Flash Fiction: Blood in the Current


The smell of so many people moving in close proximity of each other day and night overwhelmed the sounds of voices, carts, and animals.  Chasiel had given up covering up her nose or breathing through her mouth among the mass of unwashed bodies.

Her wounds kept her off her feet and Fenroe paid a less than cordial cooper for her to sit on the end of his wagon as staves and iron hoops filled most of the open bed.  With a dirty blanket wrapped around her, she kept quiet and strayed from attracting unwanted attention.

Fenroe walked close by, wrapped in his own dingy cloak to hide his light armor and weapons.  His bruised face drew plenty of glances though.  “This is becoming a bloated bunch,” the mercenary said without looking at her.  He kept a vigilant watch for anyone who might recognize them.  Men of the Silver Way could still be out there looking.

“Seems to be a mix of fools for a political meeting,” she said quietly, holding back the coo sound that would follow.  She was still the Bloody Dove but preferred to keep anonymous in light of her injuries.

“Just clingers looking to leach on whatever comes of this mess.”  He stared off at a pair of well-dressed men approaching from the countryside, seeming to join the herd.  “We should find work easily.  Once that back wound of yours heals up, we’ll give our blades over to the highest bidder.”

Prime for violence, blood could flow if the wrong people thought the mass of travelers was weak.  For Chasiel, not having to see or smell blood for a long time would do just fine.  She and Fenroe were the last of their band.  The Shivering Souls were no more and if Fenroe had any inclinations to build the band up again, she would not join him.

The mercenary life no longer appealed to her.  Killing no longer appealed to her and yet in the current of bodies she found herself in, Chasiel could practically smell the potential bloodshed coming.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Exodus Parts 1 and 2

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We’ve made it to the end!  Oh man… This endeavor has been tougher than I anticipated.  If you’ve followed alongside me for this rewatch, then I commend your patience especially if Lost is unknown to you or not your cup of tea.  I’ve tried to format this long finale in a comprehensive way without sticking too much to the weeds. I wanted to hit the major points and moments, and brush off the fluff.  We know these characters pretty well by now so the minor moments are omitted. Let’s go!

Walt wakes up in the morning and goes to do his business when he sees Rousseau walking around and entering the camp.  He wakes up Michael and before we know it, everyone is enthralled by this stranger they’ve no doubt heard of but never seen.  Sayid interacts with her, just as surprised by her visit and she tells them the Others are coming.


Left in confusion, Rousseau explains that after her team was on the island a week, she had her baby, the Others lit a fire inland that released a pillar of black smoke, and then they came to steal her baby, Alex.

There’s not a lot to take from Rousseau’s warning as Jack and Locke seem to question the validity of her claim.  Jack’s focus is the raft and Michael tells him they need everyone working to launch that day. Jack makes that happen but as things go awry while trying to guide the raft into the water, Walt calls out for everyone to look at a pillar of black smoke inland (well, that’s not good).

Taking Rousseau’s warning more to heart, Jack thinks the hatch is their best shot at hiding and providing protection for all forty members of their group.  They take Rousseau to the hatch but she’s never seen anything like it in all her time on the island. Sayid continues to argue against going inside but Locke asks Rousseau about the explosives she used to rig her hideout.  She tells them that if they mean to use the dynamite, then they must leave immediately to reach the Black Rock where she got it from.

Flashbacks:  All the flashbacks for the finale show our survivors the day of Flight 815.  We see a lot of moments that are good but not important to the central plot. It more so shows us who they were before crashing onto the island.  There’s been a lot of growth in some and little in others. All in all, it shows us they were strangers before the flight and ended up together, putting hope and trust (most of the time) in each other in order to survive their circumstances.

Jack puts together a team to go to the Black Rock which includes Locke, Kate, Hurley, and our weather man from the previous episode, Arzt, who learns from Hurley about the dynamite.  He convinces Jack to let him tag along because he knows how unstable dynamite is and knows how to handle it. He leaves everyone else to help with the raft launching. We get some goodbye moments but the most important is between Jack and Sawyer.  Jack hands over one of the guns so Sawyer has some protection for the raft and Sawyer tells Jack about a man he met in Sydney. He conveys Christian’s remorse and love for Jack and it absolutely helps Jack have closure (such a good moment).

Rousseau leads the group to the “dark territory” which is where the Black Rock is and she mentions one of her crew mates losing his arm.  This leads Arzt to turn back, changing his mind quickly. He doesn’t get far though after the group hears him whooping (this is the best word I can think to describe the sounds he makes) and tells them to run.  Soon after, our friend the monster starts pulling up trees making its weird mechanical growling sounds. Everyone runs besides Locke, who tells Hurley it won’t hurt them (hmm, yeah okay). Rousseau leads the others into a group of trees to hide and when Kate asks about it, our she states the monster is a security system meant to protect the island (interesting…).


When Rousseau finally gets them to the Black Rock, the group is flabbergasted because the Black Rock is in fact an old timey ship.  No, seriously, it’s a ship in the middle of the jungle!

Back on the beach, the final touches to the raft are being set in place.  Walt leaves Vincent with Shannon because he helped Walt when his mom died.  Sayid installs the salvaged radio equipment on the raft, giving instructions when and how long to use.  Sun and Jin reconcile and she gives him a parting gift of phonetically written out words to help him learn English.  The raft launches without another hitch and there’s much joy and happiness (yay!).


Before leaving the group at the Black Rock, Rousseau tells them where to find the dynamite.  Hurley and Arzt stay outside the scary ghost ship while the others go inside and find many fun things: skeletons chained to the hull, mining tools, and dynamite!  Yep, looks like the Black Rock was a slavers ship. When Jack and Locke get one of the crates of explosives outside, Arzt freaks out. He then gives them a history lesson on dynamite and instability and wraps a stick in muddy cloth to stabilize it.  Then he explodes. No, really. Not making this up. Arzt gets blown to smithereens. That just happened! That leaves the group to reluctantly follow his lead and wrap several sticks (very carefully) and separate them into different packs and return to the hatch slowly but quickly.  Time is against them. Remember, the Others are coming!

Everyone on the beach is packing and getting ready to make their way to the caves.  Claire’s having a tough time with her baby crying and being stressed herself. Charlie wants to help and eventually goes to Sayid to request a gun (Jack left Sayid in charge of the gun case) but gets denied one and goes back to help Claire.  Rousseau must have booked it because she shows up and tells Charlie she needs to talk to Sayid. Charlie runs off to get Sayid and they overhear a commotion shortly after. Turns out Rousseau knocked Claire out and took the baby! What?! (yeah, this show gets crazy in these last episodes).  Charlie and Sayid run to get the guns and then head off to track down Rousseau. Claire tries to go too but can’t and begs Charlie to get Aaron back. Who? Yep, she finally named her baby in that strenuous moment.

The rafters are doing what they do, realizing the true size of the island, and almost lose the rudder to a piece of driftwood.  Michael and Jin have come a long way and seem to have become friends. Jin gives Michael the watch (remember that thing?) and they try the transceiver equipment but get nothing.  A funny moment takes place while Sawyer reads notes written for loved ones and he wonders who Hugo is and how he has 160 million dollars.


Jack’s group is making progress back through the dark territory but things get weird fast when Jack and Kate hear some kind of chittering sound and see what can best be described as a fast moving black smokish thing.  Trees get pulled up in the distance and everyone runs again except for Locke who moves towards the chaos. When a tree gets pulled up right next to him, we see terror replace his curiosity. He gets up and runs but eventually gets grabbed by the leg and dragged.  Before being pulled into a pit of some sort, Jack catches him and calls for Kate to throw some dynamite inside the pit. Locke pleads to be let go, believing he won’t be hurt but Jack refuses. The explosion is deep and in response, the smoke thing we saw earlier rises up and flees.  Yep, that’s the monster. It’s some kind of smoke-like entity to which the fans call “Smokey”. I wish my description could be more menacing but it is what it is.


Sayid and Charlie stop to rest briefly at the beach craft Boone climbed into.  Sayid gives Charlie the run down of the plane and points out the Virgin Mary statues filled with drugs (oh no!).  Charlie’s face says it all as he’s sober and suddenly come into the mother-load. Running again, they come across a blanketed bundle.  Charlie goes for it and in doing so trips a trap that drops stones on his head. Sayid fixes him up using gunpowder to cauterize the wound on his head.  When they finally get to the source of the Others’ pillar of smoke, they find no one there but hear Aaron crying. Rousseau hands over the baby, hoping to have made a trade for her daughter, and says she heard the whispers of the Others saying they were coming for the child, for the boy.

It’s nighttime on the raft and Sawyer turns the transmitter on.  They get a blip on the radar and after arguing, Michael eventually gives in and shoots the signal flare.  The blip moves away but eventually comes back into range and as the rafters wait, a spotlight turns on. The boat is small but there are four people aboard asking questions.  Michael tells them who they are and the leader on the other boat shifts suddenly and says they are going to have to take the boy (aha! Rousseau was not lying!). A scuffle takes place resulting in Sawyer getting shot, Michael and Jin going overboard, Walt being taken, and an explosion destroying the raft.  We watch in shock as the boat drives off with Walt screaming for help and Michael in the water unable to do so.

Finally back at the hatch, the group starts to place the dynamite around the hatch to blow the door.  There’s a great moment between Jack and Locke where they discuss a difference in philosophy with Jack being a man of science and Locke being a man of faith.  Locke believes they were brought to the island to serve a purpose; it’s their destiny to be there and the answer is in the hatch. Jack disagrees and cares only about keeping their people safe.


After Hurley takes the backup sticks of dynamite a safe distance away, he walks to join the group as they prepare to light the fuse.  Dropping his flashlight, Hurley sees the numbers on the side of the hatch and does everything he can to put out the fuse after Locke lights it.  The explosives go off and the door is off. Jack and Locke look down and we get the iconic camera pan down and away from them as the first season of Lost ends.

Woo!!!  Yep, we’ve made it!!!  Okay, I hope you’ve enjoyed this rewatch.  I am actually going to continue watching the show (without recapping though; no more).  My next blog post will be the latest Shoals to the Hallowed flash fiction piece. After that, we will see where to go.  I’ve got some announcements coming and I’ll try to figure out how and when I want to share those. Thanks again! It’s been fun, exhausting, and special to rewatch Lost Season 1 with you.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Born to Run

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Flashback:  The episode starts with in a Flashback where we get to see a blonde Kate showing up to a roadside motel with a trunk full of different license plates.  She sneaks into a vacated room, dyes her hair back to brunette, and afterwards collects a letter delivered under a pseudonym. She reads the letter in her car and cries regarding the content.  More on that to come.

Kate’s looking at the toy airplane (answers to that are coming) when Charlie shows up with his guitar, believing out loud that Drive Shaft’s albums have probably reached Platinum in sales due to his tragic “death” and plots his return to shock the world.  This optimism is due to the raft working and bringing a rescue. Kate seems to be on the fence. They are drawn to the raft as a raised voice begins to cause a stir. Turns out a survivor named Arzt knows something about weather patterns is telling everyone that they’re on the cusp of monsoon season which means the trade winds will take the raft south instead of north.  Michael asks when they are supposed to launch and Arzt tells them yesterday.

Kate talks to Michael about the raft and she makes it known she wants on the raft, telling him she’s had experience on sailboats and would be valuable compared to someone like Sawyer.  He doesn’t budge though.

There’s not really a Plot B storyline this episode but we do get several little threads that tie into Kate’s goal of getting on the raft.  Sun tries talking to Jin about his leaving and he gives her the cold shoulder, upsetting her. Sayid takes Jack to meet Locke out at the hatch.  Jack and Locke start to squabble over sharing information and this seems to be a duel we will see more and more. Jack wants to open the hatch and Sayid is not in favor of that option, believing the hatch is not safe and should be buried.

Sawyer nonchalantly asks Michael why Jin is bringing fish since they’ll be out on the open water.  This bugs Michael enough to question Sawyer’s ability to survive out at sea. He voices his doubt of bringing Sawyer.  Off screen, we can surmise Michael mentioned Kate taking his spot because he finds Kate, interrupting her while she’s messing with a passport not belonging to her.  They argue and Kate tells him if she wanted his spot on the raft, she would get it (trouble is a brewing in paradise).


Flashback:  Kate arrives at a hospital with flowers and asks for the room of one Diane Janson who happens to be her mom.  She notices a officer on guard at her mom’s door and walks right past it, eventually ending up in the backseat of a doctor whose name is Tom and who happens to know Kate.  Turns out they were childhood friends (maybe BFFs). She asks for Tom’s help to see her mom and he obliges but before they go to the hospital, they stop off at a large tree in the middle of the night to dig up a time capsule where we learn the toy plane belonged to Tom (uh oh…) and a tape recording from back in 1989 when they were preteens.  They exchange a kiss despite Tom being married with kids (Kate apologized) and then head off for the hospital.

Michael and Jin are working on the raft when Michael suddenly starts feeling ill.  Walt runs off to find Jack but finds Kate and Sun instead. Sun goes with Walt and Kate runs off to find Jack who is heading back from the hatch with Sayid and Locke.  Jack checks Michael out and has a hunch something in Michael’s limited island diet made him sick. He searches through the empty water bottles Michael and Jin have gone through and Jack finds one with what looks like residue at the bottom.  Jack tells Michael suspects Sawyer.

When Jack tells Locke about Sawyer possibly being behind the sabotage, Hurley wonders out loud if it was because of Kate vying for Sawyer’s spot on the raft.  He also lets slip about Kate being a fugitive, which Locke didn’t know (oops). Once again, the not sharing info causes friction between Jack and Locke. Suffice to say, Jack and Kate get into it at the caves because Jack questions whether she poisoned Michael and she’s not all that thrilled about the implication.


There’s a small moment that I think is very important when Walt approaches Locke and makes sure Locke knows he wasn’t behind making his dad sick.  Locke assures him he doesn’t suspect him and when he reaches how to touch Walt’s arm, Walt tells Locke very suddenly not to open that “thing” which Locke is confused about we know he means the hatch.  We know there’s something different about Walt but we don’t know what. Something transpired between the two and Walt got some kind of premonition about the hatch (spine-tingling!).

Sawyer tosses Michael some pepto to calm his stomach and Michael blames Sawyer for making him sick.  They argue and Sawyer goes for Kate, grabbing her bag and emptying it to grab a passport. The passport is in fact the one she was doctoring from earlier and happens to belong to the woman, Joanna who died back at the beginning of the season.  Sawyer calls her out for being the fugitive and she confesses to everyone in hearing distance she was being escorted by the marshall. Michael rescinds his plan to remove Sawyer for Kate and she’s left alone, now looked at differently by everyone.


Flashback:  Tom makes good on his promise and gets Kate alone in a room with her mom who has cancer and is very sick.  Kate apologizes for what she’s put her mom through and gets no closure as her mom calls out for help. Kate runs and is followed by Tom.  She takes his car with him in it, refusing to leave her side. While trying to drive off and escape a policeman shoots at the windshield, leaving Kate to crash.  Unfortunately, Tom has been shot in the chest and if the previous Kate-centric episode is any indication, Tom has died (remember, she told Jack the toy plane belonged to the man she loved–the man she killed).

Jack approaches Sun and reveals he knows she tried to get Jin sick so he would stay behind and not leave her.  Sun is pleased to know Jack won’t tell anyone and later tells Kate Jack knows it was her but did not know it was Kate who gave Sun the idea (aha!  Conniving little Kate).

The episode ends with Walt confessing to Michael that he burned the first raft because he didn’t want to leave the island.  Michael understands and tells Walt they don’t have to go and stay but Walt tells him they have to leave (what did he see?!).

Yet again, another strong episode.  So, a little change to the schedule.  Because of the holiday, I’ll be doing the two-part finale on 27th instead of the 24th.  I need some extra time to do the blog post and I don’t know quite how to structure it because there’s a lot that happens.  One more post and we’ve made it!

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: The Greater Good

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Sayid tries to talk to Shannon while she’s sitting at Boone’s side but gets nothing out of her as she mourns.


Flashback:  Sayid is being escorted by two security guards in Heathrow Airport to a room where he’s talked to by the CIA and SIS.  They want him to work for them, to find C4 explosives stolen in Sydney by someone he knows: his college roommate, Essam.  They use the whereabouts of Nadia to persuade him. He agrees and makes contact with Essam, earning the trust of his former friend and his terror cell companions.

Jack is off looking for Locke but going in circles, slow and tired.  Kate finds him and stops his search. They return to the beach and prepare to bury Boone.  Jack asks Shannon if she has anything to say but she declines. Sayid speaks of Boone’s courage in a honoring speech.  Locke interrupts and says it was his fault, that they found a plane and Boone climbed up to it to try the radio. Jack starts screaming at Locke, asking where he went and attacks.  The exertion wanes on Jack and he’s pulled off Locke by the others.

Walking away, Jack tells Sayid that Locke lied about Boone, who said something about a hatch and Locke not wanting anyone to know about it.

The Plot B story follows Charlie as he takes care of Claire’s baby so she can sleep.  Charlie does his best to keep the baby from crying but fails until he finds Sawyer’s voice soothes the baby.  It adds levity and some humor at times but doesn’t really add much to the story.

Locke goes to Shannon to apologize to her about Boone but Shannon goes to Sayid and tells him she believes Locke killed Boone and wants to know what Sayid is going to do about it.  Jack’s incapacitated after Kate crushes sleeping pills into his drink so he’s out for the episode allowing Sayid to take point. While Locke washes Boone’s blood from his shirt, Sayid approaches and asks about Locke’s kidney transplant scar to which Locke says it was a war wound.  Sayid tells Locke he wants to investigate the plane and see if the radio is salvageable. Locke agrees and off they go.

