude in the process.  And I wonder if my attitude towards writing would change if I woke up everyday and knew if I didn’t make a deadline or my next book sales are poor, I might struggle to pay the bills.  Would that affect my joy and passion?  Just something I think about…

Call to Action: I was serious about examples of a time period where artists could survive financially solely on the earnings from their art.  Let me know!

Empathy

posted in: Life | 0
I’ve had this topic for a blog post on the schedule for a while now but kept pushing it back because I didn’t know how quite to approach it.  I think I’ve processed it enough and the recent real world events have allowed me to form some thoughts.

There’s a huge difference between sympathy and empathy.  Feeling sorry for others is (in my opinion) the lesser of the emotional responses.  But to be put in the place of another’s tragedy, pain, or loss progresses the human connection.  To empathize with others is to embrace what they are experiencing, to understand their position.  Why is this better?  Because to empathize is to be human.  Again, just my opinion.

I want to approach this with sensitivity.  I originally wanted to write about empathizing with characters and how that allows for a greater reading experience.  I could still write towards that end and believe it wholly important for a writer to understand and write with conviction.  However, in light of the recent hurricane tragedies, I’m being led down a different path.

I’m going to be completely honest with all of you.  I struggle with empathy.  On a personal level, I really do have a difficult time putting myself in the shoes of others who are or have suffered.  This is not to say my heart goes out to those in pain and suffering; I do in fact have a heart.  I just mean I don’t easily put myself in the shoes of others.  I don’t know why this is but it is something I’ve been aware of and trying to process through as I get older.  I should add that this is not just difficulty empathizing with strangers but even with family and friends!  My apologies to any if I’ve ever seemed unaffected by your loss and/or pain.  I promise I’m not some stone-hearted, cold-souled jerk.  I’m not (I can be a bit of a jerk at times but that’s due to my sarcastic nature).  The important thing is I’m conscious of this vice in my life and working towards correcting it.

I have to ask why I struggle to empathize and really dig deep.  Is it because I’ve never experienced loss or pain?  I’d argue that’s not true.  I’ve had family members pass, lost friends, gone through difficult emotional trials, etc.  I’m not immune to those natural occurrences while going through life.  None of us truly are unless you live alone, devoid of human contact, which is unlikely.

I think I struggle with empathy because I don’t jump into the pool right away.  My wife can attest to this best but I need time to process things.  I am not reactionary.  Things come at me and I step back, weighing the toll and consequence.  I would argue this is emotional maturity, however, if I deny myself immediate empathy, then do I risk denying human connection and relationships with others?

We want to feel loved.  To love and be loved back is the greatest human experience.  But with the good comes the bad and sometimes difficult things that cannot be planned for.  My journey in life is about people.  I’ve always known that.  As a writer, I need people.  I need to understand them and know what makes them who they are.  It’s essential.

I don’t write any this to say I do not empathize with those in need of help.  My heart goes out to them and I pray daily that they receive whatever they need.  I’ve watched plenty of recovery coverage and it actually stirs my heart to see people helping each other.  There’s no question of race, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, etc.  It’s a matter of helping because they can.

If I were closer to those affected by the hurricane, I’d like to think I would be there, helping wherever I can.  I went with the youth group I was helping with to Galveston, TX, after Hurricane Ike struck years ago.  We spent more than a week helping where we could, joining with another church ministry.  It was a great experience for me.  It taught me to be selfless and compassionate to those affected by tragedy.  While I struggle to empathize, I do not struggle with compassion.  My heart aches and I pray and hope that those in need find joy restored and pain healed.  My prayers are that the country will come together and provide and give ceaselessly to see those who lost their homes find restoration to what was lost.  To see the hungry fed and families reunited.

Little can be done by writing a blog.  I understand that but my hope is people will find it in their hearts to help wherever and however they can.  To do so showcases the true heights of humanity.  Our ability to put others before ourselves should restore hope.  We’ve done it as humans on more occasions than can be recorded and remembered.  It’s in us to prevail.

Call to Action: Donate wherever and however you can.  Look online for charities if you can’t physically go and help those affected by the hurricanes.  Simple.

A Writer on Vacation

posted in: Editing/Revision, Life, Writing | 0
This is a bit reactionary as a blog post.  I am writing this based on on my week-long vacation here in Colorado.  Sometimes, I think I can look at 7 days away from normal life and get a whole bunch of writing done, finish my revision, and start my agent querying letters!  Alas, I cannot… This morning (Friday) was the first chance I got to sit down and revise for more than an hour (which isn’t that long anyway).

While unfortunate, I think I need to be okay with getting little writing done while on vacation.  I’m sure other writers have different methods and can get work done but I think for myself, the pressure to try to write/revise even an hour a day is a little too stringent.  I’m around family and we like to get out of the house and go see the area and not be cooped up.  So, I’ve decided I need to make different goals while on vacation.  If I can write, I will but if I can’t, I won’t let myself be disappointed.

