My Cup Runneth Over

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Music, Review, Writing | 0

Couple of things to go over first before I get into the trappings of my mind today.  This is going to be kind of subject to subject type of post but a good overview of the happenings in my fun-filled life.

Business first.  There may be some changes coming to my blog posting schedule.  If you’ve paid attention, I post on every even day of the week (2nd, 4th, 6th, etc.) unless the “On This Day” post lands on an odd day.  Roughly, that means I’ve posted about 14-15 posts a month.  After five months of this, I’m beginning to wonder if I can keep up that kind content production for the foreseeable future.  So, starting in June, I’ll be switching it up.  My plan is to begin posting every three days instead of every other day.  That means blog posts will likely be on the 3rd, 6th, 9th, and so on of every month.  There will be variances of course depending on when the “On This Day” post falls (maybe that will be a bonus post for the month).  Everything else will stay the same though.

Still nothing on the book art for “Dim the Veil” but I’ll let everyone know once that happens.  No progress on the method for savings towards the professional edit either.  I’m going to be looking into some options soon though and hopefully come to a decision.  Again, I decided against gofundme and kickstarter because if someone decides to give anything over $5, I fear that I cannot offer them anything in return besides the novella once I release it and I don’t believe that’s ethical.

Viewing pleasures.  I recently watched the Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 and I have to say I truly enjoyed the film.  It did not quite go in the direction I expected and I was pleasantly surprised by the more sentimental parts and its focus on family.  It hit the heart strings on a few occasions.  And the music was awesome of course!  No other movies I can think to bring up but I am watching the new seasons of Better Call Saul and Fargo.  Both are great television shows that continue to hold strong in their narratives and character explorations.  I’ve wanted to get into the American Gods show based on Neil Gaiman’s novel but I haven’t had the time yet.  I can’t say I loved the book so I’m not uber-drawn to the show.
Soothing Sounds.  As both a writer and musician, I’m naturally drawn to music.  My musical journey has been interesting to say the least.  I may have to do a separate blog post on that soon because I’ve gone from genre to genre over my life and settled recently on pretty much a place where I didn’t think I would.  One of my favorite bands is Cold War Kids and their latest album “LA Divine” has been a constant whenever I have music on in the background (heads-up, I’ll be working on a blog post soon going over some of the lyrics from that album in a sort of semi-review).  Also, freaking Paramore (probably one of my top-five bands ever) has released their fifth album “After Laughter” and that will be played out in no time between myself and my wife (her favorite band).

Bookworming.  Recent reads include a bevy of books.  A couple of fantasy tomes were “Heroes Die” by Matthew Woodring Stover and “Shadowmarch” by Tad Williams.  Both were good for what they were but did not blow my hair back.  “Heroes Die” was more an original idea with sort of a pseudo-sci-fi element to it.  “Shadowmarch” reminded me of “Game of Thrones” and some of the other books of that ilk.  I also finished Mark Haddon’s “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” which I will probably review in the next newsletter.  Definitely a fun “read” as I listened to the audiobook.  I’m a little behind in my reading challenge over at Goodreads so I need to get on it and read some shorter books I think.  It’s these 500-600 page fantasy epics that really slow me down :/

Fun Stuff!  So, we’ll be going to Colorado to visit family in September and I was lucky to find that my baseball team, the San Francisco Giants, will be in Denver playing the Rockies while we are there.  So, I jumped on the chance to see my team play  for the time live and bought tickets for one of the games!  Super excited!  I haven’t been to a baseball game since I was in my early teens.  Should be a great experience with my dad, uncle, cousin, and brother-in-law.  The great thing about baseball games if that they don’t cost an arm and a leg to go.

And that concludes your quick update of my life.

Call to Action: I’m curious to know if anyone has any thoughts on how often I post blog posts.  One every other day was really a challenge to myself to see if I could do it but also provide enough content to gain readers.  I can’t say for sure if this has really gained people interested in reading my content though.  I don’t get much feedback besides from friends and family (am I even doing this right? lol).  Maybe switching it up will help.

Thoughts Not Shared

posted in: Uncategorized, Writing | 2

Something I often wonder is if I should dare blog about more topical issues based on the current climate of our society here in the States.  I go back and forth on this for a number of reasons.  Does my opinion (because that’s what it is) matter?  Would I add anything of value to the conversation?  Is it a conversation or just a screaming match?  You get it, right?  It doesn’t take much effort to look through the porthole and find the rocks being thrown (verbally and physically these days) when it comes to opposing views.So let’s just talk more about storytelling!!!  Just kidding.  I wouldn’t tease you just for the sake of peaking interest.

For myself, I should state that I am not oblivious to the happenings outside of my bubble here in California, deep in the Mojave Desert.  I have taken an interest recently and at the beginning (I admit, I stayed clear of social issues/politics for several years simply because my interests lay elsewhere) I was left sort of at a loss.  I realized I knew very little about what was going on.  You’d think as a writer, I’d be more in tune with the world.  You thought wrong!  I’ve been more curious about other time periods to be honest (as a fantasy writer, you tend to focus more on that period called “Medieval”).

This post is not meant to convince anyone of anything.  Go back to one of my first posts back in January.  I believe wholeheartedly in the value of someone else’s opinions, thoughts, convictions, etc.  I’m not a salesman.  I gain nothing for trying to convert (it’s you who gains everything!  Kidding.  My smugness knows no bounds).  For myself, I’m simply trying to understand the world better and make sure I’m educated on history.  It’s the best resource we have to progressing and not committing the same mistakes.  Let’s not be a society that returns to its own vomit (gross but appropriate).

I’m of the opinion that people have value and that should not be based on ability.  Abilities can be lost or dwindle and therefore that means value can be lost.  Things without value are discarded and forgotten.  We should avoid this when it comes to people.  The greatest atrocities in history were committed because the value of others was diminished.  People are intrinsically valuable for the sake of their being alive.  Without going on a philosophical tangent, I’ll simply say that life is limited within the confines of time and what all people want is to find, experience, and maintain joy and to be loved.  I think those two basic needs can be sufficient for the purposes of this post.

As you’ve no doubt noticed, I haven’t and won’t likely dive into any hot button issues in these types of blog posts.  I’m not convinced it’s necessary for the time being.  I will offer my thoughts and you can either decide to read or not read them.  If you decide you disagree and feel the need to scream and yell, then it’ll fall on deaf ears because I control the comments.  If you write a blog, you can do the same thing for yourself.  If ever there is the chance for conversation (respectful and honoring each others views), then what will be welcomed.

There’s a vast need for discussions that are not based on anger.  Disagreement should be welcome.  There’s value in hearing and understanding someone else’s views.  That is not to say the more extreme views (anything that diminishes the value of another person) should be widely scrutinized.  Hate is an element of evil and that’s not what I’m talking about.  Opposing views can and should be invited into communities.