Sayid asks plenty of questions about the plane and how Locke and Boone found it.  Locke answers freely, saying “luck” helped them find it. Locke mentions Sayid has not lost his interrogator touch and he didn’t appreciate Jack calling him a liar in front of the whole group.  Sayid assures him he knows when he’s been lied to. They come to the plane and Sayid looks on in surprise.


Flashback:  Sayid tries talking Essam out of the attack in Sydney and learns Essam does not want to kill the innocent.  Sayid takes the info to the CIA and SIS contacts and thinks he can talk Essam out of committing the terror act but they want the explosives, not caring about Essam.  They want him to encourage Essam to carry it out so he can lead them to the explosives. Sayid feels forced to comply and convinces Essam to do it but he’s included to be a martyr alongside his friend.


Locke asks why Sayid continues to distrust him and Sayid mentions the pistol Locke has told no one about that he’s been concealing (that Sayid’s a smart one he is).  Locke hands it over while mentioning the drug smuggler dressed as a priest. Still not having Sayid’s trust, Locke admits to being the one who knocked Sayid out when he was trying to triangulate Rousseau’s signal (didn’t see that coming!).  Sayid puts the gun to Locke’s throat in anger, asking if it was Locke who burned the raft. Locke denies doing so. Sayid asks about the hatch next and Locke plays it off, saying there are two hatches on the plane.

Sayid checks on Shannon telling her he thinks Boone’s death was an accident but Shannon is not satisfied, leaving him.  Jack wakes up from his drugging and quickly realizes the key to the gun case is gone. He freaks out thinking Locke took it but Sayid believes it was actually Shannon and they rush off to find her.

Flashback:  Sayid and Essam are taken to where the moving truck holding the explosives awaits their use.  Before they drive off, Sayid confesses he’s working with the authorities. Essam is angry and pulls the gun on Sayid but takes his own life.  In the aftermath, Sayid gets the whereabouts of Nadia (she’s in Irvine, CA explaining Sayid’s being on Oceanic 815).


Jack and Kate are slowed down but Sayid finds Shannon pointing a gun at Locke.  Sayid does his best to convince Shannon to not go through with shooting Locke. When Kate and Jack arrive, Sayid jumps into action.  Shannon gets a shot off but it only nicks Locke in the head.

That night, Kate tells Sayid Shannon needs time but he disagrees.  He goes to Locke and tells Locke to take him to the hatch and when Locke acts like he doesn’t know what hatch, Sayid tells him he knows when he’s being lied to and Locke’s lying.

Another solid episode in my opinion.  The next episode is a Kate-centric one and after that we’re onto the finale!  

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Do No Harm

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Caveville is in fast action mode as Jack begins to work on Boone.  Sun and Kate are there at Jack’s side helping in any way they can. Kate is dispatched to go to Sawyer and get whatever medical and alcohol supplies he has in his stash.  Boone’s lung collapses and Jack punches a hole in his chest so breathing can continue (yeah, that was hard to watch). Not only that, but Boone’s leg is fractured and he’s lost a lot of blood.  Suffice to say this episode starts with frenzy and doesn’t really slow down much.

I’ll do my best to give the summary of the episode which is fast moving with the situation with Boone and Claire who is a our Plot B thread.  I’ll get to that soon.


Flashback:  Jack is at what can best be described as an island resort for his upcoming wedding.  This is the first mention (as far as I can remember) of Jack being married. We meet his fiance, Sarah, as she gives a speech about how two years prior, she was in a bad car accident and her back was broken, told she would not walk again.  Jack was her doctor and made it so she could dance at her wedding. She calls Jack the most committed man she’s ever met and later we discover Jack is struggling to write his vows.

Kate finds Sawyer near the raft and tells him what happened.  She gets all that he has in supplies Jack needs and heads back to the caves.  On the way, though, she trips and some of the alcohol bottles break. She hears someone nearby and finds Claire who is having contractions (what timing?!).  Screaming for help, Jin hears Kate and runs into action. Kate does her best to communicate to him about Claire and sends him and the supplies to the caves.

Jack’s sewing Boone’s wounds up and tells Sun Boone needs a transfusion but first he needs to set the leg.  He does and it’s gruesome leaving a passed out Boone suddenly awake and screaming in pain. Jack’s obviously stressed and getting pushed to his limits knowing he has little to work with.  Once he’s “calmed” a bit, Sun asks Boone what his blood type is and even though they learn he’s A Negative, Jack makes the point that even if they could find a match for Boone’s blood type, he had bamboo to work with as a needle.  No bueno. Still, he has Sun find Charlie and have him ask everyone what their blood type is and also to find Shannon who happens to be out on a private excursion with Sayid unaware of what happened to her stepbrother.


Charlie returns with meager results.  Only four people out of their forty plus group knows their blood type and none of them match Boone’s.  Sun shows up without Shannon but does have something of good news: a sea urchin. Turns out if you’re ever in need of a transfusion on a desert island, sea urchin spines can act as a crude needle.  Jack asks Charlie if anyone was O Negative and educates us all that O Negative is a universal donor and there does happen to be one person with that blood type: Jack-o.

Jin arrives to the caves and tells Jack (who is giving Boone blood) through Sun’s translating about Claire and Kate.  Jack gives Jin the instructions needed for Kate to deliver Claire’s baby because he won’t be there. He needs to stay there with Boone.  When Boone comes to, he tells Jack about the plane and that being the cause for his injuries, also mentioning the hatch and Locke not wanting to tell anyone about it.  Before Jack can get any clarity though, Boone passes out again and Jack is not looking good.


Flashback:  Jack is sitting at the resort pool working on his vows with a bottle of vodka to give him inspiration.  Christian shows up and it’s clear that this is well before their falling out. They chat about Jack’s vows and what not.  Ultimately though the emotions get amped up when during the actual ceremony, Jack tells Sarah that she had it wrong: he didn’t fix her, instead she fixed him (I’m a sucker for this speech every time; it’s delivered with great emotion and just tugs the right heart strings for me).

It’s night time when we return to Claire and Kate and Claire thinks the contractions have stopped but Kate’s not convinced.  Claire’s water breaks before Charlie and Jin arrive and Kate gets the news that Jack’s not coming and it’s on her to deliver the baby.  She doubts herself but Charlie makes it clear it’s on her. Claire does her best to prevent progress by holding her breath and eventually confesses the baby won’t want her because she didn’t want it.  Kate assures her that they are supportive and the baby will want Claire. Much pushing takes place and Claire eventually birth. It’s a boy!!!

Giving hours of blood, Jack can see the transfusion isn’t working as blood is pooling to Boone’s fractured leg.  Jack is convinced something crushed his leg, which goes against what Locke said happened. Sun pulls the plug on Jack’s giving blood, telling him he’s given enough and needs to rest.  Jack doesn’t fight her and asks Hurley to get Michael.

With Michael’s help, he and Jack are preparing to use a cargo container with a rising door to amputate Boone’s bum leg.  Sun opposes the decision but Jack believes it’s the best option to give Boone a chance at living. Boone coughs up blood and Sun uses that to prove Boone is bleeding internally and amputating his leg won’t help.  Before Jack can carry through with his decision, Boone wakes up and stops him, telling Jack he doesn’t have to keep his promise of saving him. Jack’s remorse is evident and you can’t help but feel for him. Before Boone can ask Jack to tell Shannon something, he passes.


Back on the beach, there is joy at seeing Claire’s baby but things shift as Shannon and Sayid return not aware of anything that’s happened.  Jack delivers the news of Boone’s death and Shannon has the appropriate reaction. When Kate tries to talk to Jack about everything that went down, Jack says Boone was murdered and he’s going to go find Locke, believing he’s the culprit (uh oh).

Another strong episode and one that is very emotional and still holds up.  Things are moving and will not stop as we get to the end of the first season.  We’ve got two more episodes before we hit the two-part season finale.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Deus Ex Machina

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Flashback:  The episode starts with a “younger” Locke (he has hair!) working in a toy store, setting up the board game “Mouse Trap”.  He explains the game to a boy who asks about it (this theme of Locke being someone who likes games and puzzles is very apparent at this point).  He notices a woman wearing a fur coat loitering nearby and he goes to ask if he can help her. She asks about footballs and he directs her to the right aisle.

Locke and Boone are at the excavated hatch (really, it looks like a concrete bunker that might be more reminiscent of a bomb shelter).  Locke has assembled what he calls a trebuchet to break through the small glass window in the hatch door. Boone makes a comment about them working on opening the hatch door for two weeks and the fact that Locke never talks about himself to which Locke explains his life story is boring.  They get ready to try their trebuchet and initiate its action. Failure. The trebuchet breaks upon impact which takes a toll on Locke as he seems completely baffled at his plan failing. Boone mentions Locke’s leg and he looks down to find a piece of metal sticking out of his flesh (bummer…).

Locke patches up his leg wound and begins to poke and prod at his legs where it’s apparent he seems to have lost feeling but not functionality.  As a final test, he takes a burning end of a stick from his campfire and presses the embers to the bottom of his foot: nothing. That’s not good.  He tells Boone that morning that the trebuchet didn’t work because it wasn’t strong enough. Boone challenges him on their next step and Locke says they will get an answer from the island.  It will tell them what to do. Boone is perplexed by this line of thinking (maybe thinking Locke’s gone crazy?).

Flashback:  Leaving for the day from his job, Locke sees the woman in the fur coat loitering in the parking lot and tries to confront her again.  Once he catches up to her, she confesses she’s his mother (unexpected). They go to coffee and Locke asks some questions eventually asking about his father to which she says he doesn’t have one and that he was immaculately conceived (yeah, okay).  Shortly after that, Locke gets results from a private investigator who confirms the woman is his mother, states she’s been institutionalized for a form of schizophrenia, and also has info on his actual father who may or may not have known of Locke’s birth.

The Plot B thread of this episode focuses on Sawyer and a bad case of the headaches.  He’s trying to get help from Sun who tells him to use a particular plant (island organic all-natural) but it doesn’t seem to be working.  Kate is concerned and goes to Jack to see if he can help Sawyer but unless Sawyer comes to Jack-o himself, Jack’s not interested in helping.  Kate is done with Sawyer’s outbursts at people about being too loud and takes him to Jack who does a brilliant job of “diagnosing” Sawyer by asking some very private questions with Kate present mind you.  Sawyer storms off once things get a little heated and Jack smugly tells Kate Sawyer needs glasses because he’s been spending a lot of his time reading, straining his eyes. Sayid puts his ingenuity at work and fashions a pair of glasses for Sawyer which helps.  Definitely a lighter tone as this episode with Locke gets emotional.


Boone arrives on site and Locke tells him he’s late for “work” to which Boone remains unconvinced they are making any real progress on the hatch.  Locke continues his schtick about the island giving them a sign and looks up to see a small seaplane flying overhead looking as if it’s going to crash nearby.  When Locke asks Boone if he saw the plane, he is speechless at the sight of a bloody-faced Boone saying in a creepy voice, “Theresa falls up the stairs; Theresa falls down the stairs” over and over again.  Next, he sees his mother in her fur coat pointing up at the sky before finding himself back in his wheelchair unable to use his legs. He begs, “Don’t take it back!” before waking up from the obvious nightmare.  Yeah, that was weird and creepy but knowing Locke, that’s his sign from the island. He wakes up Boone and they get an early start on the day.


Flashback:  Locke drives to a gated house fit with a gate guard and asks for Anthony Cooper who happens to be his biological father.  He gets some pushback from the guard until he calls the house and grants Locke access. Inside the house, Locke notices photos that show a man who has been around the world.  Cooper comes out and the two share pleasantries. Locke is definitely not sure what to make of meeting the man but when he’s asked to go hunting, he agrees to go.

Locke tells Boone about his very real dream and as Boone pushes back, Locke asks who Theresa is.  This shakes Boone and he agrees to continue on with Locke. Later, he mentions possibly saying Theresa’s name in their time together but doesn’t expound.  Locke’s legs give out at one point and as Boone helps him up, Locke reaches out to take a rosary out of a tree. The owner of said rosary falls out of the tree: a dead priest.  Locke finds a wad of Nigerian naira in the priest’s pocket and a pistol making it quite clear the man was unlikely a priest.


Locke loses all feeling in his legs and collapses soon after they find the dead priest.  Boone says they need to stop their trek and gets pushback from Locke and as he tries to help Locke tells Boone about his being in a wheelchair for four years and getting healed by the island, not understanding why the island was taking the healing back.  Boone tells the story of who Theresa is, saying she was a nanny of his who took a bad step and died while falling down the stairs when he was six years old. Locke starts to laugh, angering Boone but when Locke points past him at the seaplane he saw in his dream.  Boone agrees to climb up to the plane and search inside it.

Flashback:  Locke returns to Cooper’s house for another hunting trip.  Inside, he finds Cooper hooked up to a dialysis machine for his kidneys which he needs a transplant for.  He and Locke go dove hunting and Locke gets an attaboy when he gets a kill. Cooper tells Locke that at least his crazy mother brought them together, allowing time spent with each other with what little Cooper has left.  The next thing we know is both are in a hospital with Locke donating one of his kidneys to his father.


Boone climbs up to the plane while Locke watches on; he succeeds despite the plane not being very stable on its cliff perch.  Inside, he finds a second dead not-priest and the mother load: heroine-filled Virgin Mary statues. Yep, Locke thinks the answer to his problems are actually dead drug smugglers and heroine-filled statues.  Boone throws a statue out to which Locke is confused, unsure what to make of the revelation. Boone tries the radio in the plane and actually makes contact with someone. He says they’re survivors of Oceanic Flight 815 (is it just me or have I put “Flight 180” in some of these posts?  I’m sure one of my many readers can confirm this) but before any more information can be exchanged, the plane shifts and nose dives into the ground. Locke gets use of his legs again (not sure how) and pulls Boone out of the wreckage and he’s in bad shape.

Flashback:  Locke wakes up in his hospital room alone and asks the nurse tending to him where Cooper is.  She says he checked out of the hospital earlier and returned home under private care. Locke is in disbelief and his mother shows up saying it was Cooper’s idea and that Locke would not have offered his kidney unless it was his idea to do so.  Still in disbelief and denial, Locke leaves the hospital, goes to Cooper’s house, and is denied entry. Heartbroken and reduced to the lowest of emotions, we feel Locke’s pain as we realize as he does that his father conned him, only wanting a kidney and nothing more.


Locke brings Boone into the caves, saying Boone fell off a cliff while they were hunting, and while Jack gets to work, he asks Locke what happened exactly but Locke slips out avoiding answering.  In obvious anger and confusion, the episode ends with Locke at the hatch banging against the door screaming at the island for reasons why things had happened as they did. Suddenly, a light from inside turns on and Locke’s left shocked and speechless.

Woo!  What an episode!  Seriously another one of my favorites (I may say this about the next few episodes to be honest).  This show really picks up from this point forward and we get some truly amazing storytelling and character moments.  Locke remains an amazing character and this episode solidifies why Terry O’Quinn was nominated and won an Emmy for this season.  I SOOOOOO wish I could go into spoilers now but I will resist.

Answers are coming in the next episode (though not some of the ones you might hope for).

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Numbers

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We get our first Hurley-centric episode (sans the eye opening motif this time around).  He’s helping with the raft where we see Michael and Jin working well together and seeming to understand each other (very Han and Chewy actually).  Jack shows up and Michael makes a pitch to get some kind of method to put out a distress call. Jack doesn’t know if Sayid can conjure up a device let alone power it.  Hurley makes mention of Rousseau having batteries.

Jack and Hurley approach Sayid but he’s resistant to going to Rousseau and asking for a battery.  Sayid makes his point harder that he doesn’t even know where to find her if he did want to help them.  He pushes the maps and papers he took from her at them and Hurley stares at a piece of paper that has a set of six numbers repeated again and again: 4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42.


Flashback:  Hurley is watching tv, channel surfing while eating from a bucket of chicken and wearing the uniform of said chicken establishment.  He’s getting the guilt trip from his mom before he lands on a channel going over the lotto numbers. Hurley stands after the last number is read and looks at his matching lotto ticket.  Yep, those numbers are the same written by Rousseau. Being a winner, he faints.

Sayid is asleep in his tent and finds Hurley there asking about Rousseau.  He’s hunting for answers and mentions the numbers. Sayid thinks they’re coordinates of some kind and Hurley deems it time to investigate further.  He gathers water before heading off and lies to Charlie about what he’s doing. Sayid confronts Jack blaming him for sending Hurley to do his dirty work and quickly realizes Jack doesn’t know what he’s talking about.  They ask Charlie about Hurley and realize he’s on his way to find Rousseau.


Plot B for this episode mostly follows Locke asking Claire to help him with a project, which turns out to be his building a cradle for her.  We also see an agitated Sawyer reading A Wrinkle in Time, which will come into play in a later episode.  Sun tells Kate Jin will never speak to her again because she humiliated him.  She wonders if he will go with Michael on the raft, leaving her behind.

Hurley is walking along the beach until he finds the wire leading out to the ocean from the jungle.  He follows it into the jungle where he comes across a dead boar caught in a Rousseau trap and steps on a pressure trigger for another.  Sayid is there just in time to tell Hurley not to move. Hurley doesn’t listen though and jumps clear of a released spiky killing bundle that narrowly misses him.  Jack and the group question his decisions and Hurley lies saying he wants to get a battery for raft. Reluctantly, Sayid takes point and they follow the wire deeper into the jungle.

Flashback:  Hurley’s getting interviewed by local media in LA about his lotto winnings.  He talks about how he plans to spend the money to help his family. His Grandpa Tito is present and ends up having a heart attack on live tv.  Hurley begins to question his lotto winnings as more bad things happen to those around him. His mom hurts her ankle while he arrives at the house he bought for her.  Smoke rises from a bedroom of the house and cops show up to arrest Hurley mistaking him for a drug dealer. A short time later, he finds that he won a settlement against the LAPD, over-insured a sneaker factory in Canada that burnt down, and is the major shareholder of a box company in Tustin (yes, the same box company our dear friend, John Locke, worked at).  Hurley deduces that it’s not the money that’s cursed but the numbers he played.