Instead, I think getting a lot of reading done is more feasible.  I love setting a reading goal for the year through Goodreads.  It helps me track, search, review, etc. books easily.  No muss no fuss (what even is muss?).  I finished one book on the drive to Colorado and had another ready.  My hope is to get this other book, Ready Player One by Ernest Cline, finished by the time I get home Sunday (while you’re reading this, I’m probably getting close!).


Side note: Ready Player One is almost the perfect book to read before I start my re-watch and review of Stranger Things Season 1.  For those who did not receive the latest newsletter, I announced that I would be re-watching Stranger Things in preparation for the release of Season 2 on October 27.

The purpose of vacation is to get away and relax.  I’m not sure how many people are able to do this and actually relax but I have thoroughly enjoyed my time in Colorado.  I did a lot and definitely feel as if I didn’t sit on my butt (which I have done on other vacations unfortunately) the whole time.  So, I hope to return home and to work refreshed and ready to get back in the grind of life.  Hope you all have had a great week wherever you’re at.  Talk to you soon!

Call to Action: If you get the chance, watch the following movies: Logan Lucky and The Big Sick.  The latter might not be your cup o’ tea but both were fun watches with great writing and characters.  My wife and I watched both while here and enjoyed them a great deal.

Creating an Editing/Revising Plan

I try to keep my blog informative and fun but sometimes I definitely want to write more towards fellow writers or even to those who are considering taking up writing.  Whichever you are (and maybe you’re neither but still like to come by and read my beautiful words), I hope today’s post will be beneficial.

If I had to estimate, I would say 40 percent of my writing experience is creating new content.  The other 60 percent is editing and revising.  I can often come up with new ideas quickly and hash out that first rough draft quickly with all the burrs and nicks.  In my experience, editing and revising are essential steps in the process of polishing a story to be ready to read.  Big rule for writers: Don’t let anyone read your rough draft.  Just don’t.  I know you’re excited to share your recent story and want someone else to love it as much as you.  Unlikely.  Just being honest.

In reality, your rough draft is not going to be good.  It may have parts that work really well but there will be wordiness and clunky dialogue more often than not.  Unfortunately…this goes beyond the rough draft.  For the love of all things sweet and shiny, I am seeing horrible mistakes in my fourth revision of my book!  Sometimes, it takes a few attempts to really chisel, sand, and polish before your story is ready to be read by another person.

I’ve been thinking about a system for myself and my own writing when it comes to editing and revising.  What would work best as I go through the process of making it worth reading and not come away having to answer a hundred questions of why this is that or what does that mean?  After a few questions like this, you start to question whether or not you acted prematurely in your earlier years.  So, I’ll preface this plan by saying I have not followed this yet.  This is merely my plan going forward with future books I write.  (Note: This is prone to change as I go through the process.)

Start: The rough draft is the beginning–the blank canvas.  That’s blank pages being filled in with whatever the writer’s mind is creating.  Notes and little ideas of setting and characters are implemented here depending on your level of preparation.  If you outline, then it’s easier but if you prefer the “go and flow” method, then the rough draft will have a definite coarse feel to it.

1st Edit/Revision: This should be done after you’ve finished the whole story.  Beginning and end have to be in place (write down any notes of things you want to change and plan to add, adjust, or delete after the story is done).  Resist the urge to go back and make corrections to page 10 when you are on page 230.  Until then, those changes you thought of while writing the rough draft should not be implemented.  Look for any grammatical errors as well.  Do not skip these.

2nd Edit/Revision: By this time, you know the story very well.  You could probably recite the whole thing to someone.  On this pass, I start looking at details.  Look for descriptions (characters, world, culture, themes, etc.) and make sure these are consistent throughout the story.  You are layering now.

3rd Edit/Revision: Step back and don’t look at or work on the story for at least a month.  If you are on a deadline, then I recommend some look-ahead planning.  When you come back to your story, you will see things you don’t like and will want to change.  Have at it!  One thing you may notice is wordiness.  Be willing to cut where it needs to be.  Rearrange some sentences if you need to.  Make it flow!

4th Edit/Revision: Read out loud.  I’ll be honest here.  I have not done this to a great degree but as I progress forward in my own writing, I have a plan to start reading my stories out loud to myself (not another soul in earshot!).  Why do this?  Because you will notice things.  Word flow will read bloated or stuffy.  You want flow.  Whether read in your head or out loud to a room full of listeners, you want your words to be silky smooth.

5th Edit/Revision: (I know, I know.  Almost there.)  Now, you might be tired of your story.  In fact, you are going to have doubts about it.  Before you convince yourself it’s not worth the paper it’s printed on, take a breath and relax.  You’ve put in the work and it should be ready to be read by others.  Find readers.  I would recommend friends and family who will be honest with you (not always easy to do but you should have some).  Make sure to tell them they need to be honest.  They do you no favors if they tell you you’re writing is the second coming of Tolkien, Dickens, or Milton (it likely won’t be).