Call to Action: Find the gold in those you disagree with.  Obviously, you can’t do this with randoms on the interwebz.  Trolls are aplenty in the comment sections of YouTube and other websites.  However, everyone has people within the walls of their social circles (or at least you should) that has opposing views to your own.  If you know you can have a true conversation, then I would encourage you to do so.  You’ll learn some things from them and possibly yourself.  Happy living!!!

To the Screen

posted in: Film/TV, Writing | 2

As I’ve stated before, I’m a big fan of films.  Movies and television shows are a pastime I truly enjoy.  Whether visual spectacles or great characters, I continually gravitate towards that medium to experience storytelling.  I actually think I get a bit jaded because of this.  There are movies that are not necessarily good or praised by critics but I love because there’s a story element that grips me.  If you look at my Blu-Ray wall, you would definitely wonder why movies are there to which I enthusiastically explain why I love it.One of my desires as a writer is to write screenplays.  Now, it might be just for fun at this stage in my life but I do think I have stories that could be told and translated to the screen.  I often think about this and the embers are usually stoked once I’ve watched movies I have a special affinity for (anything by Cameron Crowe is often the instigator).

If I wrote a screenplay (something I may start working on just because I need one more thing added to my writing buffet), it would explore people in such a way that I identify with.  People love, hurt, and have dreams that satisfy their joys and desires.  In this, I would want to explore flawed characters who need to learn or have a revelation about themselves or others to find healing, peace, success, etc.

We can blame my recent viewing of Cameron Crowe’s “Elizabethtown” on today’s blog post.  I know it’s not his most acclaimed film but there is something about it that draws me in and makes me want to tell a story both visually and with the accompany of music.  I often joke that Crowe is my patronus (a little word play Harry Potter humor thrown at you).  He tells the stories I think need to be told.

I actually do have an idea for a movie that I’ve been rolling around in my mind for a little over a year but it needs a lot of work.  I have the resources to write a script but I don’t have a process for developing the story yet.  I’ve thought about doing it in novel/novella form first so that I know how it will go from beginning to end but I’m not quite sure if that’s the right method for me at the moment.  Maybe…  I don’t know.

If anything, the idea for this story that could potentially be developed into a screenplay just reinforces my desire to tell stories and explore new characters, settings, themes, etc.  There’s no way I could go day to day and remain sane without writing.  Even blogging has helped me keep up my imagination because I’m always thinking, “What should I write about next?”  I think exploring this movie idea may be something worth investing my time in.  More stories!

Call to Action: I’ll throw a couple of movie recommendations at you that are not Cameron Crowe films.  To name a few that I absolutely love and recommend you watching are: Little Miss Sunshine, The Hollars, This is Where I Leave You, and The Way Way Back.  Each of these inspire me to explore what I want to write as a potential screenwriter.

True to Self

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 3

Something that I continually come up against each day (I’m sure you do too if we’re being honest) is staying true to self.  This extends beyond my writing.  Everything I’ve given since starting this blog has been my genuine voice.  Thoughts are legit, lessons learned are still gripped tightly, and humor is straight from my wacky brain and how I view the world.  I admit, I hold some things back but for the most part, I keep it level.

I know I’m not alone in this because I see so many people everyday whether in my day to day or on social media expressing these practices of self.  Sometimes, you can tell people are still not all the way there but inching closer to understanding who they are, what they believe, and what their purpose is.  One thing I’m forever grateful for is my own journey in this regard.  To look back at my life just ten years ago, I get a little embarrassed knowing what I did and said to others and even what I thought about myself.

You can’t go back but you can learn from mistakes.  It’s only by these mistakes that I am able to shake my head and thank God I’m not there anymore.

(At this time, you’re probably saying, “Oh, it’s one of these blog posts.”  Yes, it is.  I dare you to keep reading!)

How this relates to writing is simply you have to write what you know and like.  I’ve tried writing stories set in another genre but not even I can push through the struggle.  Now, I don’t think I will forever write fantasy (I truly hope not) because then I’d be limiting myself.  My hope is that I can get these stories that are fresh and inside me out and off to the world, making way for others that might stray to different audiences.  A great example is Stephen King.  Love or hate him, he actually has stories that are not horror/thriller.  Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile are both his and wonderful stories!

If I wanted to have success in the literary world (or just a better chance at it), then I’d chase whatever fad is happening at the moment.  I tend to joke that I may do that just to see if I can get published faster but I’d feel too bad for selling out.  (No vampire meets werewolf gets locked in a game to the death dystopian future will be found in my books.  Ha!)

Again, in order for me to be able to push outside the boundaries (and comforts) of writing fantasy, it will require me to expand myself in new ways.  I don’t know what that looks like at this time or even how it will come about (probably naturally since that’s how most major changes in my life take place).  My climb out of the places of immaturity and naivety in my early twenties took quite a while (they do say boys take longer to become men and there’s definitely truth to that).

Perhaps a lot of people struggle with or are not willing to admit to their shortcomings or falls in youth but I love that I can share that journey.  I’ve had the opportunity to do so a few times with others and it’s therapeutic to be genuine and honest about that part of my life.  Even now, I have this sense of peace being a bit vulnerable and transparent with all of you.  I write and I consider myself a writer but if I cannot be true to myself in that aspect of my life, how could I expect to anywhere else?

Call to Action: If I did write the vampire meets werewolf after getting locked in a game to the death dystopian future story, I’d call it “Fang Games”.  Uh oh… I might have a fun little tongue-in-cheek story prompt I should throw out there to the interwebz.  By the way, if you are one who wastes time on Pinterest (I say that light-heartedly of course), then follow my writing board where you will no doubt be entertained by my pins of what I enjoy and find inspiring to my writing.  Find here: https://www.pinterest.com/adamhenderson49/my-writing-board/

Developing Characters

Short of being able to properly and coherently write sentences, characters are by-far the most important aspects of your story.  I’ve wrote on this to some length over the last few months and wanted to get into some specifics.  This will be a post about developing characters and I’m going to do it in a way that I hope makes things fun for you the reader.  How?  Well, as I write, I’m going to develop a brand new character for you!  (This character will be in a future short story–maybe in the next newsletter!)

Have at it!

Alright, there are “aspects” I want to consider first and you’ll just have to roll with me as I do this.  I want to create a character who is distinct.  What does that look like?  Well, I need to decide a few things that will be both somewhat general and differential when it comes to others.  (Just as a heads-up, all of these characteristics we’ll be developing are subject to change but I am going to try to keep everything the same so that when you come across the character in the short story, you will feel like you know them!)

Back to the distinctity (yeah, I know, not a word but it is fun to write and say!).

Let’s say the character’s name is Avroes Toal.  That’s a random name if ever I came up with one but let’s roll with it as we move on.  What will make him distinct.  Let’s say he is younger but has early signs of graying hair, making him self-conscious with the ladies.  One lovely lady in particular (this is a bit of a plot element so we’ll leave that alone for now).  Who is this man named, Avroes?  If he’s self-conscious about his hair, how else would that affect his personality?  I imagine him as being a bit of an over-compensator.  He looks for opportunities to prove he’s not older than he is and therefore has adopted more childish or immature ways.  This also affects his relationships both personally and professionally.