The wire eventually leads straight into the floor of the jungle with no noticeable sign or reason for its purpose.  Nearby, Charlie finds an old rickety bridge that leads across a ravine. Not wanting to waste any time searching for another way across, Hurley crosses and surprises the group by making it across without a hitch.  Charlie follows but as he reaches the other side, the bridge breaks leaving Jack and Sayid to find another way across. Hurley and Charlie head on to look for Rousseau but find they’re being shot at and separate as they run for safety.

Flashback:  Hurley is asking for a man named Lenny in what appears to be a mental institute and is recognized by a doctor, implying that Hurley was once a patient (interesting…).  He finds Lenny who is repeating the numbers over and over again. Hurley tells Lenny about his playing the numbers in the lotto and Lenny breaks out of his rote mumblings.  He’s very upset that Hurley played the numbers and begins to scream that Hurley needs to get far away from the numbers. Before being dragged out of the room, Lenny tells Hurley about a man named Sam Toomey and where he can be found, which happens to be in Australia.  Once Hurley arrives in a shack in the middle of the Outback, he meets Sam’s wife and learns that Sam and Lenny served in the US Navy together and 16 years ago were in the South Pacific manning a long-wave radio station and the numbers being repeated again and again suddenly broke through the static.  Sam used the numbers much like Hurley did and his fortune became the misfortune of others. He made the numbers go away but only by committing suicide, which leaves Hurley nowhere closer to finding an answer to the numbers.


Jack and Sayid eventually find their way to an area Sayid recognizes and Jack trips a wire that causes an explosion.  This so happens to be Rousseau’s rigging of her underground lair where she kept Sayid being destroyed because she knew Sayid would come back in search of her.  Nothing can be salvaged from the explosion. Hurley finds a gun in his face after he trips and falls. He finds himself facing Rousseau and convinces her he is friends with Sayid.  He asks about the numbers and tells her he thinks they’re cursed. She explains that her crew came across a transmission of the numbers being repeated. They changed course, crashed on the island, and eventually located the radio tower.  Members of her crew began to grow sick and once they all died, she changed the transmission to the one Sayid picked up. She eventually agrees with hurley believing the numbers are in fact cursed. This is a huge relief to Hurley, finding closure in her agreeing with him.


Charlie runs in to Jack and Sayid and they set out to find Hurley but he shows up unharmed and unconcerned.  He hands over a battery from Rousseau and they head back to camp. Michael gets his battery to power his distress call once they set out to sea.  Charlie asks Hurley for the truth of his antics that day and when Hurley tells him he’s worth $156 million, Charlie storms off not believing the big man.


The episode ends with the camera panning in on the excavated hatch that Locke and Boone have been keeping secret and stops on six numbers pressed into the side of the concrete.  Yep, 4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42.

One of my favorite episodes in Season 1.  Hands down! The numbers are so key to the show.  Go back through the episodes and see if you can count how many times any of these numbers were mentioned or seen.  Trust me, they are there. Solid episode that makes the island more mysterious than it already is.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: …In Translation

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The open-eye motif continues with Jin while he’s on the beach but we move straight into the first Flashback.  So hear we go!


Flashback:  Jin is in a ritzy room, standing in front of Sun’s father all demure and silent until he asked why he wants to marry Sun.  Giving all the right answers to Sun’s father who is definitely putting out some scary/mafia-like vibes, it all ends with Jin getting the blessing to marry Jin but the cost requires him to work for her father.  The flashbacks are intersected throughout the episode showing us Jin’s starts as a loving, gentle husband but things turn and do so quickly (I’ll get to that).

Back on the beach, Jin sees Sun down a ways strut out in a bikini.  Well wouldn’t you know it, he’s not happy to see her “flaunting” (he thinks she’s doing this but that’s not her intention if you’ve been paying attention seeing her wear layers on a beach).  Everyone of the group is watching when Jin tries to cover his wife up and they’re all a bit nonchalant about the encounter, finding it somewhat typical. Well, our “Mystery Island Father of the Year” nominee (would he really be the winner?), Michael, is not impressed with just watching and intervenes.  Before things before him and Jin can come to fiery fisticuffs, Sun slaps Michael leaving him shocked.


In the caves, Jin asks Sun point blank if there’s anything between her and Michael.  She blows it off as nonsense but Jin’s not an idiot and can tell there’s something there (not romantic of course but Michael knows her secret of knowing English).  Jin storms off and Sun goes to find Michael to apologize for her slap. Michael thinks he simply put his nose in business not his own but Sun warns him that he doesn’t know what Jin is capable of and she was protecting him (interesting…).

Plot B of the episode centers around the raft Michael’s been building and it’s pretty impressive considering what he has at his disposal for supplies.  Michael’s excited to show Walt the buildings of New York City but Walt’s less than thrilled. Jack shows up to talk to Michael about the space on the raft.  Turns out there’s room for four and only one spot left. Guess who has that third spot? Yep! Sawyer. Looting supplies paid off for him. There’s also a moment between Sayid and Shannon hinting (more like nudging) that things are getting more serious between them.  Sayid wants to offer some courtesy to Boone about this but Boone’s not all that caring or surprised, seeming to expect Shannon to attach herself to a guy. She’s not happy when Sayid tries to break things off between them, tells Locke to tell Boone to stay out of her life, and goes back to Sayid saying they all get a new start on the island (Locke’s message to everyone).


That night Kate and Sun are talking and Kate asks how much longer Sun will let Jin treat her the way he does.  Sun defends Jin, saying he was not always the harsh type, reiterating what she said to Michael. Things take a turn when raised voices alert them to something happening.  Charlie announces the raft is on fire and despite their best efforts, the flames engulf the craft. Michael is irate (as expected) and asks Sun where Jin is, accusing him of the crime.  Others agree with Michael while Jack tries to defend Jin. Sun runs off and funds Jin in the caves trying to treat burns on his hands and forearms (yeesh, looks like he might have done it).


Flashback:  Jin gets a promotion and is told to go deliver a message of displeasure to the Secretary of Environmental Safety from his father-in-law.  He does so and while Mr. Secretary thinks he’s going to get some physical message, Jin does not deliver that. As a thank you, Mr. Secretary gives Jin the puppy we saw him give Sun in their previous episode.  Connection time! We see the secretary’s daughter watching tv and who is on screen: Hurley!!! That’s interesting. Why would Hurley be on tv? The answer to that is coming on the next episode. Failing to deliver the message expected by his father-in-law, Jin gets a tongue lashing and before another thug employee can do use a gun, Jin intervenes and uses his fists, making sure nothing worse happens to Mr. Secretary.

Jin is out hiding and finds a stream to cool his burn wounds but Sawyer surprises him, knocks him out, and takes him prisoner back to the beach.  Once at the beach, Michael confronts Jin and Jack is called down by Sayid and others to let them settle their differences. Jin gets quite the beating from Michael (he doesn’t fight back at all, which is interesting) before Sun screams in English for Michael to stop.  Everyone’s shocked and Jin most of all. Sun tries to defend him saying Jin was trying to put out the fire but Sawyer doesn’t believe her. Locke interrupts to remind everyone that they’re not the only people on the island, being kidnapped, killed, and sabotaged. This defuses the quarrel as people take his words to heart.


Flashback:  Jin arrives at a fishing village and greets his father, whom he has led everyone in his life to be dead.  Jin apologizes and looks for reconciliation with his father which he gets. He explains his new life and his father encourages him to take Sun to America and disappear.  This all gives new light to what we saw in the airport when he showed her the flower and made her stay with him rather than fake a kidnapping and death.

The episode ends with Michael deciding to build a new raft despite not having the supplies he needs anymore.  Locke offers to play a game of backgammon with Walt and asks why Walt burned the raft (what?!) Walt explains he wants to stay on the island.  Locke understands and promises not to reveal what he did. Sun and Jin are obviously on the outs. He doesn’t want to speak to her, feeling betrayed, while she tries to explain herself (without ever doing so).  The next morning Michael is working and Jin shows up with bamboo, saying “boat” to make it clear he means to get off the island.

I actually like this episode more than I thought I would.  There are things I’ve missed about Jin and I actually think he’s just as complex a character as someone like Sawyer or Jack.

Flash Fiction: Among Weeping Headstones


Early morning dew pearled on the cold slate surfaces of the headstones.  Damrin wondered who lay underneath the grassy plots.  There were minor signs of evidence of a homestead once standing on the off-beaten path of the main highway.

The legendary Wielder, Barat Bladeveil, pressed his head to the middle headstone but if he prayed or said anything, it was too low for Damrin to hear.  Their arrival to the odd location had been unexpected and Damrin wondered if Barat was collected in his thoughts or if his old age and long years touching his Shoal had poisoned his mind in any way.

Throughout their short time together, Damrin watched his companion for any alarming sign of Shoal stress.  It never revealed itself in the same way in a Wielder but if one knew what to look for based on previous cases, it could be discerned.  Damrin believed it too important to ignore.

“Are you concerned?” Barat asked suddenly.

Damrin fumbled over a response, not expecting the question but then not knowing what subject Barat alluded to.  “The current state of the world demands it, I should think,” he settled upon.

Barat turned to face him; a slight rise in his upper lip gave an offsetting smile.  “You tread lightly around me…as you should.”

A hard swallow delayed Damrin from responding but he found his voice past the awkward moment.  “This collection of Breshtk noblemen and women traveling to convene and discuss the state of their Hold is worth my concern.”

“And the Shoal spill?  Does that not demand our concern?”

“Of course, but we’ve not found any of the…aberrations despite our long days and searching.”

“What of me?”  Barat stepped away from the graves, facing Damrin with searching eyes.

“Concern for you?  Should there be any?”  Damrin felt sweat begin to form on his face, unsure of what Barat Bladeveil could or would do if he truly was mad.

The legendary Wielder hawked and twisted around to spit onto the middle grave plot.  “Time is my enemy and the Shoals have both limited and expanded my life.  I’ve been praised and cursed for the same feats.  Concern?  The only concern you should have, Damrin Graeves, is that this world is thrown into chaos by the Shoals and there is little doubt in my mind the Hallowed plays a game with our lives.”

An argument rose up in Damrin’s mind but he kept it behind his clenched teeth.  The words just spoken to him were as near blasphemous as ever there could be among Wielders.  The Hallowed was divine and as such deserved their faith and submission.

Barat looked off toward the highway where the distant forms of travelers could be made out.  “Such a collection of people might attract the Shoal creatures.  We should be mindful of that.  Concern yourself with what must be done should they be attacked.  As I told you when I first collected you, the squabbles of the Holds do not matter.  Fixing the damage done by an open Shoal is all that matters here and now.  Prepare yourself.”

Damrin meant to do just that but he had no idea what that might entail.  He watched Barat Bladeveil closely as he walked away, seeming to head towards the highway.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Outlaws

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The episode kicks off with a young Sawyer (remember, his real name is James) waking up from his father banging against the front door, screaming to be let in the house.  Sawyer’s mom comes in and urges him to hide under his bed, mentioning his father will think he’s at his grandparents’ house. While Sawyer hides, his mom goes to confront her angry husband.  A gunshot follows and Sawyer watches as his father enters his bedroom, sits on his bed, and shoots himself.

Sawyer wakes up in his tent and finds a boar rooting around.  His actions to get rid of the beastly intruder costs him his tent and much of his looted personal items were scattered.  Chasing the boar into the jungle, Sawyer comes to a stop and starts to hear whispers all around him before the very distinct phrase, “It’ll come back around,” is uttered and leaves us officially creeped out.

Kate and Jack are putting the guns back in the suitcase and Jack makes mention one remains and guess who has it?  Yes, our favorite Tennessee confidence man, Sawyer. Jack tells Kate not to worry about getting the gun back because he doesn’t want her to owe Sawyer anything.  Kate of course doesn’t listen.

Plot B for this episode is more to do with the aftermath of Charlie’s killing Ethan, which I actually applaud the show for not forgetting about addressing since it was just an episode ago.  Charlie’s distanced himself from folks especially Claire. He does get help from Hurley to bury Ethan and Hurley takes it upon himself to ask Sayid about PTSD, thinking Charlie may be suffering from it.  Sayid talks to Charlie and tells him he’s not alone and shouldn’t act as if he is.


Flashback:  Sawyer’s carrying on his favorite game of taking a woman who is likely married to a wealthy man into a hotel room for a little amorous time.  They’re interrupted by none other than the T-1000 (no, seriously, Robert Patrick makes an appearance!) whose name is Hibbs and has some history with Sawyer.  Trying to settle some unknown friction between them, Hibbs hands over a dossier with the whereabouts of one: John Connor (HA! I couldn’t resist!). No, actually, the dossier has info on a Frank Duckett who is in Sydney and ran his mouth on apparently getting a mark to kill his wife and himself back when Sawyer was a kid.  Yep, Duckett went by Frank Sawyer, making him the man behind our Sawyer’s misery.

Kate and Sayid have their fair share of fun teasing Sawyer about his misfortune with the boar.  He heads off into the jungle to find his tarp and when he does, he hears the whispers again along with the phrase, “It’ll come back around,” again.  He gets chased and knocked into some mud and feels things have gone the route of personal vendetta now. He loads his gun and sets out again to track his furry foe.  Kate eventually shows, saying she’ll help him track the boar but only in exchange for carte blanche, saying she wants the pick of his loot whenever she wants without any question.  Sawyer agrees and they set off together.


That night around their camp fire, they play the drinking game “I Never” and we learn some trivial things about them but we do find out Kate was married at one point and that both have killed a man.  In the morning, Sawyer finds all of his stuff has scattered and even peed on by the boar while Kate’s gear is untouched. Locke shows up saying he found their trail and came to say good morning. Kate gives him the update on Sawyer’s vendetta and Locke shares a story about his sister dying as a kid, his foster mother blaming herself, and a golden retriever that showed up out of nowhere and sleep on his sister’s bed staying with the family until his mother passed.  The moral of the story was to say sometimes animals can perhaps serve as vessels to bring closure to those suffering (if you believe in such things).


Flashback:  Sawyer’s in Sydney and tracks down a guy who will sell him a handgun.  Armed and ready for vengeance, Sawyer finds Frank Duckett at his shrimp food truck and finds himself unable to follow through with his desire to end the life of the man he’s had good reason to hate.


Finding himself in a bar he drinks with someone we recognize: Christian Shepherd! Yep, that’s right, Jack-o’s pop and Sawyer crossed paths. Christian confesses Jack’s a good man and he feels gratitude for what Jack did, which you’ll recall cost him his license.  Christian talks about fate and makes mention of the Red Sox never winning the World Series (this episode aired back before the team won back in 2004). Not knowing Sawyer’s business in Sydney, he convinces Sawyer to see through with his plans which Sawyer does and guns down Duckett back at his shrimp truck.  Sawyer reads his letter to the dying Duckett and realizes Duckett owed Hibbs money and is actually not the man behind the deaths of his parents. Sawyer got conned to kill a man who simply owed Hibbs a debt… Before he dies, Duckett says those creepy words we’ve heard in the jungle, “It’ll come back around”.


Sawyer and Kate find a piglet that likely belongs to the adult boar and while Sawyer uses it as bait for the momma boar, Kate takes off not appreciating his treatment of the animal.  The momma boar shows up but when given the chance to his exact his vengeance this time, he lowers the gun.

Back at the beach, Sawyer returns his gun to Jack who makes an offhand remark that the Red Sox will never win the World Series.  When Sawyer asks what the statement means, Jack pushes it aside saying it’s something his father would say in relation to fate. Making the connection that Sawyer’s drinking partner was indeed Jack’s father, Sawyer negates to share the information, leaving us shaking our fists at him.

Overall, a strong episode that I think is underrated.  We get more info on Sawyer who is a character I think is more complex than some of the others.  We also get what I think is one of our first instances where characters are connected before the crash on the island (this is more prominent as time goes by).

Next is a Sun and Jin centric episode but that won’t be posted until November 3rd as the next Shoals to the Hallowed flash fiction post will be on the 30th.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Homecoming

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We’ve got our next Charlie-centric episode as he wakes (sans the eye opening motif) in the caves at the sounds of Locke calling for Jack.  He’s got Claire in his arms saying she came walking through the jungle and collapsing when he and Boone were searching for Vincent. Charlie’s elated at her return but kept back as Jack does his doctor stuff.  When Claire wakes up, she screams asking who everyone is (not good). When Jack calms Claire, telling her the baby’s fine, he asks her what she remembers, she recalls being on a plane heading to LA. She gets the bad news of their crash and no rescue for several weeks and takes it somewhat well considering.

Boone asks Locke a poignant question of whether or not Claire escaped from Ethan and if so, is our “Other” enemy out there looking for her.  That seems to not have occurred to Locke and he’s definitely concerned at that possibility. Charlie does everything he can to comfort and console Claire in her state of forgetting and hands over her diary in hopes it will jog her memory.

The episode flows well and doesn’t have a Plot B story, focusing solely on Claire and the threat of Ethan.


Flashback:  (Note: For some reason, this episode’s flashbacks never seem to fit the narrative with Claire and Charlie but I’ll provide the gist.)  In what we can presume is a time after Driveshaft made it “big”, Charlie and his chum, Tommy, are getting high and then go to a pub where Tommy points a woman named Lucy whose father is of the upper echelon and “loaded”.  Charlie makes his way to Lucy’s table where her and her friends buy him drinks and he plays the rockstar card. He goes home with her and stakes out her father’s collection of war memorabilia and focuses in on a cigarette case owned by Winston Churchill.  He meets her dear old dad and confesses Driveshaft is unlikely to reunite and make a comeback. He falls for Lucy and accepts a job to sell copiers for her father but due to sobering up and going through withdrawals tosses his biscuits all over the the copy screen during his first sales pitch.  Turns out he nipped the cigarette case and it was found in his coat at the hospital where he was treated and returned to Lucy. He tries to defend himself and essentially gets kicked to the curb and told he’s worthless by a distraught Lucy.