Finally, take whatever feedback you get and apply those changes where you deem necessary.  Sometimes, you won’t always agree with the suggestions and that’s okay.  Preferences in readers is not gospel.  Don’t let it be.

There it is.  This is my editing and revising plan for myself.  There are other details but seeing as how this is a long blog post, I’ll leave it there.  Writing requires patience, effort, discipline, and the will to finish.  Being creative is not enough.  I did not know this when I first started and discovered it along the way.

Call to Action:  If you’re a writer or want to write, I’d suggest tucking this post away for reference.  There are plenty of other writers out there with different methods and probably even wrote books on the topic.  Find what works for you and stick with it.  Make changes along the way if you need to.  If you’re another writer and stumbled over here and have different methods, please share!  I’m always looking for ways to improve.

Managing Yourself: A Simple Principle

posted in: Fantasy, Life, Writing | 0

NOTE: In light of the events in Charlottesville today, I wanted to say I wrote this blog post weeks ago.  I want to make sure that none of the language used in the my writing could be mistaken for today’s events.  I will speak to the events here and say I am appalled at the racist hate displayed and in no way condone it.  I also am surprised by some of the responses on social media as well.  To think such things do not exist shows a lack of paying attention to the space in which our country has assembled.  I am not surprised and do not condone such actions but also am not scared or worried because a small number of hateful people decide to rally.  The small number of participants should remind us all that there are far more who do not stand with the hateful.  Those of us who choose to love our fellow men no matter color, culture, political side, and/or religious beliefs far outnumber the few who embrace hate in their hearts.

As strange as it is and this being my blog, everything stated is my own opinion and based on my experiences, convictions, beliefs, and research into various topics.  I know, you read that first sentence and think, “Oh boy, where’s this going?”  I try to keep this blog grounded in writing and whatever influences I have in my journey.

However, I have noticed something in recent months that has me somewhat concerned but not apprehensive in my pursuit for traditional publishing.  Just some thoughts I’ve been wanting to share.

Twitter is quite the social media tool/outlet to connect with all kinds of people from all kinds of walks of life.  I’ve been able to follow, interact, and have discussions with unpublished and published authors, editors, agents, and others in the book industry.  This has been a fun experience for me and allows me to ask questions, find resources, and even form acquaintance-like relationships.

In spite of all this, though, I also come up against some things that flash warning signs.  Now, I’m approaching this carefully because I don’t want to offend or stir anything.  If this blog post leads to anything, I hope its respectful dialogue.  I have no interest in debating or converting for any purpose.  I want to share some concerns.

If you are unaware (I seriously don’t know how that could be) but there are a lot of dividing lines right now in the US.  Politics, religion, and even sports produce some really nasty things “said” about and to people who may not share the same views.  Now, I could unfollow those who have these different views from me but I honestly like to read what people are saying so I understand where they’re coming from.

My chief concern though when it comes to the writing industry is will I be ignored or attacked if I don’t share the same views so openly expressed?

I do not get political or even religious on social media.  I follow many people who I share different views than and read things every day I do not agree with.  However, I have and hold to a position that I cannot manage anyone but myself.  It’s not easy but it’s a great discipline to have.  Others are very open about their anger and sometimes hate of other people and this makes me wonder if I will be “denied” opportunities if I disagree with those who hold the keys.  I think it’s a legitimate concern for me to have but at the same time I trust that my writing and storytelling abilities will supersede any disagreements.

If I could offer any kind of advice (totally up to you if you want to follow it or not; you won’t offend me if you don’t or call me a name), it would be that I think people need to be careful of vitriol espoused on social media.  Not because you’ll offend someone but because people like me will wonder, “Can I have any kind of relationship with this person if they find out I don’t share the same views as them?”

The writing community is a unique place in that there’s usually a lot of support and few “rivalries”.  When writers announce their successes, I see way more support and congratulations than the opposite.  There may be jealousy but that drives a lot of writers to believe they can be the next one to sign that book deal contract.

However, and I’ve seen this a lot in recent weeks, there are writers and agents that are extremely hostile and sometimes plain disgusting with what they say in response to something outside of writing that they are upset over.  I get it.  There are things that drive me up the wall and boil my blood as well but I don’t think it’s worth my time or effort to say anything on a social platform (part of me doesn’t think anyone cares anyway).

Obviously, I am not saying this sort of behavior should be stopped.  Far from it actually.  Speak and be heard but I know there are consequences for saying things.  For me, I never want to jeopardize future relationships because of a quick response born out of anger or offense.  As I stated before, I can only manage myself and I want to always be mindful of how my words affect not only others but myself in the grand scheme of things.