How are we doing?  Are you staying with me?  Good!  Onwards!

So, Avroes Toal is a young man (mid-twenties) who has prematurely graying hair and over-compensates this by acting out in ways to prove he is young and not old.  We’ll stray away from specifics because we don’t want to get too close to plot points.  Let’s also throw in some other details to round him out.  He likes the outdoors and would prefer pursuing a profession that allows him to see the world (cliché a bit, I know), but let’s say he wants this because his father and grandfather were both men perfectly fine with living their lives as scholars, devoted to studying and page-turning.  This is not Avroes the Gray (poor guy has a nickname he hates too!)

He’s a man looking forward and beyond the confines of a study or library, wanting nothing more than to see the world and prove he is not like his father and grandfather who have paved the way for him to have a good-paying occupation that will allow him to marry, have children and carry on the Toal legacy of ink stains and paper cuts.

Also, he hates heights and the library he would have to spend all of his days in is at the highest story of a building with many stairs and no banisters.  He seizes up anytime he actually has to approach a tall staircase, afraid his footing will give way and he’ll stumble to his death.  In fact, let’s say his grandfather fell and died and his father fell and lived but became crippled by the horrible circumstance (a little too tear-jerking for you? Misery is drama, ha!) and Avroes has to take care of his father.  Even better dramatic tension!  It’s so sweet, it drips.

There are many more (is that correct grammar?) things we can do to round out who Avroes Toal is and maybe that can be explored in the short story (guaranteed it will) but this is just to show my process for creating a character somewhat on the fly.  Who are they, what do they do/want/hate/love/etc.?

Call to Action:  Anything we can add?  Seriously, throw out a detail!  It doesn’t have to be too precise and can be a bit vague.  What’s his favorite color, food, idiosyncratic ticks, bad habits, etc.?  I’ll be able to add that into the short story and you’ll be able to say you had a part in it!

No Naturals Here

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 0

While I don’t necessarily like long road trip drives, I do enjoy them so long as I am with someone who’s enjoyable to talk to.  My wife is one of these wonderful kinds of driving companions.  We truly do find the hours a great time and opportunity to talk and discuss a bevy of topics.  Some of course are private (you won’t get access to those) but we do talk about music, writing, and art a lot of the time.  We’re creatives and are able to explore are our likes and dislikes pretty easily, encouraging each other along the way on the highway of asphalt and lines.

Something she said during our most recent drive home was that she boasts about me being a writer (a nerd writer to be precise, lol) and that led to her talking about how impressed she is that I can do what I do and she feels nervous writing anything and letting me read it.  I do the thing where I tell her she doesn’t need to be nervous and that she’s a good writer herself (she really is) but that led me to think about something I’ve encountered a few times: perception of writing abilities.

Let me be brutally honest and a bit transparent for a few seconds.  I really am not a natural talent.  If I was, I wouldn’t have two shelved novels that no one is allowed to see.  I’m not sure if there’s a misconception out there about writers as a whole or something else.  Our ilk is one often labeled with fine descriptions of neuroses, depression, inebriation, etc.  You know, those darn clichés.  Yes, I like sipping whiskey and I own a pipe but I’ve never used it (not yet and probably not ever).

In my experience and what I’ve been able to glean over the years is that if ever there was a “natural” when it came to writing, the closest specimen might have to be ole Bill Shakes-the-speare.  Even then, there are many who believe the persona of WS was fabricated and that his great plays and sonnets were in fact written by another’s hand and mind.  Could be, I don’t know.

My point is that writers are just like any other who is or becomes proficient in their craft.  They work at it.  Practice and exercising the appropriate muscles are a requirement in order to find any semblance of success.

I think where there’s any natural talent is just in the imagination gears of the minds of writers.  For me, to be able to create a vast world (fantasy definitely lends to being able to create more and bend some rules) filled with characters, nations, cities, cultures, flora, fauna, magic systems, and all the other little nuances that make the world come alive is purely by imagination.  I did all this as a little kid playing with action figures way before I was able to put words to paper.

Where others may be intimidated to show me or other writers their own writing, just realize I would be completely wrecked to try to play drums or bass with a bunch of professional musicians.  I would be a knot of nerves so tangled together that it would take way too long to undue.

Everything worth doing well takes time, experience, mistakes and maybe a hundred other things to get it right.

Call to Action: Just to continue with the topic, I would encourage you to keep at whatever you love to do when it comes to your creative outlet.  It’s absolutely worth it once you reach a level of proficiency.

My Essentials for World Building

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 0

World building in fantasy is almost like writing a full story in itself.  All fantasy authors I’ve researched and read about on this topic usually have the same process.  You have to do it.  In order for a full-fledged world to come alive in the pages, the reader has to believe these are real places that the characters live in.

I’m going to go over a few essentials that I highly recommend all writers develop, especially in fantasy.  All of these are aspects I’ve written extensive notes on and should not be overlooked or put to the side.  You’ll actually be surprised how much your story rounds out when these details are included.

1. Culture

What is it that makes the country/nation/island/region what it is?  History, customs, holidays, government, religion.  These are musts.  Think about whatever country you live in or are native to.  How did that country come into being?  What foundation was laid and at what cost?  Did it face conflict in order to maintain its statehood (is that the word?)?  What has each generation brought and caused to evolve?  I would not say you need to write an entire history book but the most important details should be explored and be a part of the characters.

1a. Religion

This is a big one that I never paid too much mind to in my early days.  I usually left it to a monotheistic deity that encompassed a wide range of belief or unbelief.  Honestly, I was a bit lazy and didn’t think it was worth exploring further.  Now, in the Ravanguard series, I have five dominant religions that are very different from each other (with the exception of two that are closely related but different in some respects).  I found after fleshing these out and applying them to characters that they were much more interesting and their choices were reflected according to their beliefs, which is very much what we do!

2. Landscape

This kind of seems like an easy one.  Oceans, rivers, mountains, etc.  All needed to give the appearance of a convincing natural setting but there’s more than these staples.  Bays, copses, ravines, hills, etc. to name a few.  Study these.  Look up pictures to get a good grasp of what they look like and how they form.  THEN, look at how they are utilized by civilization.  Boom.  Full circle.

2a. Ruins

Are there ruins?  Would there be historical sites?  What significance do they play?  Not everything has to be to the level of an Indiana Jones adventure but unless its a new civilization, there are usually signs of prior populations where artifacts are left behind and/or preserved.

3. Dialogue

Maybe there’s a fantasy or just fiction novel that uses no dialogue to tell its story but I’ve yet to run into it.  We speak just as characters should to reveal who they are and their understanding of the world in which they live.  Giving characters their own voice can be a challenge especially if you have a large number of speaking characters within the story.  If I had to make a rough estimation of speaking characters in “So Speaks the Gallows”, then I’d have to say there are anywhere between 60-80 characters who speak.  Those who speak more than a sentence or two shaves that list down quite a bit but I’m still writing the voices of a large number of people who I am telling you, the reader, is an individual and has their own history, experiences, beliefs, convictions, humor, dreams, etc.  Try handling all that and remaining sane!  I do and as I’ve spent time with these characters (some for the better length of three novels), their voices are as clear as crystal.