Sayid questions how a very pregnant Claire got away from Ethan, reiterating to Jack, Locke, and Charlie that Ethan infiltrated their group and hung Charlie from a tree.  He questions the diagnosis of amnesia Claire is suffering and while Jack says it’s rare, there is obvious concern for the situation. Charlie’s miffed about how no one is talking to Claire and treating her with care and storms off to spend time with her.  Along the way, he walks with Jin who gets hit in the head by a stone thrown by a rough-looking Ethan. Charlie gets warned that if he doesn’t bring Claire to Ethan, someone will be killed each day and Charlie will be killed last.

Reporting this back to Jack and Locke, there’s a bit of disagreement in what to do.  Jack falls in line with Charlie’s thinking that they need to take the fight to Ethan but Locke feels they should play defense.  Inform everyone and set sentries. With Sayid, Locke sets up trip wires for alarms. Unfortunately, Ethan makes his way past the defenses, having come in by way of the ocean (freaking Aquaman apparently) and killing a character named Scott (kind of a redshirt though he has been on screen a few times).

Kate goes to Jack and makes a suggestion that Jack use the key kept around his neck to the marshal’s case and break out the guns.  Jack’s worried (rightfully so) that if there are guns out and about, they could shoot themselves. However, the death of Scott changes his mind when he talks to Locke about what might happen if more people start dying at Ethan’s hands.  Showing Locke the guns, a plan is put in order by Sayid to go as a group into the jungle with Claire as bait. Charlie’s not exactly a fan of the plan and wants in on it but when Locke asks him if he’s ever shot a gun before, Charlie’s silence says “no”.


The group comprises of Jack, Locke, Sayid, Sawyer, and Kate with Claire.  It’s raining good and hard when Ethan shows up and Jack moves in to take him down.  The goal is to take Ethan alive and Jack gives him quite the walloping (I think that’s Australian lingo) though he did lose his gun in the process.  On his knees, everyone surrounds Ethan while he’s on his knees. Gunshots ring out and Ethan’s riddled with bullets as Charlie unloads the clip of Jack’s gun (yep, that was unexpected).


Back at the caves, Charlie tells Jack he wasn’t going to let Ethan near Claire and he didn’t deserve to live after what he did.  Claire goes to Charlie later and tells him she remembers peanut butter which if you’ll recall they bonded over several episodes ago.  She still can’t remember what happened but she tells Charlie she trusts him, ending the episode on a sweeter moment.

So yeah, this episode.  Besides the Flashback just seeming disconnected from the island moments, I really like this one.  There’s this sense that our survivors are aligned against an outside enemy and not quibbling with each other.  There’s still a question of who Ethan was and whether or not he belongs to these Others that we keep hearing about.  And why the interest in Claire? Onto the next one, which is a Sawyer episode and a good one if I remember right.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Special

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Eye motif continues with Michael as he calls out Walt’s name in search for him.  Jack thinks it’s tough for Michael while Hurley thinks he hates it (he might be right…).  Walt is off with Locke and Boone practicing knife throwing. While Walt struggles, Locke tells him to imagine in his mind’s eye the target on the tree and Walt does so, nailing the spot on the tree with his next throw.  Michael finds them and he’s not happy about Walt being given a huge knife to throw about. He points the knife in Locke’s face in a threatening manner and gets attacked from behind by Boone. Michael gives Locke a final warning to stay away from Walt.


Flashback:  This episode follows the relationship between Michael and Walt’s mother, Susan.  They start things off happy but things turn when she gets a job opportunity to practice international law after Walt is probably 9 months old.  Michael tries his best to keep Walt from being moved away from him but Susan points out a court will not side with him since he’s out of work.


That night, Michael tells Sun he doesn’t want Walt to grow up on the island.  He finds Sayid telling Jack that Rousseau’s maps have to do with latitude and longitude, maybe having to do with the island or perhaps somewhere on the island.  Michael tells them they need to stop waiting for a rescue and take matters into their own hands. He means to build a raft but no one else seems enthused about it.

Walt is reading the Flash comic written in Spanish and focuses on the polar bear panel.  Michael asks him to help him and when Walt says he’s busy and likes the pictures of the comic, Michael (we learned he’s an artist earlier) tries to talk to Walt about drawing.  But Walt’s not interested and Michael takes the comic forcing Walt to help him gather supplies for the raft.

Flashback:  Michael calls Susan on a payphone and wants to talk to Walt who is only 21 months old.  We hear another man’s voice on her end of the phone and she tells Michael she’s seeing her boss, Brian.  Michael says he’s coming to Amsterdam where she is and see Walt, clearly upset things have ended between him and Susan.  Michael hangs and gets hit by a car in the street. Go a few months ahead and Susan shows up at the hospital to tell Michael she’s paying for his medical bills and wants him to give up his parental rights so Brian can adopt Walt.  Michael is mad and doesn’t want to give in but does.


Plot B follows Charlie as he searches for Claire’s bags. He finds them but doesn’t see her diary. He talks to Kate and they go to ask Sawyer if he has it. He does and Charlie punches him to get it. Sawyer hits back and Charlie tells him he hits like a ponse (LOL). Charlie tries not to read it but eventually does and goes to Sayid and Jack to share a passage. Apparently Claire had dreams about something called the Black Rock. Rousseau mentioned whatever this thing or place was to Sayid and they begin to think maybe Claire was taken there.

Michael and Walt are collecting supplies for the raft when Walt notices Locke and Boone coming out of the jungle and heading to the caves. Walt says he wants water and tries to talk to Locke. Not wanting to go against Michael, Locke tells Walt he’s not to come around anymore. Wouldn’t you know it, Michael shows up and threatens Locke once again. Locke tries to give Michael a peace offering but that doesn’t get over well.


Getting called a jerk by Walt, Michael tells him he will listen and throws the comic in the fire. Walt is told to stay there in the caves but he takes off with Vincent.

Flashback:  Walt is at his current age and with his mom and Brian in Australia doing homework on native birds. Susan doesn’t feel well and while Walt feels ignored, a bird crashes into the window killing itself. Brian looks at Walt like he had something to do with the bird. Brian shows up at Michael’s place in the US to tell him Susan died the day before from a blood disorder. He tells Michael Susan wanted him to take custody over Walt. Michael is conflicted realizing Brian lied and only adopted Walt because Susan wanted him to. He says there’s something off about Walt, that he’s different. Strange things happen when he’s around (that’s eerie).

Walt loses Vincent and is attacked by a polar bear but manages to get in a tree. Michael confronts Locke thinking Walt is there. Locke tells him he told Walt not to come around and they agree to go find Walt.

Flashback:  Michael goes to Australia to take Walt back with him and has to explain that since he’s his father, he gets custody (not really how it works but Michael didn’t want to tell him Brian didn’t want to be his dad anymore).  It’s an interesting moment but reveals why Michael was there in Sydney.


They find him and the polar bear (with some mighty bad CGI I might add) and save the day together. Locke and Michael seem to be on good terms and all is happy day. Michael and Walt clear the air and we learn Susan kept all of Michael’s letters in a box and never gave them to Walt (cold…real cold).

The episode finishes with Locke and Boone using the dog whistle to find Vincent. Who do they find instead? Claire!!!

Obviously this episode seems to be suggesting there’s something special about Walt but we don’t know quite what that means at this point.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Hearts and Minds

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The eye opening motif is back and this time it belongs to a brooding Boone as he watches Sayid and Shannon from a distance.  He gets interrupted by Hurley who’s asking about why he and Locke have not returned with any fresh boar kills. Boone essentially ignores Hurley and goes to confront Sayid, telling him to stay away from Shannon.  Sayid’s not impressed with Boone’s order and aggressive demeanor. Things look to be ready to go off between them when Locke calls out for Boone to come help him “track” a boar.


While they make their way through the jungle, Locke warns Boone not to make enemies of Sayid.  Locke says they’ll need him on their side once they’re ready to share what they found in the jungle.  We get a nice look at what appears to be a door set into the earth of the jungle. There’s hinges and small window set in the center and we’re all left thinking what Locke says, “how do open a door that has no discernible handle or way to open it?”  Boone mentions that they need to be truthful with the group about what they’re doing and not bringing back boar but Locke says they’re not ready yet.


Much of the Plot B threads have to do with Jack learning from Kate that Sun has built (form?  I don’t know) a garden. During her time with Sun, Kate eventually realizes Sun can understand her as she talks because mistakenly smiles in response.  Sun makes her promise to say nothing like she did with Michael. We also get some great comedic moments when Hurley tries to catch fish alongside Jin because he’s needs some protein due to the lack of boar.  Hurley steps on an urchin and tries to get Jin to pee on his foot (I can’t help but laugh).

Flashback:  (Note: I’ll sum up this flashback because it’s pretty “eh” in terms of revealing anything interesting except at the end where things get…ew.)  Boone’s at a country club and gets a phone call from Shannon. She screams at someone and tells Boone she’s in Sydney (now we know why they were on Flight 180) when he says he’s coming to get her.  When he arrives at the house of the guy she’s shacked up with, she acts surprised and tells Boone he should leave but makes sure to adjust her hair so he can see the bruise on her forehead.


Boone goes to the police, where we learn he and Shannon are actually step siblings, asking for help but gets none.  We do get to see an arrested Sawyer dragged by which makes you go, “hey!”. Left to his own devices, Boone goes to Shannon’s beau, Bryan, and offers to pay him 25k to leave Shannon, which Boone has done two times prior apparently.  Bryan makes Boone pay him 50k and when Boone goes to retrieve Shannon, we learn she tricked him and was in on the set up. Bryan makes some kind of mention that Shannon’s just getting what’s due to her from her father.

Later that night, Shannon shows up at Boone’s hotel room telling him Bryan took off with the money (not shocked).  Then things take a turn and…hmm, how should I convey this? We know they’re step parents but we don’t know when their parents married each other.  My guess would be when they were teenagers and just about at that age. Shannon tells Boone she’s always known about his feelings for her…and things go full Game of Thrones.  Yep, they sleep together. Like I said, “ew”.


Back to the present!  Boone sits patiently while Locke is working on something in a bowl.  When Boone asks what they’re doing just staring at the door in the floor, Locke tells him a story about the artist, Michelangelo, whose father didn’t want him to be an artist.  Older, a prince found Michelangelo staring at a marble slab and he did so for hours for days. When asked why, Michelangelo said he was working. Three years later that marble was made into the statue of David.  Locke uses the story to explain to Boone that they are going to figure out how to open the door by being patient. Boone wants to tell Shannon at least about the door and Locke sees there’s something unhealthy between them (ya think?).  Definitely some boundary issues. Boone pleads his case and Locke agrees but after that, he strikes Boone in the back of the head.

Boone wakes up to find himself tied down in such a way that I can’t explain.  One arm is behind his back and the other in front. Apparently, he can’t move the front without causing pain in the one behind his back (Locke’s a bad man).  Locke tells Boone he needs to let some things go and with whatever he has been mixing in that bowl of his, he places it on the wound in the back of Boone’s head.  Before taking off, Locke throws a knife into the ground in front Boone.


Sayid is working on a makeshift compass as he tries to make sense of Rousseau’s map.  Locke happens upon him and they make some small talk before Locke gives over his own compass to Sayid saying he no longer needs it.  Sayid meets up with Jack and asks him to point out north. Jack does and Sayid agrees, pulling out Locke’s compass and showing Jack that where north should be is actually northwest.  Odd right? Sayid explains that a magnetic anomaly would make the compass a few degrees off but not to the amount the compass shows. Sayid takes this to mean the compass is busted.

Boone seems to have passed out after Locke left him and wakes up when he hears Shannon screaming for help.  He tries grabbing for the knife and fails until he hears the monster roar in the distance. This gives Boone the will to reach for the knife and cut himself free.  He runs to find Shannon tied to a tree apparently by Locke. They run and hide from the monster as it pursues them. Once they think they’re in the clear they make their way back to the beach but get a shock when the monster rips a tree up from its roots (well, that’s new).  Shannon gets lifted up by the monster (we still haven’t seen what it is) and Boone searches for her eventually finding her dead (whoa…that was unexpected…).

That night, Boone finds Locke and attacks him blaming Locke on Shannon’s death.  Locke is mesmerized and asks what “it” showed Boone. He directs Boone to see Shannon alive and well with Sayid.  The paste applied to Boone’s wound was some kind of hallucinogenic that made him see Shannon’s death. When prompted how he felt, Boone confesses he felt relief (this is why healthy boundaries are necessary!).

Okay, so like I said last post, I’m not a fan of this episode.  I don’t think Boone and/or Shannon are the most-compelling characters in the show.  Their relationship is a whole other story that I think many a fans get grossed out by.  The biggest attraction point of this episode is the door in the jungle floor. That’s what we want to know about!  Well, maybe we’ll get more info next episode, which by the way is Michael and Walt’s first episode.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Whatever the Case May Be

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The episode starts with Kate up in a tree, picking fruit.  Once back on the ground, she hears what sounds like someone hiding in the trees.  She throws a rock and strikes a hiding Sawyer (that’s quite a lucky throw). He feels the need to protect her since Claire was taken (I think Kate’s proven in the series so far she doesn’t need protection).  Finding a waterfall and pool, they take a swim and down deep, they see through the gloom to find a pair of plane seats with their passengers still buckled in (nightmares…). Kate also notices a steel briefcase under one of the seats and Sawyer is able to get it.  Kate claims it belongs to her but is unable to open it without a key. Sawyer takes it for himself, intrigued by Kate’s wanting the case and then not wanting it.

The tide comes in quick and fast and forces the beachers to abandon camp and move further down and up the beach.  Sayid finds the sudden shift strange much like he did about the number of survivors in the crash. Jack asks about Rousseau wanting to meet her and ask about the Others who took Claire.  Sayid is not convinced Rousseau can help or that he heard what he heard in the jungle.


Our Plot B thread this episode focuses on Shannon and Sayid.  She’s unhappy with Boone traipsing off into the jungle with Locke each day as they “search” for Claire but as we know are being secretive with what they found.  Boone practically calls Shannon useless and not contributive to the group so when Sayid comes to ask her to help translate the French notations on the maps he took from Rousseau, she agrees to prove Boone wrong.  While she struggles to understand the writing, she eventually realizes the same words written over and over again are from a children’s movie (which sounds like Finding Nemo). There’s some obvious flirting and growing attraction between them too.


Flashback:  Kate’s in a small town bank getting a loan for a photography job, while using a different name, and a bank robbery takes place.  She gets taken hostage and when she has an opportunity to pick up and use a gun from a robber, she says she doesn’t know ow to use the gun (interesting based on what we know about her so far).

Kate is determined to get the briefcase from Sawyer and fails as he sleeps with it clenched between his knees.  He’s getting more and more intrigued as to why she wants the case so bad but she refuses to tell him why or what’s in it.  While he tries to pick the lock the next day Michael tells him if he manages to unlock that particular brand case, he’ll fly them back to LA on his back.  Taking Michael’s advice to use to open the case, Sawyer tries everything he can, which includes throwing it down from high up. Kate takes the opportunity to snatch the case but Sawyer catches up and she’s once again left without it.


Flashback:  After Kate fails to use the gun on the bank robbers, the leader takes her into an office and we learn she’s actually in on the heist (uh huh, yep).  The bank robbers get into the vault and take Kate with them. She turns on them though, shooting each of the three robbers to incapacitate them. She says she just wants a safety deposit box (Box 850 but I’m not sure this number has any significance).  She takes out a small toy plane.


Kate goes to Jack and tells him about the case belonging to the marshal who escorted her.  Apparently there are several handguns in the case (interesting…). Jack suspects there’s more she’s not saying to him.  He agrees to help her get the case from Sawyer but wants to open the case together. This also means they have to dig up the body of the marshal to get the key.  Kate tries out her sleight of hand, taking the key from the wallet once they get to the body. Jack notices her trickery (good on you Jack-o) and once he gets the case, they open it together.  He hands over an envelope asking if that’s what she wanted. She pulls out the toy plane and jack wants the truth. Kate admits the toy plane belonged to the man she loved who also happens to be the man she killed (What?!).

This episode always makes me think of it being the perfect set up episode.  There will be more to come but there is great significance in this one that I’ll point out in coming episodes.  It’s a good one overall and it further fleshes out Kate as a character. Next up is Boone and Shannon’s first episode and it’s…a strange one.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: All the Best Cowboys Have Daddy Issues

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The episode picks up where the previous one left off.  Jack and Locke rush out of the caves in search of Claire and Charlie, eventually finding Claire’s bag.  Locke thinks they were taken judging by the tracks. Jack struggles to understand why they were taken while Locke tries to keep an open mind.  Jack wants to keep searching while Locke would prefer to return to the caves and put together a search party.


Flashback:  We find out this is Jack’s second centric episode as he’s performing surgery in what appears to be an intense situation.  His dad, Christian, is there and as the female patient can’t be resuscitated tells Jack to call the time of death. Angry, Jack tells his father to call the time of death and walks off.  Turns out Jack was notified by a nurse that his dear old dad might have been under the influence of alcohol while performing the surgery on the woman. Christian denies the allegation and maintains that the car accident the woman was in was the cause for her death.  The friction between father and son surgeons is quite apparent.

Locke returns to the cave and is joined by Kate and Boone to catch up with Jack and search for Claire and Charlie.  Michael wants to help too but is told by Locke he’s not needed. Michael doesn’t appreciate the dismissal and says he’ll organize his own search party.  Locke and group catch up with Jack and Locke tells Jack he blames himself for not noticing something off about Ethan. Locke hunted with him and despite his abilities to track and hunt, Ethan is better, implying they are dealing with a superior foe.