Call to Action: Now I don’t know if my concerns are legitimate or not but I’ll probably share stories once I get deeper into the agent/publishing levels.  Until then, sign up for the newsletter!  (Yes, you’ll see this push throughout the month.)

Stretching and Testing: Exploring Other Genres

posted in: Fantasy, Storytelling, Writing | 2
While at this time in my life as a writer I am focusing on fantasy, I often wonder what it would be like to sit down and try to write a story (at whatever length) that moves away from my preferred genre.  I dabbled in this in the past with short stories for classes and while they were definitely not fantasy, I always approached them with the desire to explore different characters who had secrets or qualities that were not revealed until the very end (I may have to dig these up and consider revising).

I blame this blog post of a rabbit trail of creativity on my attempt at reading non-fantasy books.  As I’ve stated before, I am looking for different kinds of books to read to help stretch my writing muscles.  So far, I delved into biographies and a few contemporary fiction novels.  I’ve enjoyed these books for various reasons but I can’t help but wonder, “If I were to write a satirical novel or maybe something considered horror, what kind of story would I write?”

So often, I see motivational and inspirational quotes, encouraging writers to write what they love.  I wholeheartedly agree with this but I can’t help but think there’s value in trying new things.  Obviously, my time is taken up by my devotion to my fantasy series but what’s to stop me from taking a few hours and try to write something that takes place in the late 20th century or more recent?  Nothing really to be honest.  It could serve as a simple creative exercise and there are benefits to that practice.

At this time, I think if I played with any kind of new idea, I’d have to keep it to a short story word count.  If I were to stretch myself too thin, I think I could easily become overwhelmed and that could affect my writing commitments.  This would not be good for myself in the end.  So, a short story would have to be limit.

I think writers can sometimes become distracted by fresh ideas, neglecting current stories that are further along.  I kind of attribute it to being like a new pair of shoes.  You love them when you buy them, wear them everyday, and tell yourself you don’t need another pair for years.  Then, you’re browsing online or at a store and boom!  You spot another pair of shoes that convince you immediately your current shoes are worn down too much to be worn much longer.  I would encourage all writers to watch out for this situation.  You are the best judge of your stories but do not trash something that you cherish just for the sake of something new and fresh.

Call to Action:  Does anyone have a good recommendation for a book of short stories?  I think I need to read more to get a better feel for their length and convention.

Steady Pace: Writing Action Sequences

I’ve recently worked on a long action sequence in “So Speaks the Gallows” and the effort made me think it was a good time to blog about writing action.  This is based on my own experience and in no way a “must follow” instructional.  Just some thoughts, ideas, and practices I’ve found myself able to explore over time.

Writing action scenes is not an easy endeavor to say the least.  When thinking epic fantasy, the images of epic battles similar to what can be found in the Lord of the Rings movies comes to mind.  Visualizing these sequences for the screen has its own set of difficulties (see the Appendices of the movies for further detail).  For novel writing though, it’s a bit different.  The action has to be described in a way that holds and maintains the reader’s attention without inundating them with any confusing language or unnecessary details.

This is a difficult part of writing.  I did not understand this in the beginning and actually prefer smaller scenes of action than large scale warfare.  There are writers that do both very well.  Brandon Sanderson (via the notes and direction of Robert Jordan) was able to do this in the final book of the Wheel of Time series, A Memory of Light, which is a massive final battle that has so many moving parts and elements that it’s amazing to read.

For myself, action sequences need to be treated in a way that moves and does not stall.  Characters are engaged in often life and death situations and have to act in order to survive.  Their choices should reflect this and if they make a mistake, then there should be consequences.  For myself, I don’t like it when the “heroes” are untouchable.  Emotions should be tugged on throughout action sequences both in the characters and the reader.

Something I try to keep in mind while writing action is forward progress and the toll taken on the characters.  Long fights where neither side gets tired is unrealistic (unless we are dealing with superheroes and/or ridiculous fights in the Matrix).  Two guys with swords fighting to the death are not likely to last more than a few minutes.  The best training in the world does not mean the body does not lose energy and grow tired.  And if and when one side suffers an injury, that has an affect on the body as well.  Loss of blood forces the body react in a way to compensate for the wound.  This is something I personally pay attention to while writing any kind of fighting scene.

Let there be a cost.  This is sort of my mantra whenever things turn violent in anything I’m writing.  Violence is a means of entertainment we find in all mediums but we are far removed from any ideology that the good guys never lose.  It’s difficult for me to write an action sequence and write the deaths of characters I know very well after so many years with them but they are not and cannot be untouchable.  There is a difference between killing characters off for shock affect and characters dying because they were bested and/or caught in the crossfire.  This is difficult to pull off and while I could justify the killing of a character (whatever their role in the story), some readers could easily say they feel cheated by the death, arguing it was unnecessary.  It’s up to me to make it justifiable in the end.