3a. Dialect

As I said with the religions above, that also means I’ve developed multiple forms of dialect, which includes vocabulary and slang.  This takes practice.  When I started out, all my characters talked the same as if they were all born from the same village.  It has taken years of writing and years of practice writing dialogue to be able to distinguish the speech of individuals from the place they came from.  I wish I could say I studied and did research to a great extent but I didn’t.  I’ve done a little but most of any differences you will find in speech between regions, nations, etc., is purely organic on my part.  I have those places and the people in them developed enough that they speak in a manner that I know how they would be differentiated.  The hope is that it translates onto the pages.

All of these elements are important in fantasy literature.  From Tolkien to the more modern writers, we can find great examples of worlds given great consideration.  Even in the fantastic genre, readers want to believe the world is real enough to be lived in.

Call to Action: Are there any other world building elements you think are just as important?  I’m sure there are.  I’d like to eventually write blog posts devoted to some of these and my experiences with them, especially since in my three major series that I have in the works, there are vast differences in the worlds.  Those may be in the writing queue.

Viewer’s Storytelling Recalibration

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 2

My wife and I watched the latest Disney animated feature, “Moana”, this past weekend and while I loved the movie, there was something that made my creativity gears start working (this happens alot when I watch shows or movies) and I wanted to share a bit of this…processing I possess.

This is not a review of the film.  Honestly, there is no reason not to see it.  Great music, story and humor throughout.  Fun for everyone!

So, this is what happens and I blame it on the writer in me.  I will often be watching something, and I’ll all of sudden wonder why a particular story moved in the direction it did.  Why did the character do that?  What caused that factor to play a part?  Why did they decide to shift the story in that direction?  All of these hit me from time to time and my wife knows because (only if we’re at home), I’ll pause what we’re watching and begin to tell her what they should have done.  Yes, I’m that guy but only when it comes to my wife and I watching something alone.  Don’t worry, I won’t do that if we’re ever enjoying a night in with friends in front of the old flatscreen.  I’ll hold my tongue.

Back to “Moana”.  This hit me (the most recent episode of what I’ll call “viewer’s storytelling recalibration”) when in the beginning I realized we’ve sort of hit on what a lot of Disney, Dreamworks, etc. animated movies do.  How many times do we see the theme of the main character, who has a dream, want to fulfill that dream but authority figures in their lives prevent them from doing so “for their own good”.  Without jumping on any kind of soapbox, I will admit the theme of rebellion against parents is kind of overused here and maybe not the best thing to teach children.  I digress (let’s avoid that whole mess of moral discussion for the time being).  So my “VSR” episode took place when Moana wants to sail across the sea but cannot because her people do not do that.  They stay to their island.  Guess what, she sets sail anyway.  But my thoughts went in another direction instead and wondered why they can’t explore another theme like say…conquering fear?

I paused the movie and asked my wife, “Why can’t they have her (Moana) sail the ocean at a young age but fails and then becomes afraid of the ocean?  This prevents her from even going near the water.  Then, something happens and she has to sail in order to help her family/village/island.  Why don’t we see this theme in these wonderful animated features?

Maybe I’m off but I can’t help but feel this is a great theme to explore, especially for children.  Rather than saying to them, “you’re fearless and no one should stop you from your dreams,” why can’t they say, “you were fearless, you tried and failed and became afraid but there’s an opportunity in the future for you to conquer that fear”?

These thought processes are not always fun to deal with.  As I’ve stated before, my mind wanders to my stories all the time now and I begin to “plot” or consider scenarios.  This has spilled over into the movies/shows.  I feel doomed…  No, not really.  I take it as a sign that I’m always creating and looking at stories from other angles.  The hope is that I can recognize in my own writing to avoid the obvious path.  Too often, the story takes a turn to the left when I planned or expected it to go right.  These are great moments.

Call to Action:  Am I wrong about the theme I stated in “Moana” and other animated features?  Am I missing something?  Let me know.  Thanks for reading!

Identity: Theme Explored

Write what you know.  That’s what they tell you (I don’t know who they are…still looking to be honest).  For whatever the reason, I’ve struggled to really explain to people what my books are about.  Seriously.  If you asked me in person to tell you what the first Ravanguard book is about, I would struggle to do so without going into vast details in order to make sure you are tracking with me in what I consider a complex tapestry of interwoven major and minor story lines.  In short, I’ve had to narrow it down.  The book is about identity.

I’ve done this recently on a few accounts and simply saying identity helps me focus the vision.  The story follows the viewpoints of the three main characters and their struggle through identity.  All of these are explored through different methods.  One has their identity stripped away and must establish a new one, the second strives to make a name for herself in a predominantly male order, and the third (the youngest) has little knowledge of his family and their history, only to be introduced to secrets that make him realize who he is.

I like to think that you could take any of these three quick descriptions I’ve provided and apply them to a number of stories in all kinds of genres.  That’s the beauty of the theme of identity.  It is not restrictive or limited.

This is all very organic in my writing process.  I did not write these out and go from there.  No, I started with the character and their conflict and the theme of identity grew.  Imagine the smallest of frames–better yet, a bare Christmas tree.  I set it up and throughout the process of writing, editing, re-writing and editing some more, I’ve placed the ornaments, ribbon, tinsel (not just for decoration), etc. in their proper places to give the tree–or characters–identity.  Muscle and skin added to the skeleton once again.

Write what you know.  Well, much of my main point of view characters in everything I write has one underlying theme of identity.  My writing focuses on this because I truly believe individual identity is the key to success.  A character’s journey to discover/re-discover their identity and purpose in life is the quintessential most important conflict in literature (at least I think so).

So, I relate personally because I spent many years unsure of who I was, what my purpose was, etc.  Same old story…  It took time, patience and putting myself around people who saw the gold in me.  This righted much of the upside down thinking I struggled with as a young man.  Once I found what I was looking for, though, I settled within myself to be okay.  Were there things that could still use work?  Of course!

The theme of identity will likely be what I write about the rest of my life.  My hope is that this will transcend the pages and help people.  Obviously, I cannot tell every reader who they are but hopefully, through my characters, readers will find tools that make sense to them and lead them to discover what’s most important.

Call to Action: If you are struggling with identity in any capacity, I would encourage you to not lose sight or hope.  Don’t merely look for others to tell you who you are.  Do not seek acceptance or relationships because someone else thinks you should be this or that.  Ask questions.  Pursue the truth of your convictions.  These will better guide you in the long run.

Kill the Cliché, Twist the Trope: Magical MacGuffin

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 2

There are conventions in fantasy literature that we know well, maybe to a lesser degree if you’re not an avid fan or reader, but you can recognize them with ease.  You can be reading/watching a story unfold, snap your fingers and say, “That’s so and so in this story…” or “I bet that’s what’s needed to solve…”  How?  Why?  Because you’ve seen it done so much, your brain does its magic and the dots are connected, always aware and finding the patterns.  These conventions that are easy to call are often clichés or tropes.