There’s not much Plot B in this episode but we do get interactions between Walt and Hurley where both play backgammon and Walt mentions his dad, Brian not Michael, saying he’s the luckiest person he’s ever known.  Hurley can’t believe his losing streak while they play and we find out Hurley owes Walt 20 grand by the time Hurley finished playing. Walt also interacts with Sawyer, providing the scuttlebutt of Claire and Charlie being taken.  Sawyer doesn’t believe him and Walt tells Sawyer to go ask Sayid who has returned. This provides a tense moment between Sawyer and Sayid but Sawyer seems to consider the reality that there could actually be other people on the island.


Ripping apart a red shirt to mark their progress, Locke loses the trail but assures Jack he will find it again.  Jack’s not happy about playing second fiddle to Mr. Locke and Kate notices it, calling him out on his stuff (thank you, Kate).  It doesn’t help that Jack feels guilty for not believing Claire’s being attacked. Locke calls out and he finds one of the pieces of tape Charlie wrote the letters for “LATE” and placed on his fingers.  Kate pipes up and says it could be a dummy trail left by Ethan, revealing she’s got some tracking knowledge as well. Locke and Boone head in one direction and while Jack and Kate head in the other.

Boone and Locke shoot the breeze as they search for the trail.  Boone mentions Star Trek and the “red shirt” crew members (brought up because they’re using a red shirt to mark their trail) who die in every episode.  Locke seems unfamiliar with this and says they must be led by a “piss-poor captain”. An apt view. Boone asks Locke about his job in the real world and Locke reveals he was a regional collections supervisor for a box company (yep, they make boxes).  He then predicts it’s going to rain in a few seconds and it does further proving Locke has some kind of connection or understanding of the island no one else does.


Raining now, Jack and Kate eventually get separated.  Jack slips down a hillside and finds Ethan standing over him.  Jack gets a jungle beat down and Ethan threatens to kill Claire or Charlie if Jack doesn’t stop following them.  Despite the beating, Jack keeps going after Kate catches to him.

Flashback:  Jack meets his dear old dad in private and is asked to sign a report that describes the surgery and death of the car wreck patient.  Christian does a bit of manipulation and convinces Jack to sign the report despite Jack holding that his dad was not of sound mind to perform such a complex surgery.  During an inquiry with the hospital top dogs, Jack learns the woman was pregnant and in that moment says he has to speak against the report, which could very well be the thing he did that cost his dad his career and drove distance between them.


Jack and Kate happen upon a horrifying scene of Charlie hanging from a tree by his neck.  They cut him down and Jack refuses to let up on resuscitating him. Honestly, I can’t do this scene justice.  There’s so much emotion and in my opinion a powerful moment and performance by Matthew Fox as a man bent on saving a life.  While Kate tried to tell Jack Charlie was gone, Jack persisted and went back at it, using his fist in a CPR method probably not recommended.  Charlie jerks back to life and once back at the caves tells Jack “they” only wanted Claire (ominous…).

The episode ends with Locke and Boone in the middle of the night still searching for Claire and Charlie.  When Boone wants to head back to camp, Locke tosses him a flashlight and it hits something loud on the ground.  They investigate and it sounds like something hollow is underneath. Locke tells Boone they are going to find out it is.

There are a few episodes of Lost that tug on my emotions and this is one of them.  Jack trying to bring Charlie back from death is heavy on me. So good and then we have this “Others” possibility and this metal thing in the jungle to investigate and I think this is where the show opens up.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Raised By Another

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We get our motif of an eye opening to start things off.  This time it belongs to Claire who we have yet to really get much information about besides the fact that she’s Australian and pregnant.


She wakes in the caves and quickly realizes she’s not pregnant anymore, hearing a baby crying in the distance.  Right off the bat we should assume this a dream unless it’s a time jump which would be a first. She heads off into the jungle, sees a light source and walks towards it.  Turns out it’s Locke sitting at a table with some strange paraphernalia including a deck of cards. Claire asks him what’s happening and he tells her it was her responsibility but she gave him away.  He lifts his head and he has different colored eyes: one white and one black, reminding us of the backgammon pieces. She leaves him and goes back into the jungle, following the baby cries, eventually finding a crib.  She searches through the blankets inside until she finds nothing but blood. She’s ripped from the nightmare screaming bloody murder and Charlie is there noticing her palms are bloody.


Flashback:  Claire and her boyfriend, Thomas, are waiting on the results of a pregnancy test.  Once it reveals positive, Claire has doubts that they can raise a baby but Thomas thinks they can.  A friend takes Claire to see a psychic and everything is hunky dory until the psychic ends the session abruptly, giving Claire her money back without explanation.

Jack asks Claire questions about her pregnancy and how she’s feeling, saying everything checks out and she’s probably just stressed.  He finds Kate on the beach and tells her Claire’s baby is coming soon. Charlie expresses concern for Claire and tries to console her eventually expressing wanting to be more than friends.  She rebuffs him and Charlie assures her it’s alright though we all know he wants more.


That night Claire is asleep in the caves again and a hand slaps over her mouth.  She’s screaming like crazy (let me just say that the actress who plays Claire has got a scream that unnerves me like no other; she does not hold back).  Everyone is up of course, consoling her or looking for whoever attacked her but there’s no sign of an assailant. Hurley approaches Jack and makes it clear that they need to figure out who’s who in their group, making a point that they don’t who is at the caves and who is at the beach.  We also learn Hurley’s real name is Hugo, but this doesn’t seem to be a Sawyer situation. Just a nickname.

Jack is not convinced someone attacked Claire, believing that her condition is making her hallucinate.  Charlie is not happy about the diagnosis and is at odds with Jack. Hurley’s collecting names, other personal info, and reasons for traveling to Australia, getting some info from characters like Locke, Boone and Shannon, and Ethan.  He also learns that his job would be easier if he had the flight manifest from Sawyer, which gives us a funny exchange between the two including Sawyer’s less than affectionate nickname for Hurley: Staypuft.


Flashback:  Claire gets an unexpected surprise from Thomas who decides he doesn’t want to be a father now (he’s a real douche) and leaves her.  Claire goes back to the psychic in hopes to learn whether or not Thomas will return to her. The psychic tells her that her child is surrounded by danger according to his previous reading and tells her the child must be raised by her and no other.  Claire tells him she’s putting her baby up for adoption and he urges her not to make that choice. Later in her pregnancy, he calls Claire in the middle of the night the day before she goes to meet the adoption agency and parents. He tells her he has a plan but she still denies him.  At the meeting she’s unable to sign the paperwork due to no pens working (uh, weird). She takes it as a sign not to go through with the adoption and leaves, contacting the psychic again where she’s given the ticket on Oceanic 180 where parents await her arrival in Los Angeles.

Jack wants to give Claire a mild sedative and she realizes he doesn’t believe someone attacked her.  She storms to go to the beach and Charlie follows trying to convince her not to leave the safety and only doctor on the island in light of her late-stage pregnancy.  Claire stops once what looks like contractions start happening. Charlie runs to get Jack and crosses path with Ethan who says he’ll go get Jack. Charlie returns to Claire and once the contractions fade away, she tells him about the psychic and Charlie poignantly points out that maybe the psychic knew about the plane crash, knowing this was the only way Claire could raise her baby (whoa, crazy twist).


Sayid returns to the caves and tells Jack he found the French woman and also that they’re not alone on the island.  Hurley arrives in a panic and reveals that somebody he talked to wasn’t on the manifest. Shift back to Claire and Charlie and we get a creepy staring Ethan finding them without Jack.  Not good.

I’ll admit, I’m not the biggest fan of this episode.  Claire is not a character I ever gravitated towards. The true gold in this episode is the revelation that a potential “Other” has assimilated into the survivors’ group.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Solitary

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Sayid’s left the group due to his guilt for very nearly killing Sawyer by severing an artery in his arm.  Jack saved him but shame plagues Sayid and he’s off on his own now sitting on a beach and looking at the picture of the unnamed woman.  He looks off to his left and notices something sticking up in sand. He investigates and finds a rather large cable that goes out into the ocean (strange…).  He grabs the cable and follows it into the opposite direction: the jungle.


Along the way, he finds a tripwire and steps over it only to spring another trap that grabs his leg and pulls up in the air upside down (I’m not sure what the proper name is for this kind of trap but now I really want to research traps).  He catches a broken branch in his leg and is left to hang there for hours until nightfall. He hears someone approaching in the dark and is cut free only to pass out once he’s on the ground.


Flashback:  We get Sayid in uniform interrogating another man in what we can surmise is the early 90s, due to our knowing he served in the Republican Guard during the Gulf War.  He talks to a superior officer as a woman prisoner is led by guards past them. Sayid meets her eyes and there’s some recognition there. Why? Because she’s the woman in the picture!  We find out her name is Nadia and she and Sayid knew each other when they were children but went on different paths. She’s being accused of a crime and Sayid is tasked to get information that could lead to arrests of her affiliates.  She refuses even though she knows Sayid is going to hurt her.

Plot B is a fun one in this episode.  Jack’s doing his best to keep everyone alive and healthy while stress and other anxieties begin to take their toll on everyone.  Kate blames Jack for Sayid’s leaving so they’re a bit on the outs. Sawyer gives Jack-o a new nickname: Dr Quinn (I laugh every time) and their triangle with Kate continues to build steam.  Hurley takes it upon himself to find some kind of de-stresser. When Locke and a man named, Ethan, return in the night with plane crash findings, Hurley gets excited upon finding something we’re not shown quite yet.


Michael shows Jack a drawing of a water filtration device, which will divert their supply to washing and drinking stations.  We learn Michael was an artist along with being in construction. They both eventually get summoned by Charlie to go and meet Hurley outside of the caves and we learn Hurley found golf clubs and created a two-hole golf course (even we in the audience needed this reprieve from the craziness of the island).  I’ll also point out that Walt feels left out and bored, eventually going off to find Locke who’s practicing his knife throwing skills.

When we get back to Sayid, he’s shackled to a metal bed frame confused and being asked by a woman in the shadows where someone named Alex is in several different languages.  Sayid tries his best to figure out where he is and who has him strapped to the bed. But his inability to provide sufficient answers earns him electric shock treatment. The woman reveals she’s the French woman who made the distress call (yep, she’s alive).  We learn her name is Rousseau and was part of a scientific expedition who’s ship crashed on the island after their instruments stopped working (because of the island?). She and her crew did their best to survive but she claims her fellow scientists, which included her beau, Robert, got sick and were not themselves.


There’s a lot of back and forth discussion between Sayid and Rousseau as they learn about each other, trust being earned when Sayid offers to fix a broken music box of hers.  What I would say is the most intriguing part of the information learned from Rousseau is that there are other people on the island she appropriately calls, “The Others”, who she seems to think Sayid is until she’s convinced otherwise.  Apparently she hasn’t seen these Others but has heard them. When they hear a roar outside her underground shelter, she claims it’s one of the bears. Sayid breaks free from his restraints, grabs supplies, a map of the island, and a rifle but forgets Nadia’s pictures.

Flashback:  Sayid is told to execute Nadia and he plans to release her, not fleeing with her because he knows his family will be killed if he does.  His superior officer shows up and is shot by Sayid. Nadia pleads further for him to run but he shoots himself, staging her escape to protect himself.  She gives him a letter and the picture of her as parting gifts.


Sayid sneaks up on Rousseau and when she raises her rifle at him, he pulls the trigger finding the firing pin has been removed.  Rousseau declines his offer to go back to his group and tells him to watch his people and be wary of them. Sayid asks her who Alex is and we learn it was her child.

The episode ends with Sayid returning to his group and suddenly stops as the wounds of whispers surround him (creepy…).

I always feel like this episode has a fair bit of levity in it with the golf scenes.  Sayid’s moments are important to his character and introducing us to Rousseau while also signaling to possible other people on the island.  We’re still in the “all killer” episodes at this point. So many great moments!

Lost Season 1 Re-watch : Confidence Man

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Kate’s walking along the beach and finds Sawyer’s clothes and favorite book, Watership Down, bundled together.  He arises from the shallows and proceeds to flirt with her as we’re accustomed to seeing. In this quick opening, we’re reminded of Sawyer’s affinity for Kate, which is important to the episode.


Flashback:  Sawyer’s in bed with a woman in a hotel room and he’s told the time and freaks out, saying he needs to get to a meeting.  He grabs a briefcase and it opens revealing stacks of cash. The woman, Jess, asks about the money because any sane person would and Sawyer proceeds to tell her he has an investment opportunity for oil drilling but only has a portion of the money.  His meeting that afternoon is with another potential investor. Jess makes a play and offers to be his partner investor using her husband’s money (aha, the plot thickens).

While traipsing (I love that word) through the jungle, noises alert Sawyer and he finds Boone going through his stash.  Uh oh.

Jack is tending to Sayid’s head wound in the caves, learning about how Sayid’s plan was sabotaged.  Boone is brought in all bloodied up from getting a beating by Sawyer. Boone explains to Jack that he was looking for Shannon’s asthma medicine in Sawyer’s stash believing the medicine was there because Sawyer was reading Boone’s book, Watership Down.

There’s no real Plot B storyline in this episode besides Charlie and Claire getting closer.  They talk about food they miss and Claire reveals she craves peanut butter. Charlie promises to find her some and goes to Hurley, implicating Hurley might have a hoard of food, which is presumed because Hurley is what might be described as hefty.  Charlie apologizes for the bad form and eventually settles for bringing Claire an empty jar and make believing peanut butter inside. It’s cute and definitely shows the progression of their relationship but otherwise doesn’t propel the story forward.

Back to the good stuff!

Jack shows up to Sawyer’s tent and begins rummaging through things telling Sawyer to give him Shannon’s medicine.  Sawyer doesn’t appreciate it and before they can throw down Kate shows up. She tells a storming off Jack that she can get the medicine from Sawyer because according to him they a connection (whatever that means).


She asks and Sawyer says he’ll hand over the medicine for a kiss.  Kate declines of course and begins to tell Sawyer she knows he’s putting on a front as a guy who’s the enemy of the people.  She mentions the letter we’ve seen him read on multiple occasions and he hands it over, telling her to read it out loud. The letter is written by a kid saying he knows Sawyer slept with his mother and got his father to give him his money.  The kid reveals his dad killed his mother and then himself, blaming Sawyer for his parents being dead (woo, heavy…).


Sayid’s on his mission to determine who sabotaged his mission and confronts Locke, asking his whereabouts.  Locke says he was skinning a boar and couldn’t be accounted for but tells Sayid that someone who wanted to sabotage a rescue would be someone who is benefiting and profiting off of their current circumstances.  Locke implicates Sawyer but Sayid claims Sawyer had an alibi, setting off Kate’s bottle rocket which was too far for him to get to Sayid.  Locke says a delayed fuse could have been made using a cigarette and hands over a knife just in case there’s a next time (that’s foreshadowing if I’ve ever seen it before).

While Jack continues to try to help Shannon, he and Sayid form up to take Sawyer and make him give over the medicine.  Sayid reveals while in the Republican Guard, his training involved getting information from the enemy.


Sawyer wakes up from a nap to see Sayid before getting knocked out and is dragged into the jungle.  Kate tries to intervene but Jack shoots her down. Once awake, Sayid shows Sawyer the carved bamboo shoots he plans to press up under his fingernails (I still cringe every time I watch this scene).  Sawyer refuses to speak despite Sayid’s efforts and when he’s threatened to lose an eye, he tells them he’ll only tell Kate where the medicine is.

She arrives and Sawyer tries his luck with the kiss payment, which she obliges much to her chagrin.  Afterwards, he tells her he doesn’t have the medicine. Kate gives him a nice strike against the face and tells Jack and Sayid that Sawyer doesn’t have the medicine.  Sayid confronts Sawyer again and the two tussel as Sawyer breaks free from his constraints. Sayid uses his Locke-given knife to stab Sawyer in the arm severing an artery.  Jack jumps in and saves Sawyer even though Sawyer tells Jack to let him die and that if the tables were turned, he’d let Jack die (harsh, man…harsh).


Flashback:  Sawyer meets with Jess and her husband, David, to go over the investment opportunity.  David is reluctant not trusting Sawyer. Sawyer offers to let David handle his half of the money overnight, earning trust.  Next we see Sawyer in a bar where he’s explaining his plan to the actual owner of his half of the money (happening to be 160K).  Sawyer gets threatened and told he better deliver all the money come tomorrow. The next day Sawyer is finalizing the deal with his marks but is conflicted once their son shows up.  Sawyer has a change of heart and calls the deal off even though he’s likely going to be putting his life at risk (no bueno, man).


Sawyer wakes up and finds himself stitched up.  Kate’s there and tells him she’s been reading the letter and figures out from a stamp that it was actual Sawyer who wrote the letter as a kid.  Exposed, he tells her a confidence man named Sawyer conned his parents which led to their deaths. As he got older he needed money quick and figured out how to con a man and woman assuming the identity of the man who ruined his life.  Talk about tragedy.


Jack returns to the caves and finds Sun (with the help of Michael) has located eucalyptus leaves to help Shannon’s breathing.  Sayid announces what he did do Sawyer was something he vowed never to do again so he decides to self-banish himself away from the group.

Another strong episode and one that I think makes Sawyer a far more sympathetic character than originally laid out for the viewers.  He’s multi-layered and this will come out in later episodes. The more I watch this show, the more I realize how much he grows as a character.

Flash Fiction: Following the Dead Trail

Shade lions concealed their presence better than any creature in Breshtk, proving the most-difficult predators the Ajjuun dealt with throughout the grasslands.  Small traces of their kills had to be dug up in order to track the animals.  Even then, trails could take hours to find.

Hijeneva crouched a few feet from the mess of entrails piled before her, looking past the gore and able to see the direction of her target’s path.  One of the other-worldly creatures—a demon from the Agony—but a second had left just as much death and destruction in the village.  This one had escaped Ajjuun justice.