Action should pull on the reader in several different ways.  It takes years to practice and become good at it.  My recent revision of the long sequence I mentioned previously revealed a lot about myself when I first wrote it.  Too often, I ran into paragraphs that simply did nothing to push the action forward.  These stilted moments were amateur to say the least and I am pleased with the revision.  There’s a flow–a pace–to writing these scenes and while I continue to test myself and improve, I believe I’m closer to applying my writing style and voice to these difficult scenes.

Call to Action:  So, we recently watched the movie “Baby Driver”.  I whole-heartedly recommend viewing this fine film.  Not only is it fun and original, but it does something for action sequences that is not only entertaining but strikes the creative chord (pun intended).  How?  The director, Edgar Wright, syncs the soundtrack of the film to the action.  Trust me, you’ll love it.

Urgency for Agency: Search for an Agent

Plans change.  Most often, they change because a previous thought or idea can be influenced by new information.

I recently listened to a Q&A with a literary agent and there were some preconceived ideas I had about the process for publishing for myself that were shattered.  This has opened my eyes and my mind to make some changes.  I’ve sat with it for a few weeks now and I’m willing to say I’ve been approaching my goal the wrong way.

While not going into the deeper specifics, I’ll simply say that I had previously planned to self-publish the first novella of the Ravanguard series and use that as a means for attracting an agent.  In my mind, this was a great idea that showed initiative and forethought.  While I think this is partly true, I think after some processing and reflection, my approach was also in due part based in fear that my writing would not be good enough to attract an agent based on the writing of book 1.

This is the kind of fear every writer deals with.  My wife is gracious enough to help convince me that it’s a fear that I do not and should not worry about.  I agree.  I believe in my writing and the story I have to tell.  I’ve simply suffered a flat tire in the journey but thankfully, the spare is on and I’m on track again.

So, my plan has shifted.  I will not pursue self-publishing “Dim the Veil”.  It still serves as a companion to the series and is canon and will likely be published in the future but book 1 of the Ravanguard series, “So Speaks the Gallows”, is the top priority from her on out.  This is the vehicle for the series and I mean to see it as the selling point for gaining an agent.

Currently, I have been moving through book 1 with a friend, who has graciously offered his time, to fine comb through the book.  Seeing as how this book is over 450 pages, it has been a long process.  However, I’ve decided to refocus my revision efforts based on the feedback and discussions and I will make this final polish before searching for an agent.

Finding an agent is a process in itself.  It requires patience.  I will likely receive rejection letters but I do believe the right agent is out there for me and it will be a person I can partner with for the future.  They don’t make money unless they successfully sell the book to a publisher.  I learned a great deal through the Q&A session I listened to and will likely listen to it a few more times just to make sure I’m fit with the knowledge needed to move forward.

My wife has actually encouraged me to look for an agent for a few years now and I fought it in an attempt to convince her my plan was the right way to go.  It’s never fun to eat crow but everything is better with BBQ sauce (hickory and sweet, not spicy).  It’s an adjustment and those are never easy to realign to but I believe now that this is the route I need to take.

While I am revising book 1, I will also be preparing my query letters for agents and making sure those are top notch as well.  It’s an art in itself.  There are some rules that stretch across the board but a lot of agents have some differences in how they want to be queried.  The list of agents is growing and I have hope that he or she who decides to invest in me is in that list.

Call to Action: Despite these changes, I will continue on as I have been.  The next newsletter is still set for an August release.  Sign up if you haven’t.  Definitely expect a bigger update on book 1 and searching for an agent at that time.  I’m going to limit how much I discuss it here on the blog (if I can).

Pressure Tester: Meeting the Content Quota

posted in: Fantasy, Flash Fiction, Life, Writing | 0

I took the Memorial Day weekend as an opportunity to conduct a little experiment.  Since I started this blog and launched my website, I knew I needed to up my game and produce content.  I knew I needed to have more of a presence on social media (Twitter primarily because of its format, features, and links to other writers).  What I didn’t know though was the amount of time this required of me.

I’ve done enough research to understand how marketing myself as a writer on the interwebz is important as I pursue my dream of publishing my stories.  The blog was a great opportunity for me to write and share.  The benefits have been great (I’ve already shared that to some extent and won’t regurgitate it at the moment).  I’ve tweeted and interacted with other writers as opportunities allowed.  Overall, the experience has been good but… To put it bluntly, I’ve run into a bit of a wall.

Let me explain (No, there is too much.  Let me sum up).  Being that active on Twitter has been time consuming.  I got into a habit where I always had a tab open to Twitter and would continually keep an eye on my feed.  I wouldn’t tweet something every hour on the hour but I tried to so throughout the day because all the research I did told me I had to be a continuous presence in addition to adding content.  Other than tweeting, my blog posts every other day have been the majority of my content.