I relied too heavily on these clichés/tropes when I first dabbled in the genre and to be honest, it was good because it helped me understand and know what I wanted to avoid later in my journey as a writer.  For today’s post, I’m going to explore another one (don’t be surprised if this becomes a monthly post-type by the way).

The Magical MacGuffin.  What’s this?  Well, it’s the One Ring in Lord of the Rings, the Holy Grail pursued by Indiana Jones or King Arthur, and/or most recently, any of the Infinity Stones in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  A MacGuffin in literary terms is a plot device pursued by the protagonist to form the basis of the plot.  Now, these devices don’t always have to be magical.  You could literally take any story (from a book, play, tv show or film) and find the MacGuffin.  It could be a goal, dream, desire, object, idea, etc.  All of these fill the role.  Honestly, I don’t have a problem with the device as a whole but in fantasy, it is (in my opinion) a cliché/trope worth avoiding.

In the second book I wrote (one that has been shelved for the time being), I actually tried to take this trope and twist it.  I asked the question, “What if the magical objects in the world suddenly quit working, forcing the societies that relied on them to deal with the resulting conflicts that would naturally ensue?”  A malfunction of the MacGuffin if you will.  Now, this is an idea worth exploring and I may still do it to a degree but on a lesser scale.  Maybe a standalone novel…  There are elements in that world that I created and quite like a lot and don’t completely want to abandon.  Hmmmmm…  Yep, you’ve read it here first.  I may have just realized I do in fact have another story to put in my queue!

Back to the topic.  I struggle to get behind the idea of a Magical MacGuffin because its played out in fantasy.  Tolkien did it the best with the One Ring.  We have a magical item that is in fact filled with the evil of the main antagonist who wants it back.  The goal of the protagonists is to take that item to the only place where it can be destroyed (which happens to be in the most dangerous place in Middle Earth) all the while having to avoid its influence and the desire of others who want to claim it for themselves.  It’s actually a very good device used by Tolkien and plays better in the story as an item to destroy rather than attain.  Kudos to the master!

What we see since then is a lot of stories that drive the plot forward with magical items being the end goal (a sword, crown, horn, bowl, knickknack or patty whack).  Once attained, it usually gives the hero the power to overcome the evil one.  There are usually obstacles that bring lessons learned and help the character grow but for me, both as a reader and writer, to form an entire plot on the magical device, just doesn’t hold my attention.  When looking for new books to read, I actually check to see if the synopsis includes a Magical MacGuffin.  If so, I set it aside.

Thankfully, there is a wave happening in fantasy literature that doesn’t rely on this particular device.  Maybe there are magical items in the world but they are not the bones to hold everything up.  In my Ravanguard series, there are things that could be considered magical but play no major significance to the overall conflict.  I do introduce something that may look the part in the early chapters but as you read, you realize I’ve twisted the expectation of the convention.  The story centers around the three main point of views and their inner struggles to cope with a world that is turned onto its side.  They must rely on themselves and those they trust in order to survive.

I should be clear and say I’m not opposed to a Magical MacGuffin entirely in a story so long as there is a twist or subversion.  Let there be a price to pay in order to use it.  The One Ring actually does this.  Using it makes the wielder dependent and a slave to it.  That’s good!  To compare, consider the Goblet of Fire in the fourth Harry Potter book.  It’s a magical item that is the goal to attain.  Why?  Harry has to because he’s in the contest but what else?  I won’t spoil the book or movie but at least there’s a twist at the end that does extend the overall saga as a whole.  This is also good!

Maybe you prefer this convention for whatever the reason.  Not a bad thing.  We’re just different and have different tastes, which is great, fine and dandy.  Hopefully, that won’t keep you from reading my books (Ha!).  Happy reading!

Call to Action: Do you prefer Magical MacGuffin’s in stories?  If so, share them with me!  I’m always curious to read other people’s preferences and opinions.  Are there any that have been twisted and subverted that you enjoyed?

On This Day: National Tell a Fairy Tale Day (US)

This a bit of a fun OTD post.  So, here in the US, it is National Tell a Fairy Tale Day.  What I’ve decided to do is give everyone here a little treat.  In my Ravanguard series, there are fairy tales or rather, “night tales” as I call them in the series.  I don’t explore them in the actual novellas or novels but they are referenced.  Hope you’ve got your coffee and cake ready while I share the tale of the “The Lamb in the Hill”.

The boy from the Prenian hills loved little but cared most for his lamb whose snowy coat never faded.  Charged by his father to watch and protect the lamb from all possible threats, the boy took his responsibility serious.  He believed if he kept the lamb safe from wolves and other predators, his father would grant him a new responsibility at the family’s farm where he would learn to sheer and spin the valuable wool.

On a day where there was nothing to distinguish itself from the rest, the boy lost sight of the lamb as it grazed upon a hill.  Fear did not find itself in the boy, having come to trust the lamb and its willingness to stay close.  As he approached the other side of the hill, a song hummed to celebrate the day, an odd fellow waved at him.  The boy rarely met others in the fields of Prenia but waved in response.

“A beauteous day is one not to forget, young lad,” the odd fellow said.

The boy did not respond at first, taking in the odd clothing of the odd fellow, garbed in trousers and shirt made of black and silver silks.  Baubles of gold glittered at the ends of his shoes, wrists and the triangular hat upon his head.  The truly peculiar thing about the odd fellow, though, was his great height, slender frame and rock-like features of his face.  What first seemed to be wrinkles were in fact rocky crags.  From brow to chin, the odd fellow’s face marked him a creature the boy did not know.

There was some sense of danger as they stood across from one another.  The boy came out of his scrutiny of the odd fellow and noticed his lamb missing.  “Sir, have you seen my lamb?  He has the whitest coat one could imagine.  Snowy and brilliant, shining in the daylight sun.”

The odd fellow scratched his chin.  “I’m afraid I’ve taken your lamb, boy, for I have been traveling a great many days.”

Tears did not cease from the boy’s eyes at the horrible reveal.  His fear induced by the realization that his father would surely punish him both by word and hand.  The lamb was his to protect and he failed before he had known there was a problem.

The odd fellow took notice of the boy’s distress and quickly felt the need to repay for his misdeed.  These were his ways unlike some of his misguided kin.  “Good lad, do not cry,” he pleaded, “for I have a rare and magnificent gift.  I can find the greatest of treasures in the earth.  Come and see!”

The boy stood in place, heart broken but watching the odd fellow scan the earth of the hillside at their feet for several seconds.

“Aha!” the odd fellow exclaimed.  He dropped to his knees and with ease placed his hands into the earth like he was dipping his fingers into the water of a lake.  Out his hands came and in them he held a great sword.  It was unlike any other.  Old but gleaming made by a long-dead blacksmith.  “Here,” the odd fellow said, sword extended.  “Take it and you will cast down great enemy hordes with a single strike!”