Chatter from behind forced her jaw to clench.  Her three suitors crouched a mere few strides behind her but struggled to maintain any sense of composure.  These three had earned her favor, chosen to prove themselves if they wished to wed her.  Their pale faces masked in ash blinked in waiting as they noticed her gaze.

Unconsciously, Hijeneva touched the leather pouch at her waist which held the god’s relics.  Soon, they would all be tested.  Soon, her suitors would face her ultimate test if they were to be worthy of her maidenhood.

Saying nothing, she continued along the dead trail, hearing the near silent movements of her suitors.  If any of the three lacked that simple ability of quiet pursuit, she would send them back to the tribe in shame.

Laughter pulled her eyes back to the dead trail.  Within a copse of trees, the bloody line led straight into the wooded shadows; the bone-chilling sound dared her to advance closer.  Rising from her stance, heart racing and anger twisting in her chest, she reached for the leather pouch.  The time for her suiters to prove their worth had come.

Hijeneva motioned the men forward, opened the pouch, made the contents available and waited.  All the while, the mocking laughter continued.  One by one, they took the pieces, not questioning her or the origin of the items.

Dagal, the tallest and thinnest of her suitors, hesitated by rubbing his unshaven chin where dark stubble curled.  His dark eyes caught hers and he reached in grabbing the armlet with the dull gold-colored stone.  Hijeneva watched, not daring to blink, to see what influence the stone might have on him if any.  Nothing.

The squat but solid, Bjuno, reached in without waiting and took the silver hand mirror, looking into the reflection for longer than she would have expected.  He did not show much care for his appearance before but she could say nothing when the third suitor, Malistin, reached in and took the four coins not waiting for her to offer the pouch.

Malstin raised one of the coins and held it to the sun.  “A shining—”  His voice stopped abruptly and so did the laughter in the trees.  His gaze turned to the three coins in his other hand.  Steam or smoke rose from his half-clenched palm.  He began to scream, waving his hand to free his flesh from the coins but nothing fell away.

Laughter from the trees started again but it moved out and to the group’s left, drawing fearful eyes.  The black oily form of the creature moved casually but its path was a closing circle.

Hijeneva reached for her tiil in time to hear Dagal curse and raise his bow as the creature advanced.  Screams and laughter filled the air.  Blood and more blood marred the land.  The world stilled to see if a survivor would remain.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: The Moth

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(Side Note:  I am unable to upload new pictures at the time. Sorry about the delay.)

We get to Charlie’s first centric episode and he’s in a bad way.  We’ve had the luxury of seeing a lot of who Charlie is from the first episode.  He’s a drug addict and been getting his fixes whenever the need strikes.  Locke knows his secret and has stepped up personally to provide a way for Charlie to find help.

Dealing with his withdrawals, we get to see Charlie feeling out of place, wanting to help around the cave but not needed, which he doesn’t appreciate.  Locke tries to help him and in doing so uses Charlie as bait for a boar (very messed up, I might add).  Charlie makes a request for his drugs, revealing Locke’s in possession of the last of Charlie’s stash.  Locke tells Charlie he’s stronger than he thinks and Locke will give him three times to ask for his drugs before finally handing them over.


Plot B of this episode goes back to Sayid’s plan to find the French woman’s distress call source.  He’s somehow manufactured three antennas to triangulate the source.  One problem is he needs a battery to power the transceiver.  Kate knows where to find one and that involves including Sawyer in the mix (always a fun interaction when Sawyer’s involved; pure snarkiness).  Using bottle rockets to provide signals once the antennas are all in position, Sayid, Kate, and Boone put the plan in motion.


Flashback:  Here we get to see Charlie’s progression into “rock stardom”.  He’s on the verge of quitting his band, Driveshaft, due to things getting a little out of hand with the ladies (full salacious conviction offered to a priest) but Charlie’s brother, Liam, has a recording contract in hand and convinces Charlie to keep going with the dream.  Charlie obliges but makes Liam promise that if things get out of hand, they walk away.  What could go wrong?!


Feeling unappreciated, Charlie confronts Jack in a separate cave from the main one where everyone is living and raises his voice a little too loud, causing a cave-in.  Charlie makes it out but Jack is trapped.  A rescue attempt takes place led by Michael who turns out to be experienced in construction.  Feeling responsible, Charlie goes to Locke and asks for his drugs again.  That’s two.  In an attempt to leave Charlie with some wisdom, Locke shows him a cocoon explaining it belongs to a moth.  Locke says he could use his knife to help the moth break free from its cocoon but to do so would make the moth weak and unable to survive (Mr. Locke handing out life lessons!).

Sayid and Kate are out in the jungle, going to their prospective antenna locations and they discuss the plane crash.  Sayid is convinced the crash was not normal saying the plane broke apart in midair and their section of the plane crashed on the island with over forty survivors.  That should not have happened according to him.  Sawyer shows up to tell Kate about Jack but when he’s met with a bristling Kate, he negates to follow through and offers to help them (pretty shady).


Flashback:  Driveshaft is in the thick smoke and sweat of stardom and things have gotten a bit out of hand.  Liam has taken charge of the band and is openly becoming a junkie.  Charlie gets to the end of his rope and tells Liam they are walking away but gets rebuffed by Liam, leaving a distraught Charlie to contemplate what’s happened.  Jump forward to an undisclosed amount of years and Charlie’s in Sydney to track down a clean and sober Liam who has no interest in returning to the band to make a comeback.  He and Charlie have switched roles and Charlie actually blames his brother for his junkie state.


Charlie offers to climb into the cave where Jack is after Michael and the group make a small opening.  Another collapse takes place after Charlie gets through and efforts to free them have to continue.  Jack realizes Charlie’s in withdrawal and offers to help him (if they ever get out), telling Charlie he’s not worthless and an asset to the group.  Charlie notices a moth flying around in the cave and finds another way out.  He and Jack escape the cave surprising everyone and Charlie’s praised for his heroism (hugs all around!)

Bit of a backtrack because these plot threads are woven together from time to time and don’t make for an easy recap but Boone ran off to help with the cave-in and left Shannon in charge of his antenna.  Sayid left Kate and Sawyer with theirs as he climbed to higher ground to set up his antenna.  While they wait for Sayid, Kate and Sawyer are bantering, obviously at odds, and Sawyer lets slip about Jack’s situation.  Kate leaves him to help free Jack and we’re left to wonder if Sawyer will follow through with the plan.  Sayid launches his bottle rocket and we see Shannon and Sawyer launch theirs.  Sayid turns the transceiver on but before he can get a clear signal, he gets hit in the head from behind by an unknown person.  Not good.


The episode ends with Charlie going to Locke and asking for his drugs for the third and final time.  Locke is apprehensive but follows through.  Charlie throws the last of his stash in the fire and I don’t know about you but it’s an awesome moment that hits all the right beats for this character who continues to grow on me.

Again, another strong episode.  Charlie is one of those complex characters in the show that I don’t think got enough recognition at times.  His journey so far is so great to watch.  Locke continues to be an even stronger force on the show (probably why actor, Terry O’Quinn, won an Emmy for this role).

Next we get Sawyer’s first centric episode.  If memory serves right, it’s equally strong and might be one of my early favorites.  Just a reminder that this will be posted on October 3rd.  The last post of this month will be the new Shoals to the Hallowed flash fiction story.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch : House of the Rising Sun

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We get our first Sun-centric episode and we know it’s Sun-centric because the episode opens with her eye opening and as we know, this is Lost’s signature motif in these first season episodes.  We don’t know much about Sun and Jin, getting very little of their relationship except that Jin seems to be a very controlling husband.

Flashback:  The flashbacks consist of Sun and Jin’s relationship starting with their early days before marriage where we learn Sun comes from a wealthy family and Jin does not.  We see them together at a party but in different roles.  Sun is attending and Jin is serving as a waiter, revealing himself to be kind and loving, giving her a flower, which will come into play later.

Plot B of the episode focuses on the survivors collecting water from the cave Jack found.  We get a whole lot of Jack and Kate flirting and Jack’s wanting to bring the survivors to the cave and water instead of making water hauling trips multiple times a day.  Kate and Sayid are not that interested for fear of missing a chance to signal a rescue from the beach.

Things get crazy when out of nowhere Jin attacks Michael and beats the crap out of him.  The language barrier proves to be just that as no one can get answers from either Jin or Sun for the cause of Jin’s sudden violence.  This all makes sense though as we see more flashbacks.

Flashback:  Not knowing the time jumps of each flashback (there are several and woven throughout the episode) when they occur, Jin talks to Sun’s father offscreen and tells her that he has earned the right to propose to her but he has to devote a year to working for her father.  She’s not happy about that but Jin is adamant that it’s the right way to do things.  Months later, Sun gets home and finds she has a present from Jin—a dog!  Months later again, the dog is much bigger now, Jin shows up to their home with blood all over his hands.  Sun confronts him and he says he does what her father asks of him (sounds like Sun has a “Father of the Year” nominee as well).  Obviously, Jin is not the same man he was when we first saw them together and he’s become someone Sun doesn’t know anymore.

In what I’ll call Plot B-a, while the water group of Jack, Kate, Locke, and Charlie get to the cave, Charlie decides it’s a great time to take a hit of his drugs but is caught by Locke who warns him not to move when Charlie somehow didn’t realize he was standing on a beehive (yes, a beehive on the ground).  Charlie moves, breaks the hive, and the group has to get away from the flurry of bees.  Jack and Kate end up finding two bodies—a man and woman—in the cave.  Jack claims they’ve been dead for 40-50 years and finds two stones (one black and one white—that’s familiar now isn’t it to Locke’s backgammon pieces).

Jack and Kate take the water back to the beach and Locke stays to help Charlie look through wreckage.  Locke recognizes Charlie from Driveshaft and asks about Charlie’s guitar, which he checked on the plane.  Obviously missing it, Locke asks Charlie if he wants his guitar more than his drug telling him he will see his guitar again because the island gives people their heart’s desire.  But, they have to be willing to give something in return (apparently, Mr. Locke has become the all-knowing Oz of the island).  Charlie hands over his drugs and Locke tells him to look up.  Low and behold, his guitar is caught in some vines above them.  Charlie’s reaction is priceless.  Such a great moment!

Flashback:  Sun meets with an interior designer but it turns out the woman is actually behind a plan so Sun can escape Jin and her old life.  Looks like she wants to runaway and disappear in Sydney, faking a kidnapping, and eventually her death.  Things with Jin have gotten bad.

A small moment between Walt and Michael reveal Walt’s mother never talked about Michael.  They start to banter and start asking each other questions to see if they know each other, which they don’t besides some very basic info.  Michael heads off into the jungle to cut some firewood and Sun follows him and boom!  She speaks English.  What?!  Who saw that coming?  She says Jin attacked him because Michael is wearing a watch he found in the wreckage that belonged to her father.  Also, Jin doesn’t know Sun speaks English making things more complicated.  Michael cuts Jin free from being handcuffed to the piece of plane debris now understanding why Jin attacked him but he’s not ready to make amends with Jin.

The survivors are divided (locationally) as Jack takes those interested in staying in the cave while Sayid, Kate, Sawyer, and others stay on the beach hoping to signal a rescue.

Flashback:  In the Sydney airport, Sun gets ready to disappear from Jin, obviously conflicted about the decision.  She’s about to leave when she makes eye contact with Jin and he shows her a flower which is what he first gave her before they were engaged.  She sees the man she fell in love with, past the hard exterior made from working for her father.  She joins him and stays with him.

Definitely a good episode as we get more information on characters.  I’ll be honest, my favorite part of this episode is Locke and Charlie’s interaction.  There’s something about it that hits me in the feels every time.  I do like the complexity of Jin and Sun’s relationship and look forward to how that shapes up in the coming episodes.

Next is Charlie’s first centric episode!  It’s a good one!

Lost Season 1 Re-watch : White Rabbit

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We get another “eye-opening” opening (there’s our official motif for this show) of a young Jack being told to stay down on the ground while some older bullies beat up on another kid.  Young Jack-o doesn’t listen and gets popped in the face before older Jack’s name is being called out while staring out into nothing on the beach.

Jack realizes someone is calling out for help in the water and he dives into action (pun uh-thank you).  Once he gets out deeper, he goes under water and comes up with Boone.  Starting to swim back, Boone says he was trying to save her and Jack sees a woman further out calling for help.  Alas, Jack gets back to shore with Boone and goes back out to save the woman.

Turns out a woman named Joanna went out for a swim and couldn’t stay above water pulled out by a riptide.  Jack tells Kate he didn’t try hard enough to save Joanna and while he’s talking to her he sees the man in the suit standing out in the water, waist deep.  Kate can’t see the man though.  So creepy.

Our Plot B storyline focuses on the dwindling water supply and the group’s need to find drinkable water.  We get some minor moments worth calling out:  Sun and Jin continue to be on the outs due to the language barrier; Claire and Kate gab a bit (I hope that’s not insensitive to say; I’ll use it for all genders just in case); Shannon tries to bargain with Sawyer for insect repellant (side note:  Sawyer’s reading Watership Down; books are a big part of the show and appear from time to time with the plot of the book having some kind of influence on the show).

Jack is inundated with people looking to him for leadership and he’s struggling to embrace that role.  Hurley and Charlie get the ball rolling by asking about the water supply.  Add in a brooding Boone telling Jack he could have swam back on his own and Jack should’ve gone after Joanna and Jack’s close to the edge.  The man in the suit appears again and Jack runs into the jungle to confront the creepy apparition.

Flashback:  We’re with young Jack again and he talks to his dad, Christian, who is a surgeon (a son following in his father’s footsteps) and tells Jack he doesn’t have the stuff to be a hero after Jack tells him what happened with the fight at school.  Dad of the Year award nominee right here.  Shift to adult Jack who is told his father’s gone by his mother and is asked to locate his father’s whereabouts.  They haven’t talked for two months due to a falling out, which Jack is alluded to being responsible for.  Where is his dad?  Australia.  Aha!  Jack gets to his dad’s hotel room in Sydney and finds out he hasn’t been there for three days.  There’s plenty of medication bottles and liquor bottles in the room along with his wallet.

Jack reaches the man in the suit who turns around, falls onto the ground, and says, “Dad?”  Uh wut?  How is that happening?  A very creepy-staring Christian says nothing turns around and walks deeper in the jungle and Jack gives chase.

Claire collapses and while Charlie runs to get water, he realizes the stash has been stolen.  After Kate and Sayid take over leadership duties, determined to find the stolen water, Locke offers to go find Jack saying he knows where to look. Sawyer becomes the prime suspect because he’s determined to be the most-hated person in the group.  Kate follows him to where he has his stash of looted goods hidden but discovers he wasn’t behind the water pinch.

Jack’s running like a crazy man in search of his ghost-like dad until he slips and nearly falls to his death off a cliff, grabbing a tree vine for dear life.  Lucky Locke shows up to save him just in time.  We get a great exchange between Locke and Jack here which I’ll try to recap though it’s better on screen.  Jack doesn’t want to be the leader, saying he doesn’t have the stuff to succeed.  Locke asks why Jack’s out in the jungle and finds out Jack is chasing after something to which Locke mentions the white rabbit from Alice in Wonderland (our second literary reference!).   Locke says the island is special and different and they all feel it but won’t talk about it.  He says he’s looked into the eye of the island (whatever that means) and he saw something beautiful.

Left to contemplate his predicament, Jack hears the sound of ice clinking in a glass, runs in the direction of the sound, and comes upon a cave where there’s running water and what appears to be items from the plane crash.  Surprising enough, there’s a coffin which happens to be belonging to his father, which he identified in Sydney.  Jack opens it and finds it empty which only extends the mystery of his seeing his father in the jungle.  We  know the island healed Locke’s spinal injury but did the island bring Christian back from the dead?  Difficult to say at this point.

The episode closes out with Claire getting water from Boone of all people and he’s caught by Charlie.  The group starts to turn on Boone, realizing he stole the water but not to be a jerk, instead seeing it as an opportunity to take charge seeing as how it was left out in the open.  Jack shows up before the mob can string up the noose (not really of course) to tell everyone Boone risked his life for Joanna that morning and now they’re ready to crucify him.  He tells them he found water and shelter.  He delivers his famous, “If we can’t live together, we’re gonna die alone,” speech and assumes his role as leader, somehow coming to the conclusion that he does have the stuff to lead.

A very solid episode and one I really like.  The mystery of the island expands and we get more character beats that help define who these people are.  The Jack and Locke interaction alone make the episode strong.

Next we look at Sun’s first centric episodes.  I originally thought I would cover two episodes in each of the following posts until we got to the end of the re-watch.  This isn’t likely to happen unless I want to extend my capacity and write three thousand word posts.  So, I’ve decided to do one episode a post until the end.  That means I’ll be writing about Lost until the end of November.  Hope you’re in it till the end with me!

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Walkabout

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Things start with another eye opening (one more time of this and we got ourselves a motif!).  This time it belongs to our backgammon-loving bald man, John Locke.  We’re back on the beach with him during the first minutes of the crash on the island.  Locke seems perplexed by the situation and pays special attention to his foot for some reason.  We’re pulled back into the present at night with some kind of ruckus taking place in the camp.  Turns out the island has a boar problem and now the survivors have to deal with it.

After four days of no sign of rescue, Jack leads the discussion of burning the fuselage along with the bodies of the dead inside.  He gets some push back from Sayid who believes it would be disrespectful to the dead to treat their remains in this way but Jack is not swayed knowing the boars will continue to be a problem along with the bodies getting nice and rotten inside.  Burning them and the fuselage seems to be wise both for health reasons and doing so at night makes for a very large fire that could be seen from the ocean.

Things are getting bad in the group as the food supply has run low save for peanuts which Hurley and Sawyer are arguing over.  We get a fun exchange and while Sawyer takes a seat in some plane seats, a rather large knife flies into the seat next to him.