A little vulnerability I’d like to share with everyone: it has been a bit a let down but only because I think my expectations were too high.  I get way more spam comments (all of these I have to go through and mark as spam behind the scenes of my website) and I see no real evidence that I am gaining consistent followers.  This could be for a number of reasons (everyone’s got a blog nowadays, especially writers, so I get that there are a lot of options) and the one I keep coming back to is I’m still at the beginning stages of this season of being “present”.

This is not to say I do not appreciate the comments I do receive from real people.  I love being able to read them and respond.  If I don’t respond, I apologize.  I am trying to be better about it.

Even on Twitter, I’ve come to this hovering number of followers and wonder what I’m doing wrong.  Am I tweeting the wrong things?  Am I hash tagging wrong?  Am I focusing too much on writing and not other interests I have?  If I tweeted more about sports, music, food, etc. would I risk losing the followers I do have?  These are questions I continually wrestle with and have yet to find an answer.

Please don’t take this blog post as a rant or complaint.  It’s not.  I’m processing my actions and the steps I’ve taken over the last five months of going all in.  I trust that I am very much in the early stages of this leg of the race and need to merely slow to a steady pace whereas I was sprinting and have started to hit the wall (I carbo-loaded on the Twitters).

In my mind, the experiment during the last holiday weekend was to see what it “felt” like to unplug.  I decided to step away and not have my laptop in front of me with a Twitter tab open the entire three days.  It was difficult at first because there’s this odd sense that I will miss something by not staying connected.  But then, I have to ask myself, why do I feel the need to stay connected at that level?  It was ultimately draining and I suffered from something I truly don’t want to fall under the pressure of and that’s always being connected through social media.  I can easily let my posting habits become more organic than forcing myself and putting myself on a strict schedule.

If not, then I will burn myself out.  I’ve done so in other areas and through different seasons.  Trying to constantly put out content and interact through social media is too much for me.  I have so many other interests and priorities that I don’t want to let slip away.  These “others” are what fuel me and give me joy.  Constantly tweeting and trying to come up with content that would attract readers and followers is exhausting and it’s not how I want to live my life.  What I want is to write and share the stories I have in me with the world.  Writers have done that for centuries before we ever got to this place of instant-connectivity.

This is not to say technology and our current culture of content intake is bad but I think I need to take a step back and refocus.  I can do both but I cannot sacrifice my relationships, writing, and interests for the sake of building my brand when I’m not quite there.  At least not at the rate I have been trying to.  It’s too much weight and I’ve been putting it all on my shoulders.  I think once I have “Dim the Veil” ready for release or leading up to the release, I need to step back.

Call to Action: No, I’m not going to encourage you to step away from your devices today, lol.  We get that from all over now.  While I do think it’s healthy, I want to encourage everyone to simply consider what they’re putting out there.  What’s your involvement?  What content are you pouring out?  Is it about sharing your life and being encouraging or dumping your trash for the world to see?  We should strive to be better than the negative ninnies out there.  Let’s be better.  Let’s be uplifting, honoring others wherever they are at in their journey.

Pulp Diction: Writing Dialogue

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 0

I cannot tell you how to write dialogue.  There are some standard rules and basic principles attached but in the long history of writer’s writing dialogue for their characters, there is a spectrum of style and usage.  This is not an instructive attempt by me or “how to” post.  Instead, it’s more about how I have come to learn to write it.

A story without dialogue is…well, let’s just say not impossible to write but in my mind difficult and not really necessary especially in fiction.  Readers dive into fiction to experience the lives of the characters in the narrative.  The best way to do that is through the dialogue (external and internal) and actions of the characters.  I cannot for the life of me think any modern story would be a fun read if dialogue were removed.

(Actually, something tells me Tolkien could have done this but the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings would have been a fantasy history rather than an epic.  See the multiple appendices for Middle Earth for reference.)

When I started out, my dialogue writing was less than stellar (as it should have been by an eighteen year old with no experience).  It has taken years for me to learn the discipline to do so.  And I’m far from being what I’d like to be when it comes to dialogue.  I think my current venture into writing the film treatment/screenplay for my movie idea will help since dialogue plays a huge role in the telling of the story (no interior monologues included and all visual storytelling methods are used).

It’s easy for me to say all my characters in the beginning of my writing journey sounded the same (that’s just an easy way to describe it).  What I mean by this is, I did not understand how to write the “voices” of different characters very well but that’s because I did not have the practice or skills of diving deep into the characterization of each speaking person.  In my mind, this was not an important element.  Back then, I just wanted to write and create new worlds.  Start at the beginning and work my way to the end to see what I come up with.  The voices of characters was sort of tossed in the side bin labeled “consider adding later”.