The boy did not dare take such a weapon for he did not trust the odd fellow.  “Sir, I am untrained.  How could I face a rival but fail to control such a heavy blade?”

The odd fellow considered the sword.  “I see you are frail in the ways of a warrior.  I agree and will offer another gift.”  The odd fellow placed the sword on the ground, stood and roamed until he dropped to his knees again.

A second time, the odd fellow pressed his hands into the earth as if it was cream, easy to separate and search through.  His hands came out again and he held in his hands a flute of ivory.  The odd fellow brought it to his lips and blew the excess dirt from its core.  “Here,” he said.  “Take it and control the clouds above, able to bring rain or sunshine whenever you need it!”

The boy did not take the flute.  “Sir,” he said, “I am untrained.  How could I learn the notes to control the weather and make better my days?”

Once again, the odd fellow felt a blow to settle his debt.  He laid the flute down and looked all around the hillside.  “Boy,” he confessed, “I am at a loss.  What do you require to be satisfied by my misdeed?”

The boy considered the question and found only one answer to satisfy his desire.  “Surely, sir, you did not take my lamb for its coat.  Surely, you can give me that at least so I can return it to my father.  At least then, it can be woven and sold so that our investment will not go wasted.”

The odd fellow rubbed his pointed chin.  “A fair request.”  He turned to where the boy had first laid eyes on him and reached into the earth.  Out came his hands and in them he held the lamb, the animal shaking but alive as its coat was dark from the earth.

“That is not my lamb,” the boy said.  “For that one is not white.”

The odd fellow shook his head and searched all around him with the lamb in his arms.

In the moment of opportunity, the boy took up the sword and swung its mighty blade, cleaving the head of the odd fellow, having saved all his strength to make one attempt at the creature.  The lamb fell to the ground and ran to the boy, snowy coat smeared with the dirt of the earth.

The boy walked over to the flute, hummed as he always did and played notes until the clouds formed overhead.  Rain fell and washed the lamb clean.  The boy considered the body of the odd fellow and left it to wither, serving always as a reminder that the lamb could not be left out of his sight.

Call to Action: What’s your favorite fairy tale?  Post a comment and share!

Keeping the Creative Juices Flowing Pt 1

posted in: Writing | 0

I thought it would be fun to discuss some of these and share my own methods, experiences, practices.

Let’s start with #21 first.  Listening to music is essential for me.  Ever since I can remember, I’ve listened to music and a wide range of genres over the years.  It would be somewhat embarrassing to list these phases but I will say, I try to be open to all styles, forms and expressions.  My iTunes library is a ridiculous smorgasbord of artists that drives my wife crazy.  One song is the melancholy melodies of Bon Iver and the next is thrashing guitars and drums of A Day to Remember.  We like what we like.  I gravitate towards music.  I can always listen to Cold War Kids, City and Colour and Mumford and Sons, especially when I’m writing.

#40 is next.  Be curious.  This has been my go to lately when I just need unwind.  I will often go to Wikipedia and peruse the “Did you know…” section where there’s tons of random trivia on everything from history to the arts.  Really interesting stuff to be sifted through.  I also listen to a lot of podcasts that focus on movies, sports and politics.  Every day, I seem to hear a name or term that I am unfamiliar with and research.  I love being informed about things so this definitely helps me creatively.

Last, let’s go with #5.  I try to socialize more as I get older.  I’ve never been the center of attention or wanted to be really.  I prefer smaller circles of get togethers and really build relationships one on one.  My wife and I enjoy meeting up with other couples and playing games and just talking.  So many topics are explored and we really open ourselves up to be known and get to know others.  Building relationships with others benefits creativity because to know others is to expand the mind.

Call to Action: Take a look at this list and pick some out that you want to do more.  Share if you want too!  I’d love to hear form all of you.

Don’t Pass on Your Passion

posted in: Writing | 2
 
Passion is the fire that burns a new trail in the wilderness of confusion and conformity.

It’s a good one today.  My wife and I recently watched La La Land and while the film itself is wonderful and worth the time to enjoy, I was berated through the viewing to think about passion.  What is it and why is it so important to have?

I won’t spoil the movie but I do recommend seeing it.  Passion is a theme that runs through the veins of each of the main leads.  I took notice of this and knew I wanted to explore it a little in regards to who I am as a creative.

All creatives have an innate desire to see their works brought to completion.  A painter or sculptor envisions the material they are using to be formed into the image they’ve fashioned in their mind’s eye.  Musicians hear the music/song and set forth in putting the notes together until it is finished.  Passion is what drives these actions.

We know what passion can lead to when left unchecked and ignored.  Violence and horrible events can easily be attributed to a hateful passion to see others harmed for ones own or a collective’s benefit.  These are not what we strive to birth or maintain.

Healthy passions though should bring about beauty and joy (and sparkly unicorns sliding down rainbows into a sea of melted chocolate).  The artist’s passion should evoke emotion and appeal to the senses.  Whether positive or negative (as in sadness or loss), this type of passion benefits rather than castigates those caught in the swell.

For myself, I have a great passion to tell stories.  I have other sub-passions like playing music or cooking savory roasts but to tell a story–one that appeals to more people than a small demographic–is my greatest desire.  Any time I allow someone to read my writing, I have this great twirl in my spirit to hear that they loved what they read (just being honest).  If not, well then I’ll just put them on the shun list.  Seriously though, artists want to be verified in what they do–praised for the efforts of their passion.

(Segway start) While this is not always the case, it’s important to learn and manage yourself if you do face criticism or scrutiny.  It’s not the end of the world when those types of feedback come.  My advice: don’t put your sense of value in the hands of another person who may or may not like what you’ve created.  It’s okay to not have fans.  There’s a lot of people in the world and I think you’ll find plenty who support and hold you in high regard for your creative output.  Passion killed by criticism is a sign of that passion’s strength or lack thereof.  Too many people are broken–dreams shattered–because of criticism.  Don’t be one of these. (Segway end)

Where was I?  Oh.  Sometimes passion is put in a sort of dormant state.  This happened to me for a few years while I struggled through life after high school (Eating Del Taco just about every day will affect more than your waistline).  I wrote but my desire to do so and to produce something I was passionate about just could not be mustered.  I think it took some of those “hard to learn” lessons in life for me to get out of my funk and re-prioritize my life.  When I did, the passion erupted and I was back on track writing like man bent on accomplishment.

(Does this increasingly come off more and more like an inspirational rant?  Yes?  Good!  Nah, I just want to be helpful where I can.  Passion is something I can articulate to you.  If you want a college classroom-worthy lecture on literature, then well this is not the place.  I must admit, I was only “passing” when it came to literature in school.  I didn’t see what the professors/teachers thought I should see.)

To close this loop, maintaining passion requires effort.  A conscious decision has to be made (maybe even every day for some people) in order to reach the goal.  Find what keeps the fires burning and be prudent to do what’s necessary to keep the heat up.  I’ve witnessed others let their dreams and desires fizzle out into an ashy heap, but the embers are still there buried beneath if you look.  Keep it stoked!