Turns out, our good friend, Locke, has checked a case of more large knives and managed to recover them from the crash (that’s lucky and convenient!).  Locke reveals he’s got quite the bevy of knowledge about boars and how to hunt them which leads us to believe he’s quite the hunter/adventurer.

In what I’ll call “Plot B” of the episode, Sayid has a plan to set up antennas to triangulate the source of the French woman’s distress signal.  He believes there must be a significant power source in order for the signal to be playing for 16 years.  Kate agrees and wants to help him so she offers to go with Locke on the boar hunt.  Jack makes an observation that Kate doesn’t appear to like to stay in one place too long which makes sense from what we know of her life before the island.

Michael joins the hunt in order to get to know Locke better since Walt has taken to calling Locke his friend.  Michael asks Sun to watch Walt in a pretty comedic way of using hand gestures and talking slowly hoping she’ll understand.  The rest of the survivors are collecting what they can of the wreck in preparation to burn the fuselage.

Flashback:  Locke answers a phone and talks with another person as if they are involved in some kind of military operation.  He is interrupted by what appears to be a supervisor and we see Locke is actually sitting in an office cubicle that appears very common.  Locke and a co-worker are playing a Risk-like game during their lunch break and the supervisor from earlier, whose name is Randy, shows up and mocks Locke, asking what a “walkabout” is after taking a brochure from his desk.  We learn that Locke has scheduled to go on a walkabout in Australia and Randy questions his ability to do so.  Locke tells Randy, “Don’t tell me what I can’t do” which will become a motto for him in episodes to come.

Locke talks to a woman named Helen on the phone and he invites her to go with him to Australia but we learn quickly that Helen is part of some kind of call service and Locke pays $89.95 an hour (yeesh, that’s costly) to talk to her which apparently he’s been doing for several months.  She refuses his invitation and we’re left with a bereft Locke and a man who seems to have very unhealthy relationships (as far as we can tell).

Some very minor threads are taking place on the beach in which Claire asks Jack to speak some words while they burn the fuselage but he refuses, Sayid gets a letter and pictures of a woman he thought were lost in the crash, Shannon tries to prove she can fend for herself and manipulates Charlie to catch her a fish (we also get a great comedic scene of him recruiting Hurley to help him), and Boone asks Jack to go speak to Rose, the woman he saved on the beach, as she sits off in the distance staring out into the ocean.

Locke gives Kate and Michael a lesson in boar hunting.  We learn Michael wasn’t a part of Walt’s life until two weeks prior when his mother passed away (this explains the lack of relationship between the two).  They are surprised and attacked by a boar.  Michael gets wounded while Locke is on his back in shock before he looks at his foot again (okay…why?).  Kate tells Locke they need to stop and get Michael back to the camp but Locke continues, giving us his favorite line, “Don’t tell me what I can’t do.”

Kate and Michael stop so she can put the antenna up in a tree but drops it when the monster roars and notices the trees moving in the direction of Locke (I swear this thing is a dinosaur).  Just as Locke comes across the boars, the monster arrives and while we don’t see it (sneaky sneaky show.  Not cool), we do see Locke’s bewildered reaction to it (such a tease).

Obviously wanting to stay away from the fuselage and people’s requests, Jack spends time with Rose and while he thinks she can honor her husband who was on the flight but in the tail section that broke off midair, Rose denies her husband being dead.  Jack struggles with this but they agree to head back to the others as the sun sets.  In the distance, Jack sees a man in a suit off in the distance watching him.  Freaky…

Kate gets back with Michael but believes the monster got Locke.  The antenna is broken and Sayid is frustrated but willing to try again.  While talking to Kate, Jack sees the man in the suit again and runs into the jungle but he finds a blood-covered Locke instead who has bagged himself a hefty-sized boar (bacon in the morning!).

The fuselage is burning and the group honors the dead the best way they can (mostly saying names and sharing whatever info could be found in their luggage).  Michael asks Locke if he saw the monster and Locke says he saw nothing (such a liar!).

Flashback:  Locke is in Australia and being told he cannot take part in the walkabout.  He argues and is told he neglected to speak of his condition and cannot take part in the experience.  As the bus leaves, Locke turns around in a wheelchair.  WHAT?!  He screams about destiny and “Don’t tell me what I can’t do!”  Shift back to the plane crash on the beach and Locke is somehow healed of whatever injury confined him to a wheelchair.  Amazing!!!

Okay, I love this episode.  Please watch it if you haven’t.  My recap and review don’t do it justice.  We get a great introduction to an amazing character who has an interesting backstory and while his previous life has some questions that need answering, we also learn that the island has somehow healed Locke.

Next episode focuses on Jack and we get some info on the man in the suit.  Feel free to watch ahead and remember to leave comments about your favorite moments in the episode!  Thanks!

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Tabula Rasa

posted in: Film/TV, Lost, Review | 0

Before I get started with the episode breakdown, I wanted to point something out.  This show has a lot of characters and a lot of plot lines.  Throw in the Flashback scenes which come and go, interwoven throughout the episode, and there are a lot of things to cover and call out.  I am going to play with how I format each episode depending on the focus character, which in this episode is Kate, and the other sub-storylines.  I want to avoid a play-by-play format (I know I did this for the pilot episodes but that was intentional to introduce characters) and make the post an easy read.  Onto the episode!

As I said, this episode is Kate-centric.  We know she’s a criminal of sorts being handcuffed on the plane and being escorted by a U.S. Marshall.  We get some answers but are left in the shadows a bit as well.  Jack is told she’s dangerous by the marshall who is in a bad way due to his injuries.  Told to go through the marshall’s pockets, Jack finds a mugshot print out and Jack’s got some obvious conflicting feelings towards Kate.  Hurley finds the mugshot because Jack is the worst hider ever and warns Hurley that it’s none of their business and not to be worried (oh those feelings are gonna bite you, Jack-o).

Kate’s still with the hiking party and as darkness falls, they decide to set up camp.  These scenes were good for character dynamics as we see Sayid try to make sense of where their island might be in the world.  He’s a smart guy and also knows that if they share what they discovered, they could erase the hope of the survivors which could be detrimental in the long run.  Sawyer on the other hand is more concerned with what the French woman’s distress transmission means.  He also aptly gives Kate a new nickname: Freckles (we’ll see that Sawyer has an affinity for nicknames and some are not so nice).

In the middle of the night while everyone’s asleep, Boone decides he’s going to take watch but makes a mistake by taking the gun off Sawyer and the bullets off Sayid.  Bad blood brews and Shannon suggests Kate should be the one to hold both gun and ammo (remember, none of them know what we know about her being a criminal).  Quick note:  We also learned Oceanic flight 815 was bound for Los Angeles, which isn’t that important but good to know.

Flashback:  This episode’s flashback reveals Kate was nowhere near Sydney (where flight 815 took off from) and sleeping in a sheep pen.  The farmer, Ray, gives her a job and a room to help him work the farm, which she does for an undisclosed amount of time.  Kate isn’t the type to stay in the same place for too long and tries to leave in the middle of the night before Farmer Ray offers to drive her to the nearest train station.  It’s a ruse though as our good friend the U.S. Marshall shows up during the drive.  Turns out Farmer Ray couldn’t pass up a $23,000 reward for turning Kate in.  Kate grabs the wheel of Farmer Ray’s truck and they wreck.  She could have got away from the scene but Kate saves Ray, gets caught, and we’re left wondering how bad she could be for doing such a selfless act.

When the hikers arrive at the beach, Sayid tells everyone they need electrical equipment to boost the signal of the transceiver.  He takes charge and begins to organize groups to collect water and ration food.  Kate feels the need to tell Jack the truth about the French woman’s transmission and he gives her a chance to come clean about her outlaw life but she doesn’t give in.

Still focused on saving the marshall, Jack goes into the fuselage to search for stronger antibiotics.  While in there, we get our first one on one interaction between him and Sawyer who was looting for what he thought valuable: cigarettes, alcohol, and other accouterments.  This exchange is valuable because we see something between both men and Kate.  There’s a dynamic there that offers up a noteworthy love triangle in the making.

Some of the minor threads of the episode focus on our other survivors.  Claire and Charlie seem to be forming a bond.  Jin shows affection towards Sun, which is surprising given his previous moments with her.  Michael and Walt continue to have their issues which Walt attributes to Michael’s inability to find his dog, Vincent.  Probably the most interesting thread though is Locke’s carving a whistle (that’s some ingenuity right there), calling Vincent to him, and then letting Michael get the credit for reuniting a dog and his boy.

The end of the episode intensifies as Kate confronts the marshall, he wakes up, and tries to strangle her.  Jack arrives just in time to stop the struggle and tells Kate he saw the mugshot.  Kate presses Jack asking him to put the marshall out of his misery but Jack refuses saying he is not a murderer and off-handedly insinuates to Kate that she is (a curious implication since he doesn’t know for sure what her crimes were).

Hurley warns Jack he saw Kate strapped with a gun and Jack rushes to the tent but finds Kate walking away.  However, a gunshot rings through the night, which is followed by Sawyer leaving the tent, making it clear he did what Jack wouldn’t.  Then come the sounds of the marshall coughing inside.  Sawyer failed Anatomy 101 because while aiming for the marshall’s heart, he missed and the poor man is suffering worse than before.  Jack, thankfully, ends the marshall’s suffering and man was that heavy drama.

The episode closes out with Jack telling Kate that their old lives don’t matter.  They all have a clean slate (tabula rasa) so to speak.  That’s a curious statement because if a rescue comes, you can be sure she wouldn’t be suddenly forgiven of her crimes.

All in all, I liked the episode.  We get some answers about Kate and we see relationships building.  No real mysteries were raised or solved.  A solid episode nonetheless.

Next time we get our first Locke episode “Walkabout” and it’s by far one of my favorite episodes of Lost all time.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch: Pilot Part 1 and 2

posted in: Film/TV, Lost, Review | 2

Eye opening!  We see a man in a suit waking up in a jungle, surprised by a labrador (golden retriever?) who eventually runs off.  Obviously confused and likely injured, the man in the suit moves his way out of the surrounding jungle—the camera stays ominously on a single shoe hanging in a tree.  Creepy.

Once out of the jungle, the man in the suit finds himself near a beach.  Screams and the sound of an engine draw him to a scene of chaos where part of the fuselage of a plane has crashed on the beach.  Our unnamed hero goes into action helping those he can including a pregnant woman and another woman who’s not breathing.  After quite a bit of action and an explosion we learn the man in the suit’s name is Jack.  (Side note: while we learn the names of characters throughout the episode, I’ll be naming them as we get to their scenes and interactions.)

Jack searches for needle and thread and heads off away from the other survivors as things calm down a bit.  Pulling a little bottle of alcohol from his jacket, we see Jack’s got himself a nasty cut along his ribs.  A woman—Kate—stumbles out of the jungle and he asks her for help.  They banter a bit and she helps sew Jack up.  Dare I say a romance could eventually bud between the pair?  We also learn Jack’s a doctor but this seems obvious after he talked to the pregnant lady and saved the woman not breathing.

Kate mentions to Jack that he doesn’t seem afraid and Jack tells her about how he messed up a spinal surgery during his residency and fear crashed into him as he realized his mistake but he decided in that moment to give fear only a few moments before counting to five and fixing the surgery mistake.  How can you not like Jack after this?!  We got ourselves a natural leader.

We are introduced to more characters next as Sayid is building a signal fire and asks Charlie for help.  Charlie writes F-A-T-E on pieces of tape around each of his fingers and Sayid mentions a rescue should have come by then as night falls.  We are also introduced to Boone and Shannon where the former thinks they could be on the island for a while and the latter mentions the plane having a black box and a rescue will arrive at any moment.  Next comes the lovable Hurley who gives food to Claire, who is the pregnant woman.  Finally, we meet Michael and his son Walt, followed by Korean husband and wife, Jin and Sun, with Jin instructing Sun not to interact with the other survivors.

Jack is examining a wounded man whose unconscious and has a gnarly piece of shrapnel in his gut.  Kate mentions that he was sitting next to her in the plane.  Jack talks about the turbulence and blacking out before waking up in the jungle but Kate describes how the plane broke apart in midair.  Jack tells Kate that he’s thinking about going to find the cockpit to find a transceiver.  Kate says she saw smoke deeper into the jungle and a mission is afoot!

As the survivors wait in the dark, a loud, alarming sound comes from within the jungle and yeah, it’s a freaky sound.  Trees are moving and automatically it’s hard not to think of the T-Rex from Jurassic Park.  What’s stranger about the growls though is that it sounds mechanical at times.  (Side note:  There were commercials for the show seeing as it ran on ABC so it definitely takes advantage of stops and starts.)

We get our first flashback (coming out of the commercial break) and it takes place on the plane before the turbulence hits.  Remember, flashbacks are a big part of this show.  Jack is interacting with a flight attendant getting his buzz on with those little bottles of alcohol (he got an extra one from the flight attendant which might have saved his life as he put that one in his jacket pocket and later used it to clean his rib wound).  He gets up from his seat and Charlie moves past him rather quickly while being pursued by the flight attendants.  Jack talks to the woman, Rose, he saved who wasn’t breathing.  Next, the plane goes all shaky shaky.  People fly out of their seats and this flight is going down.

Back on the island the next morning, the survivors are discussing the scary jungle sounds and whatever the “monster” is that was making them.  Jack and Kate are getting ready to leave to find the cockpit but first Kate has to collect shoes from the dead.  She gets a very creepy smile from another survivor who smiles with an orange peel in his mouth (more on him later).

Michael is sitting around with his son Walt joined by Charlie, Shannon, Boone, and Hurley.  The group is talking about random things before Hurley brings up doing something about the bodies of the dead which he hilariously misspells to save young Walt from the horror of the dead.  Jack and Kate show up and mention their mission and ask the others to keep an eye on the wounded while he’s gone.  Charlie mentions his going with Jack and Kate, not wanting to sit about all day (what else is there to do on a beach waiting for rescue?).

Our three heroes head off and Kate recognizes Charlie from somewhere where he reveals his being in a band called Driveshaft, which has a well-known hit.  Jack’s less impressed (he doesn’t strike me as the rock music listening type).

Back on the beach with the others, a downpour occurs and the trees start moving again, announcing the monster is back.

Jack, Kate, and Charlie find the cockpit propped up against the trees during the downpour.  They investigate and find the pilot alive who tells them they were off course and any rescue attempt is looking in the wrong place.  The pilot tries the transceiver but it doesn’t work.  We also learn there were 48 survivors and they’ve been on the island for 16 hours.  Just to call out a point of interest, numbers are a big deal in this show.  They show up often and act as references and connections, which we’ll see more of as we get deeper into the show.  I’ll do my best to call these out when they happen.

The monster arrives, making its strange sounds and in a very gruesome way, the pilot is killed, ripped from the broken windshield as he (stupidly) climbs out to see what the monster is.  Jack, Kate, and Charlie make a run for it (Jack wisely grabs the transceiver) and get separated (a recipe for certain death in any horror movie).  Kate hides in a tree and counts to five before trying to find Jack and Charlie.  She finds Charlie and they see something in a reflection of a puddle after the rains stops.  Jack arrives and says its the pilot and they see the pilot’s bloody body has been left up high in the trees (not Predator style but pretty close).  Gross.  But at least they have a transceiver!

Except it doesn’t work…

End of Part 1.  Onto Part 2!

Jack, Kate, and Charlie are returning to survivor beach, seeming to be in no real rush which is odd considering what they just encountered with the monster killing the pilot.  To each their own, I suppose.  Kate asks what Charlie was doing in the bathroom (I failed to mention this happening previously) while they were in the cockpit and he says he got sick and was a bit of a coward.

Flashback:  In the plane before the crash, Charlie is acting very antsy and not looking all that great, sweating and fidgeting.  He sets off some alarms in the flight attendants and he proceeds to the bathroom where he moves past Jack (remember when we saw that last episode?) and crawls over Shannon and Boone in their seats as well.  Once in the bathroom, Charlie removes his shoe and grabs a baggy of something.  Drugs (good job TSA!).  He gets his fix just as the turbulence strikes.

To the present, Shannon is sunbathing (because why not) and her and Boone argue about helping around the “camp”.  Claire is there and we find out Boone is Shannon’s brother.  Claire mentions she hasn’t felt the baby move since the day before (bummer…).

Jin is fishing for sea urchin (is it still considered fishing if he’s just collecting them from shallow pools?) while Sun watches.  Michael shows up asking if they’ve seen Walt.  Sun speaks in Korean and Jin says something to her and she buttons up the top button of her shirt.  This marriage dynamic is raising a few flags.  Walt is out looking for his dog, Vincent, and finds handcuffs (uh oh! that’s not good!).  Michael finds Walt soon after and we get a good look at their relationship and there’s some contention there between them (the show does a good job of introducing these character relations and providing answers slowly rather than all at once).

Sayid and another survivor—Sawyer—are fighting (fisticuffs in action).  Bad blood  between them is due to Sayid  being blamed for the plane crash by Sawyer because he is of Middle Eastern descent (reminder, the show started shortly after 9/11).  Jack and Kate get in the mix and Michael tells them about the handcuffs and Sawyer accusing Sayid of being the one handcuffed. Jack and Kate tell everyone they found the cockpit and the transceiver omitting the part about the pilot being alive and then killed by the monster.  They ask if anyone can fix the transceiver.  Sayid says he can and Sawyer is quick to question trusting him.  Hurley talks to Sayid away from the group and we learn Sayid was a communications officer with the Iraqi Republican Guard during the Gulf War.

Kate and Sayid talk next and he shares that the transceiver needs to be used on higher ground.  Queue the adventure music as they look to the mountains of the island, knowing a hike is in order.