Characters who do speak in the story have to be differentiated by a number of things.  Where were they born?  What were their experiences growing up?  What was the culture like in which they lived?  What is the extent of their education?  What religion, if any, did they practice?  What are their dreams?  What are their fears?  Did they suffer from any abuse or disabilities?  All of these factors shape people into who they are!

Now, you can go over those questions and easily say, “A writer has to know all of those for each speaking character in order to write dialogue?!  That’s crazy!”  Yes.  Yes, they do and yes it is.  Maybe this is why non-writers are so mystified (I embellish a bit by using that word) that writers (especially fantasy writers) can create so much and hold of it in their heads and write full epic stories from start to finish.  We’re not wizards ourselves, I assure you (or are we?).  What we possess is a strength in creativity that is just different.  I can easily admit I’m mystified (I do mean to use that word in this case for myself) at the creativity and ability of artists who paint, sculpt, sketch, compose, etc.  It’s something I envy and wish I could do!

When I start writing the main point of view character and begin to have them speak, I learn so much about them.  I wish I could explain it in a way that is academically profound but the truth is, I learn who they are as I write the words coming out of their mouths.  How they speak to others is just as enlightening!  Developing a relationship between them and family, friends, strangers, and/or enemies is part of the magic.  It’s writing interactions between my characters that gives me the most joy.  I could not write scenes upon scenes where dialogue is absent.  Some writers can and I applaud them but I need to write dialogue for the sake of keeping my characters and their journeys progressing forward.

Differentiation between characters and giving them their own voice in the story is difficult and takes practice but it can be done well and in a way that stands out to the readers.  This is important and I stress that to anyone who wants to write or has recently tackled the art of storytelling.  I cannot tell you how to master this but I can tell you it’s worth mastering.  There are plenty of resources out there that can help and I encourage looking for them, studying them, and putting those methods to use.  Stories should be vibrant in their descriptions and in their use of dialogue.

Call to Action: Listen to people and how they talk.  Pick a few you know and really keen in on the differences from you and from those you know well.  It’s amazing the little nuances people have in the way they speak that makes them an individual.

The Benefits of Writing Flash Fiction

My experiment of writing flash fiction since January has been one of invaluable joy.  While it started out as a way to flex the writing muscles and provide additional/different content through the blog, it has turned into something that I believe will thrust me into a sea of possibilities in the future.

I hope you all have enjoyed the flash fiction posts at the end of each month.  The next is fast approaching and I truly enjoy writing these little glimpses into the Shoals to the Hallowed world.  (Side note: My goal is to provide several viewpoints–a new one each month–and then continue on in those viewpoints by next year.  So that means you’ll have twelve distinct viewpoints introduced this year and next year, I’ll be continuing from those twelve.)

My never delving into flash fiction was a result of not really having a platform to explore and release those kinds of stories.  The blog opened the way for me and I’m glad I took those steps.  The benefits have helped me in many regards but I want to focus on one single benefit for this blog post.

Flash fiction forces the writer to value each and every word, choosing only the ones that matter most for the current story told.  What I mean by this is, I try not to exceed 550 words in a flash fiction story.  Some that I have written over the last few months have been too long and I had to whittle those down.  Parameters aren’t always a bad thing when telling a story.

This practice forced me to pick and choose, editing finely, so that the story could be told in full without what I like to call “fluff”.  This makes the story in its glimpse form edged and to the point.  Too often when writing in larger word counts, the propensity for fluff leaks through.  I chalk this up to the desire to add detail in a first draft more for the sake of the writer, setting reminders for themselves, more so than for the readers to need at that time.

As you can probably imagine, I notice the fluff as I go through the revision process with the longer works like book 1 of the Ravanguard series.  Both good and difficult at times, I definitely struggle with knowing what is sometimes fluff and what is important to the details of the narrative (that’s the continued process of becoming a better writer).

The flash fiction stories serve multiple purposes for myself as I continue to write and gain experience.  You all are involved in the experimental process I’ve set in front of me.  I know there are other lessons I’ve learned but being able to take notice of detail in word count forces my hands (ha!) to be patient and considerate whereas in past cases I’ve acted very loose in how I frame the narrative and each scene within.

Call to Action: It may be years down the road, but I do plan on compiling all the flash fiction stories for the Shoals to the Hallowed.  I’ve even started planning and thinking about the bigger picture for the series though it may be many many years down the road.  I’m curious to know what people think so far.  Let me know because I’m interested in getting feedback.  Thanks!

Assimilating Adulthood

posted in: Writing | 2

I blame today’s blog post entirely on my listening to too many biography audiobooks.  That’s the excuse for this somewhat offbeat exploratory topic.

My listening to these audiobooks leads me to often think (and sometimes answer questions aloud in my car while I’m driving to and from work as if I’m being interviewed) about the chapters I would include in a biography or memoir if ever I were to write one.  I’m not convinced I’ve done enough to warrant such a work.