Call to Action: If you have a rejection letter or negative comments about whatever it is your passionate about, put them aside for awhile.  They can be good to keep for motivation but I think positive feedback can have similar effects on you as a burgeoning creative.  Find those praises and inspiring elements and put them up along with your personal goals.  Look beyond the tightrope, look to the other side.

My Trick to Great Writing (Shhhh, Don’t Tell)

posted in: Writing | 0

This is a bit of an admission post and a look into who I am as a person.  Want to know the real me?  Then you’re going to get these kinds of posts from time to time.  It’s related though to writing because, well, I am me and I happen to be a writer.  Shocker!

I can’t tell you how many resources there are out there with great and not so great writing help.  I’ve combed through a lot of this over the years and found some great and wonderful aids to learn and better myself as a writer.  Check out my Resources page to see the books I recommend.

What I’d like to do here is sort of explore what I’ve found to be the most critical part of my development as a writer/storyteller.

Come in real close…too close!  Back a bit up (is that rosemary?).  My secret is simply this: observe.

Confetti!!!

Observe?  Huh?  Yes, observe.

I spent a great deal of my childhood spending time by myself.  I had a group of close friends and I was completely socially awkward.  Not at first, at least, but once puberty hit, the oh so flattering changes happened (back-ne being one of my most traumatic flourishes of hormones).  I became more and more withdrawn.  I was athletic enough to pass for a decent basketball player but my lack of surpassing five and half feet in height dampened any starry-eyed dreams of playing at the collegiate level and beyond.

As I’ve said, high school was the time I first dabbled with writing.  I won’t retread that again but I realized later in life that during my adolescence, I had a knack for observing the world around me without really contributing much to it.  I watched people and who they were when it came to conflicts, struggles, joys and victories.  Those things have stayed with me!  And I continue to observe the world in this manner with more intent on paying attention to the details.

Writing a good story means you have to have great characters who go beyond the clichés and tropes of the hero/anti-hero/villain motif.  Real characters who jump off the page and seem like someone you could actually see alive in the real world only comes by observing and understanding people in real life.  I learned without trying to.

To observe is to stand back and watch unobjectively (not a word, but you know what I mean).  I have my own experiences and therefore have my own opinions, convictions, dreams and desires.  However, as a writer, unless I’m writing a story with only one character or a story filled with similar characters (dullsville!), then I need to understand people who are not like me at all.  Who honestly wants to read a book where all the characters are the hero?  I call BS because that’s not a story.  It’s barely a premise (or is it?).

My struggles in social settings while growing up helped me later in life.  I was the kid who did not care to be the focus of the room but I did take notice of the other people and studied without ever realizing I was preparing myself for my future.

I seriously encourage all people (not just writers, but you all should try this more) to take a step back and simply observe from afar.  Don’t be creepy about it; have some tact.  It’s amazing the things you learn from watching people.  You will pick up the most interesting tidbits about behavior by doing so.  And behavior is what writers work with.  When a character is put up against an unexpected conflict, their reaction or behavior is based on so many factors: history, upbringing, fears, prejudices, etc.

Observe the world before judging it.  Let this be a common practice we all take part in for our future.

Call to action: Go to a public place (mall, park, beach) and watch.  Learn some things about strangers and what makes them different based on their behaviors.  By the way, if you go to a beach, it’s less creepy to people watch if you’re wearing sunglasses.

National Compliment Day

posted in: Writing | 5


So I just learned it was National Compliment Day and I thought it was perfect to share this message from my wonderful, amazing sister.  She sent this to me recently out of nowhere and it was so honoring.

“Here’s the thing… I’m not a writer, but my incredibly talented, writer of a brother has inspired me to do some, ‘writing’….

I’ve watched him ‘tinker’ with writing and story telling from high school until now (let’s keep it brief and say 15 years’ish). But here’s what I didn’t know, that in all those years of him behind his laptop and sharing a chapter here and there with people, he was preparing and training. By training I don’t mean dabbling, losing interest, and then moving on to the next shiny thing. That’s what I do. I’m a dreamer and a visionary but I have no follow through (but this is not about me). If I’ve ever seen a man of follow through, it is my brother Adam Henderson. Without too many personal details, my brother has had a passion, for music and writing (for as long as I can remember). He’d go for it, and then be told by people that he looked up to at the time, ‘That’s cool.’ ‘It’s ok.’ ‘Cool man.’ Not what someone wants to hear who just poured their soul into something. Those times I’m sure he recoiled for a bit, but this resilient mother effer didn’t stop. He continued, took notes, when I’m sure it hurt sometimes, whether constructive or negative criticism, he kept on truckin’.

Fast forward to the present, years have gone by, life has transpired, living and existing as we do, self involved. But heres the wake up — recently he started a blog, and to say the least my jaw dropped at his first post. This fool has been seasoning… in the dark, in the shadows, when nobody was the wiser. He’s been writing and editing, and writing and editing, and researching, and researching. He’s been reading and studying all the literary legends he loves, gleaning every morsel! I had no idea the repertoire and the range he’d acquired in all these years of being my humble, sweet, and kind brother. The greatest part, is that this is just the opener, the dawning, the preface, the mist on the horizon of blowing your freaking mind. Dot, dot, dot. Though this blog (and shared passion) of his is new, and in its infancy, I’m already so inspired and motivated by the man (and incredible writer) he has become. I can NOT wait to read what happens next…”

Again, this is from my sister and such a great encouraging compliment.  She is herself an amazing creative who paints, dances, sings, and is an overall kick ass cosmetologist.  Check her out on Instagram at randacuts and be amazed!

Your Fantasy Reading Guide

posted in: Writing | 0

This post was influenced by a trip to Barnes and Noble in San Luis Obispo’s wonderful downtown area.  Both my brother-in-laws and I roamed a few of the streets, hitting a record store (Boo Boo Records.  Go there if you have a chance!), a used book store that was so irresistibly messy with full shelves and the overflow of stacked books serving as paperback end caps, and finally the B&N.

We looked around and eventually came across the fiction section and then the Fantasy/Sci-Fi section.  One of my BILs asked what would be a good book to read just to read in general fiction.  I struggled to give much of a recommendation but when we stumbled into the aisle of my preferred genre, I was quick to offer recommendations if they were interested.

That escapade brings me here.  I cannot say for certain who comes to read my blog (family and friends are quick to visit and I appreciate that greatly.  Encourage your friends to as well and feel free to leave comments), but I have a feeling (if I’m wrong, then please forgive me) that there might be some curiosity as to what I might recommend to readers for their fantasy interests.

So here we are!  Continue reading and I’ll provide some recommendations based on my extensive reading of the Fantasy genre.  I’ll also help provide some key themes and terms that (once again, please forgive me if wrong) may not be familiar.

Fantasy as a genre has been around a good many years.  Modern fantasy is a bit of a mixed bag depending on preferences.  For classics, I would be remiss to not steer you in the direction of Tolkien and C.S. Lewis.  Both of these authors had a grasp of the genre that has greatly influenced just about every work to date in some form or another.

I can only recommend what I’ve read, so please don’t jump and claw at my face if there’s something you disagree with or don’t see.  Rather, throw out recommendations in a comment.  In no particular order of preference, length, popularity or any other critiquing factor, here we go!

The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan (and completed by Brandon Sanderson) – If you read my previous On This Day post, then you’ve already been given some background info on this particular series.  Wonderful characters and world building with a complex and impressive magic system that plays a role in the story.  I would qualify this as a High Magic series which in general terms simply means the magic system is vast and influential throughout.

A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R.R. Martin – I admit, I’ve only read the first two books of this series and will eventually return to it and finish once it’s been completed.  You can watch the show but be denied the complexity of plots and subplots Martin has woven throughout.  In comparison, this would be considered Low-Mid fantasy due to the downplay of magic.  It’s evident but not pertinent to the story.  The characters drive the story and are the reason to invest your time.  Note: If you’re put off by extreme violence and sex, you probably want to be wary.

The Mistborn series by Brandon Sanderson – Epic in the sense that it feels grander in a shorter amount of total pages.  The first trilogy is where to start.  He has continued the story with a new trilogy that takes place centuries ahead of the first.  This is the series to read if you love inventive, imaginative magic systems.  Sanderson created such a magnificent system that screams of being adapted to film in the future.  Part crime caper and part chosen one story, you’ll love what he does to introduce tropes in the genre only to turn them on their head in ways that keep you reading well into the night and ignoring your bedtime.

The Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson – Epic by all definitions.  Characters, world(s), magic, plot twists and turns.  Nothing is more vast than this series.  I struggled with it due to the complexity of the writing but highly recommend it despite that.  It’s truly mesmerizing in its scope and goal.

The Drenai Saga by David Gemmel – Hero fantasy.  Best way to put it.  The saga follows a singular hero and his many journeys in life.  The best of the best who survives against extreme odds.  There’s a fair amount of violence, some sex and even some humor.  Legend, the first book of the saga is a good introduction to the genre of fantasy.

The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss – Easily one of the best out there.  Rothfuss spent years honing his craft.  There’s a type of lyrical flow to his writing that keeps you trapped in the world of Kvothe (pronounce K-woeth) who is a musician first and wizard/magician second.  Amazing writing and world explored in a first person narrative.

The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie – Given the credit for being one of the forbearers of the most recent boom of what’s aptly called Grimdark Fantasy, this series is dark, violent, and depressing.  Characters are grey.  Heroes and villains are not denied vices and the “good guys” don’t necessarily win by the last page of these books.  Still, I recommend it to anyone who enjoys the genre and would like to leave behind the clichés and tropes so many other series seem to get trapped in.

The Discworld series by Terry Pratchet – Want to laugh?  Then read this one.  Pratchett takes his readers on a ride through a witty, dry world that takes place on the back of terrestrial turtle shell (yes, you read that right).  With dozens of books in the series, you can read about the misadventures and quests of wizards, witches, Death, city watchmen and more in this instantaneous favorite.  Listening to these in audiobook format is equally fun.

The Long Price Quartet by Daniel Abraham – This ones less familiar in most circles but a very good series of Low Fantasy.  The magic system is unique and while it plays an integral role in the plot, it does not overshadow the characters.

The Chronicles of the Black Company by Glen Cook  – Preceding Joe Abercrombie, this series was Grimdark before the term was invented.  It follows a mercenary unit of soldiers caught up in a mess of twists and turns where they do all they can to survive.  Great world, characters and magic.  One of my personal favorites.

Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling – While I was not allowed to read this series growing up, as an adult, I tried it out and fell in love with the characters and world.  I call this High Imagination.  I am not convinced this series is suitable for children as it explores very dark themes and elements throughout but I believe it’s a great work that explores the journey of adolescence into adulthood.  Whatever your feelings are towards it, it’s worth reading.


Call to Action: Recommend a book or series to me!  It doesn’t have to be Fantasy or even fiction.  Share with me something you’ve read and loved!

How’s It Going To Be

posted in: Writing | 0

Do you hear Third Eye Blind when you read that title?  No?  Drat.  How about now?!

Quick Edit: This is the last post about my transition to blogging.  Thank my wife for telling me to move on.  I apologize.  Back to the show!!!I thought I’d provide some transparency to everyone.  This blog will be an evolving entity as I continue to explore my schedule and the content I want to blog about.  I have some ideas but I know I don’t have the proven victorious method for successful blog writing quite yet.  I’m researching and probably going to take some chances and make some mistakes.  I’m okay with that and I hope those of you who continue to come here to read my words will stick with me.

That is not to say I’m newborn lamb, struggling to learn to walk.  I’m more than confident that I can undertake this new endeavor and conquer the hill.

My hope is to provide weekly/monthly posts with related topics that will appeal to writers and other creatives (new word I’ve come across and it’s going to become part of our lexicon!  If selfie can, then surely “creatives” can as well).

Other topics will creep in because honestly, I’m interested in so many things.  Some of these are best for bonding over and creating new friendships and some can be described as divisive subjects (like creamy or crunchy peanut butter–those topics wars are fought over).  These will be few and far between but everyone will learn quickly that I approach these topics at different angles than the more stringent folk.

To recap, this blog will explore from a writer’s perspective.  That’s the best way I can say it.  For example, let’s shift gears and switch to my love for writing.

Why do I write?  No better answer than to say I must.  Characters and the worlds they live within, surrounded by conflicts and desires, cannot be kept trapped in the imaginative mind (try and it gets messier than an outdoor Mumford and Sons concert in the rain).

For those who may not write, I’ll explain as best as I can while those who can and do write will be nodding in agreement.  We who write actually develop stories whether by a scene or in full as if we are playing with legos, putting brick by boring brick (Ha! A Paramore reference) into place, envisioning the final machination well ahead of the last piece being pressed into place.  There are no instructions though.

Each lego piece is a word and little by little we writers take each one and place them in the proper (not always perfect but proper) order until we’re finished.  However, satisfaction is not always there so we may dismantle what we’ve formed and add a few new pieces to make the finished product exactly what we want.  That’s all it is.  We write and form a story into what we want.  Whether or not others agree or like the final result, it’s not up to us.  It’s what we’ve envisioned and therefore created and gifted to the world–or in our case: readers.

I say all of this to bring one more point around (and I’ll explore it more in the future).  A writer should never seek to write something loved and cherished by all.  Frankly, there’s just too many damn people in the world to please!  Not going to happen.  Better yet, a writer should set out to write the story only they can tell and give it to those who’ve been waiting for it.  Seek to impact just one soul for the better and your goal will be worth it.  Impacting more than the one is just icing on the cake.

Call to Action: Legos, Lincoln Logs, or K’NEX?  I played with all and those who can somehow combine all three are gods of the playroom.