So this is what I will call a pseudo-chapter if I were to write one (big “if”).

Adulthood.  How the heck do you know when you’ve entered into it?!  I seriously don’t know.  I’m thirty-two years old and I don’t feel (sometimes I barely consider myself) an adult.  I thought maybe after high school I’d feel like one.  Nope.  Or after college.  Nada.  Well when I get married, I’ll definitely feel and know I’m an adult.  Strike three!

How am I supposed to constitute being an adult?  Job, stress level increase, pay bills, etc.  None of those things have set in motion and finalized with a searing seal my understanding and loathing apprehension of taking on the persona of adulthood.  Still waiting.

Kids!  Yep, that will absolutely do the trick!  But what if it doesn’t?  What if I just feel like a kid with a kid?  Do you see my dilemma?  Is it a dilemma or am I just asking an age-old question that cannot be universally answered like 2+2?

Then, I also need to ask, “Well, Adam, why do you still not view yourself as an adult?”  Great question!  I think I’d answer because I don’t feel like I’m not able to do the things I love in life.  That’s not to say I viewed adults as being older people who were joyless drones counting down the days until they could dirt nap into eternity to make up for sleep lost.  Not at all but that seems to be a cliché for the ages (get it).

Hear me out.  Maybe I just answered my own question on accident (this happens a lot when I engage in active processing through writing).  What if adulthood is just an abstract thought/idea we (our society) use to placate children and youth with in order to usher in some kind of off-brand nonsense of responsibility?  (Did I use placate correctly in that sentence?  I think so.)

What if it’s not about feeling like an adult?  What if it’s more about not losing the love of life and the things that make you happy?  Responsibility is a byproduct of maturity, not adulthood, so I’m not saying the “R” word should be avoided.  I’m a big proponent, in fact.  If I was stripped of being able to write because of (fill in the blank), then I could guarantee my dronedom taking affect.  So maybe in all this, I’m simply stating that adulthood is a state of joylessness.  Best to be avoided for the sake of your sanity.

Do the things you love.  If work, relationships, circumstances, or anything of the same ilk have you dreading waking up, maybe we need to reassess.  How many of us care enough about our lives to make drastic changes in order to feel at peace?  This is in no way an easy decision to make let alone come to but I wonder if monikers like adulthood are a crippling bondage chain forced upon us?  Kind of like how Valentine’s Day is meant to remind us to be romantic and considerate of our significant other (hint: this should not be the case).

Call to Action: Am I alone in this?  Do any of my peers think/feel the same way?  Do any of you actually feel the opposite and view yourselves as an adult and have a definition and/or revelation you want to share?

Strong at Five

posted in: Life | 2

Today’s a treat.  My wife and I have been married five years today and I couldn’t be happier to call her my best friend and super awesome spouse (I’m having the t-shirt made #copyright).  I’m all about honoring other people when I can (and I hope to do so in future blog posts but she get’s first dibs).

My wife and I met back in 2010 (I have this nagging feeling that I’m getting that date wrong…she’ll correct me in the comments, I’m sure).  I was her youngest brother’s drum teacher and she was a soon to be graduate of high school.  Friendship materialized and then we had the DTR (define the relationship) talk.  Suffice to say, the feelings were mutual and we embarked on the beginnings of what is now a wonderful marriage.

These five years have not been easy and at times difficult.  I won’t divulge the more personal details (do you really care or just nosey?) but here’s a highlight of what will test newlyweds.  I lost my job a few months into our marriage and while she had a full time job and we did receive unemployment benefits, this was not easy, especially for me as I felt the timing could not have been worse.  However, we never struggled financially.  We were able to pay our bills and we never had to ask our parents for help financially.  That’s not to say generosity took the form of dinner invitations several times a week but I like to chalk that up to our parents simply wanting to see us now that we were out of our respective houses.

This experience though never materialized to anger, fighting, or fear on our parts.  We trusted God to open doorways and He did after six months where I was able to get an amazing job that has led to where I’m at now.  Other hardships have come by way of our learning to live with each other and having to make decisions in areas where our lives would be affected both short term and in the long run.  We’ve stuck together.  No matter the circumstance.  We’ve both made mistakes, displayed selfishness and failed at communicating.  However, there’s always been trust and honor between us.  She sees my faults and calls me out and I do the same for her and we know and are thankful that we compliment each other in this way.

I always feel that I am learning since I’ve been with her.  I learn about myself, about her, and how to navigate through any given situation.  We laugh, cry, love, tease, and live well together (there’s your Hallmark card!).

I’d like to say Happy Anniversary to my wonderful wife, Leesie, who is my best friend.  I love your guts!

Call to Action: This one is for myself.  She will be gone this weekend spending time with friends, so I am going to clean the apartment and get that spare room cleared out.  I’ve never moved a futon by myself.  Should be fun!