Kate checks with Jack about the man with shrapnel.  Jack knows time is running out for the man if they don’t get rescued.  She tells Jack that a hiking expedition is going to take place and Jack tells her to run if she hears or sees anything (probably referencing the monster).

We get a brief moment between Jin and Sun and see Jin’s quite the jerk to her.  There’s still a sense of mystery involving them, which we will get answers to soon.  Jin takes prepared sea urchin to Hurley as food.  Hurley refuses leaving us with a comedic moment (Hurley provides a great deal of comedic moments in this show).

Walt is looking through a comic book (looks like a Justice League comic with a polar bear in it) but can’t read it because it’s written in Spanish.  Michael approaches and tries to have a conversation and tells Walt that they can get another dog when they get home and Walt takes off (it’s sore subject).  Jack is searching through some baggage and asks Michael about Walt and we find out that Michael isn’t so sure of Walt’s age at first (interesting…).  Michael mentions the dog and Jack says he saw it in the jungle.

Shannon and Boone get into a fight and Shannon decides she’s going to go on the hike with Sayid and Kate to prove she’s not worthless to the group.  Boone tags along and so do Charlie and Sawyer who we see is reading what looks like a letter of some sorts before joining (more on that later).  Cue the adventure music!

Walt comes across the survivor who smiled at Kate with the orange peal in his mouth (remember him) playing backgammon (somehow that survived the crash).  The man’s name is John Locke and they have a conversation where we learn Walt’s mom died (we also learn that the plane was traveling from Sydney, Australia).  Locke tells Walt about backgammon and how it’s the oldest game in the world.  Locke explains that there are two players and two sides—one light and the dark.  Finally, Locke asks Walt if he wants to know a secret.  This exchange comes off creepy at first but trust me there are no ill intentions here.

In a small moment, Jin continues his offer of urchin to the other survivors and Claire agrees to eat some.  This causes the baby to kick!  Yay!  Jin has a priceless reaction too.

Jack asks Hurley to help him find antibiotics and also lends Jack his help with the man with shrapnel.  We get some more comedic moments with Hurley when Jack pulls the shrapnel out and Hurley passes out.

Back with the hikers, an argument ensues in the jungle and the group is interrupted by a very loud growl.  Is it the monster?  Doesn’t sound the same but something is coming closer to them and at a fast speed.  Everyone runs except Sawyer.  Gunshots sound off and everyone discovers that Sawyer killed a polar bear.  Yep, a polar bear in the jungle.  The shock of the dead bear wears off as Kate asks Sawyer where he got a gun.  Sawyer reveals he took it off a U.S. Marshall.

Sayid thinks Sawyer is the prisoner on the plane and while he’s distracted, Kate takes the gun.  She asks how to unload it and Sayid instructs her.  Kate gives the gun back to Sawyer and he grabs her saying he knows her type—girls just like her.

Flashback:  Kate and the passenger—shrapnel man—sitting next to her are talking but not as friends or even acquaintances (she made it sound like they were strangers to Jack).  Big reveal!  We learn that Kate was handcuffed and shrapnel man is the U.S. Marshall.  Turbulence starts and we see the plane break apart in midair.

The marshall comes to while Jack is working on him, grabs Jack by the collar, and asks “Where is she?”

The hikers finally turn on the transceiver and get a transmission that blocks them from sending anything out.  It’s a recorded message with a strange robotic voice saying “iteration” and then a number followed by a French woman speaking.  Shannon knows some French and translates the message as a distress call saying everyone’s dead, something killed them, and the French woman needs help.  Sayid does the math and estimates the recorded message has been on a loop for 16 years.

Charlie aptly asks, “Guys, where are we?”

End of episode!

Okay, so if you watched the episodes or are familiar with them, there are very memorable moments, which I try to call out in the pics I use.  I’ll be doing this quite a bit because these are also things that become symbols and/or motifs in the show.  Very important as we explore the mysteries of the island.

The mysteries are big.  What’s the monster on the island?  What happened to the French woman?  How has her message been playing for sixteen years?  Then we have the mysteries with the characters.  What’s Kate’s story?  What’s the story behind the contentious relationships between Michael and Walt and Jin and Sun?  Mysteries are important to the show’s appeal and the characters themselves.

Let me know your thoughts and please remember to keep these posts SPOILER FREE.  I’ll remove your post quickly if you let anything slip.  Focus your comments on the episode itself.

Give the Reader 2+2. Not 4

posted in: Storytelling, Writing | 0


I’ve brought up my love for the Coen Brothers and their films a few times on my blog and came across a video on YouTube that made me think a little about storytelling.

The concept of giving the reader/viewer 2+2 and not 4 comes from WALL-E and Finding Dory director, Andrew Stanton.  In a TED Talk, he explains the importance of trusting the audience to be intelligent enough to put things together in order to discover the answer on their own rather than spoon-feeding it to them.  This falls in line with the “show don’t tell” method writers are often encouraged to use.

I constantly come up against this when writing any story.  Sometimes, though, I wonder if I don’t give enough.  What if I’m working this equation: 2+6-4 but leave out one of the components?  Beta Readers obviously help in this because they are pretty good at calling out a missing component but there’s still this lingering question.  My hope is always to give any reader the benefit of the doubt that they will see the answer without me having to spell it out.

There’s also this urge to answer a reader’s question about the plot or a character by providing a clue.  This can definitely be a trap for a writer.  Best to practice and figure out what works best.  I try to take every comment as a grain of salt.

The moral of the post is to give the reader/audience credit for being keen enough to take the components and come to their own conclusions.  Enjoy the video!

Flash Fiction: Blistered Feet on Shattered Steps


A man begging for his life when he truly knows it can be taken from him will say anything.  Truth or lie, his mind will find the way to safety and empty into his mouth until the words flow like sour milk.  Oran Ki’Tanil listened with a cringe as he watched the balding man weep and drool for mercy from the three men standing around him in the empty courtyard.  It was heartless on his part to set the men loose but Oran needed information.  Whatever the cost, he needed it.The men barely noticed him slip out of the shadow he hid in and one was down on the filthy ground unconscious before the other two knew what had happened.  With two of the thicker sticks he kept in the bundle to hide his swords, he struck and whacked the standing men until they were bloodied and down.

The balding man stared wide-eyed unsure what to say or think.  Fear had crippled him, turning his legs to mush.  As he blubbered, Oran returned his fighting sticks into his bundle and grabbed the man, dragging him away from the scene.

“Shut your teeth, Erol.”

“Eh…”  The man stopped his whimpering.  “Ki’Tanil?”  His efforts to be free of Oran’s grip doubled.  “No, no ,no!  Let me go!  Hallowed burn you!”

“He has,” Oran grumbled.  No need to request a second strike.

Finally a few blocks away, Oran threw Erol into a brick wall.  “I saved your life and now you’re going to repay me.”

Erol shook his head, pulling his lips in and keeping them pressed together.  The smell of cheap wine and even cheaper smoke made the unkempt man a step above a beggar.

“You will, Erol, or I’ll deliver you back to those three.  How much did you owe them?”

When Erol would not answer, Oran brought his knee up into the man’s groin.  It would delay the discussion but the fool needed to be aware what Oran was capable and willing to do.

“Speak, you tick!”

“Of what?” Erol said through a weeze as he lay hunched into the wall.

“Queen Erise.  Or whatever else you know about the attack.”

Erol sputtered and spit.  “I’ll never have children now.”

“You’ve got six or did you forget?  Now tell me what rumors I should ignore.”

Erol sniffed and groaned.  “All of them…”  He let out another groan.  “No one knows where she is.  They think her Wielder…that Glasene woman is with her.  If she’s anywhere, she’s probably disguised and attached herself to the collective of nobles meeting outside the city to determine who will challenge the King’s Court.”

Oran doubted the fool’s scenario.  Not even Glasene would chance exposing the queen to throne-thirsty nobles.  He did not doubt the meeting though.  The vipers and rats of Breshtk’s lords and ladies would absolutely move to strike a treaty with the King’s Court.  It was not what he wanted from Erol but it was a path to take.

“Drink and smoke less, Erol,” Oran said, readjusting his bundle, finding steps leading out of the area, and leaving the fool in the dark.

Lost Season 1 Re-watch Schedule

posted in: Film/TV, Review | 1


As I prep to re-watch season 1 of Lost, I want to give a layout of what it will look like.  The first post will cover the two-part pilot and be released on September 12th.  The next three post will cover a single episode allowing us to focus on learning who some of these main characters are and their “back stories”.  From there on each post will cover two episodes until we get to the two-part season finale, which will be separated.  The last post for the re-watch will be on October 27th.

The structure of each post will look much like my Stranger Things Season 1 Re-watch posts last year.  I’ll talk about the characters and plot and call out interesting choices and mysteries about the island.  Don’t get thrown off by the lack of answers to these mysteries.  It’s season 1 and some answers don’t come until later seasons.  (If I succeed, you’ll be chomping at the bit and watching season 2 and onward on your own.)

I’ll also be calling out many references, easter eggs, and connections.  These are the fun things about the show.  If you watched it while it was still airing, there were whole websites devoted to solving the show.

I will do my absolute best not to spoil anything.  I feel that I’m familiar enough with the show to abstain from spilling the secrets of the show.  This means I’ll leave quite a few things vague and also probably play devil’s advocate in a few instances just to be punk.

How you all enjoy the re-watch and my musings.  Lost remains a favorite of mine despite my love for other shows since.  It truly was a phenomenon when it released in 2004.

Finding Harry Potter Late in Life

posted in: Books, Fantasy, Film/TV, Reading | 0

We discover things at various ages in life.  Where I discovered Star Wars at a very young age, someone else of my same age may have discovered it in their twenties or, God forbid, their thirties (what a tragedy!).  However it happens, we experience things differently.  For me, I discovered Harry Potter later in life (my mid-twenties) and even then, my child-like wonder was opened to the magical world as if I were a kid again.

You may ask how this happened.  Let me tell you!  Being a 90s kid, you’d think I would have been exposed to Harry Potter as soon as it was released.  Well, not so.  I was absolutely aware of it but due to my upbringing in a religious home, Harry Potter was viewed equally as Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: The Gathering (I’ll toss in Pokémon too though I’m failing to see why at this moment).  These were all viewed as bad things for my young mind to consume.

Now before you think I had horrible parents, I’m going to come to their defense.  If you grew up in the late 80s through the 90s and were part of any evangelical Christian church, then there was a constant stigma on anything that had to do with magic or witchcraft.  Churches believed these things could lead children and teenagers down paths deemed hazardous for their lives.  My parents agreed with this, believing that certain morals and/or standards could be threatened.  It was the culture of that time and I don’t blame them one bit for exercising that parental check.  Having a son now, you can bet I will be very in tune with what he watches, reads, and listens to.  (Note:  I wasn’t keen enough to argue that Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia were okay.)


Jump back to my mid-twenties and I can’t recall what led me to finally watch the first Harry Potter film but I did and while it was obviously geared towards a younger audience, I was intrigued.  This led me to watch the next films one after another pretty quickly (yeah, I binged them hard).  All of a sudden, I found myself completely mesmerized by this world.  The last film, The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 had not been released yet but I was determined to get more.  This led to my reading the books pretty quickly as well, using any free time I had outside of work and other obligations to finish Harry’s story.

What also helped provoke this wanting to consume this world is my own writing of fantasy.  As an author, I was able to learn from J.K. Rowling’s ability to craft a complex story.  She was able to weave a tapestry of plot and subplots that interconnected in ways the films could not fully weave.  I actually consider my reading of Harry Potter the main contributor to the way I outline and plot my books.  I look for the layers.  Books do not have to be a simple, single layer cake but more like baklava: layers of flavor, texture, and ingredients.

In my mind, the books and films stand up well on their own.  I find that enjoy both for some of the same but also different reasons.  More than a few times now I’ve considered returning to the books.  There is a true magic to how stories can impact our lives.  I actually think Harry Potter is responsible for making many kids in the 90s readers (I see and interact with many of these on social media).  There’s a good reason the books have sold in the millions in worldwide.


While I came to Harry Potter later in life, I find it a great joy of fiction and story to immerse myself into.  My wife and I try to do a full marathon every other year (though I’d be okay with every year) and we look forward to sharing these books with our kids when we deem them old enough to handle the subject matter.

Flash Fiction: Betrayal’s Cost

Reluctance bore itself deep into Barston as he realized the journey to Rastome was almost complete.  Only one other instance of attempted robbery against the merchant train occurred and he had avoided Freilas’ threat only because he had been sent ahead with one of the other hired guards, whose name was Bilkin, to survey the road as they came to a bend notorious for its ambushing opportunities.

For all the chaos Breshtk suffered due to the rumors of Queen Erise’s disappearance, Barston could not help but think he would find a new prosperous opportunity in Rastome.  Surely, there was something that could be gained in one of the larger cities of his home hold.

Freilas screamed at him to get his attention and handed over a large bundle of empty water skins.  “I can hear that brook has turned into quite the stream off the road.  Climb down there and fill these.”  The quiet days on the road left him surly and tasking Barston with extra tasks.

Barston skid down the steep incline, keeping his balance with his hands full.  The water of the unnamed stream was cool against his skin, relieving the heat of the day.  Bugs swirled around his face in the deep shaded area, undeterred by his swatting.

He heard the approach of someone, thinking they came to help but upon turning growled once he saw the blade aimed for his ribs.

Quick hands allowed him to block the strike with the tied water skins.  His eyes kept on the blade but a moment’s look revealed Bilkin was his attacker.  Barston’s feet plunked into the water as he moved to avoid the next strike.  Bilkin bore an angry expression, sweat dripping from his bearded face, and reached for another smaller knife meant to be thrown.  The earlier incident on the road proved his prowess at throwing the double-edged blade.

Bilkin reached back ready to throw and Barston did the only thing he could do.  He grabbed his sword hilt and pulled the blade free.  Bilkin’s eyes widened in shock.  In that brief opening, Barston lunged forward and swung his blade downward.  Bilkin’s chest opened despite steel not touching it.  His shock lingered as he fell back to the ground.

Barston breathed heavily, unable to take his eyes from his broken blade—his Shoal-cursed blade—as steel rose only inches above the hilt.  His eyes searched for others but either Bilkin acted on his volition or was the only one sent to betray him.  Barston let his eyes run over the clean blade of his sword, shattered by the attack that left him alive but his princes dead months ago.

The water skins floated down stream while Barston crossed the water and began his quiet flight from the train up towards Rastome, not caring to confront what may be awaiting him at the train.

 

Fresh Eyes Find Cracks: Importance of Beta Readers

posted in: Books, Editing/Revision, Writing | 0

Comic Con San Diego 2018 has come and gone and I am left deflated… No Stranger Things Season 3 updates.  None at all.  I guess I’ll just be patient and hope the release date announcement doesn’t leave me scrambling to get my re-watch and blog posts done in too much of a hurry.

Until then, I’ll keep my focus on all my other projects.  As you know (I don’t know how you could miss it), I have been getting really good feedback from several beta readers.  From everything to grammar mistakes to needing clarity on characters’ motivations and even geographical confusion, I’m running into lots of great comments and questions.  I already felt like my story was strong but this process just further girds up its loins (lol, girds).

There’s always some sense of uncertainty in the things you create (babies included).  You have doubts to its ability to stand up on its own.  Does it make clear the themes I am exploring?  Are the characters relatable and if not at the beginning, can they grow on the reader over time?  There are other equally important questions I have and hope to get answered.

These fresh eyes of beta readers are not jaded like my own eyes.  I actually prefer to see more “red”, that is comments and errors marked, than not.  As much as I think my book is near perfect after so many revisions and years of working on it, that’s not the truth.  My flawed eyes pass over these mistakes because I’m far too familiar with the writing.  The truth is, I can’t be the only reader before sending it off to an agent and/or publisher.  I’m so glad I’m getting this feedback because I was very close and willing to start querying last year but thankfully, I didn’t rush the process.

I so appreciate the people who have agreed to read my book.  It’s dense and requires dedication.  They will absolutely be getting gift baskets if and when my book does get published (I’ll do that even if it doesn’t to be honest).  So, to my beta readers, I thank you immensely for your help and time.  You give me more confidence in my writing and push me forward.

What’s Coming Up

I feel like I have quite the pile of projects going on and I don’t do myself any favors when I start getting new story ideas.  Even so, I still try to write these ideas down so I can return to them at a later time.  I definitely stay busy with writing and blogging and it helps me to keep all of them on track by providing occasional updates in my blog posts.

I announced a few weeks back that I joined a writing group.  We have had two meet ups so far and both were fun and successful.  I’m already seeing the value in the group and hope it continues for years to come.  I am sharing my book, So Speaks the Gallows, and implementing the group’s suggestions and critique as well as my beta reader comments.  Everything called out seems to be character motivation related, clarity issues, or small gaps in the story.  This is reassuring and makes me believe the story is strong, needing only minor tweaks here and there.  Again, the goal is to query an agent or two sometime this year.  Being July already, I can only hope I meet that goal.

I’m working on the newest Shoals to the Hallowed short story for the upcoming August newsletter and finding it to be an exploration of a genre I’ve not dabbled in before: horror.  I risk bringing this up because those of you subscribed may read it and say, “that was horror?”.  Well, it felt horrific as I wrote it.  Hopefully, it captures the tone and mood I was aiming for.  If I don’t nail that aspect of it, hopefully it was still enjoyable for the reader.

I am also trying to get my website updated.  It’s about time I give it a facelift and hope to have that done soon with the help of my friend who helped me set up the website last year.  If it goes to plan, it should not only look different but be easier to navigate through.  Credit must be given to my wife also because she has an eye for what looks good in a website.  Much of the changes will be coming based on her suggestions.  Be on the lookout for that.

Comic Con San Diego is this weekend so hopefully we get news about Stranger Things Season 3.  Again, I plan on re-watching and devoting a month of blog posts to Season 2 in preparation for the new season.

I hope you’re all staying cool wherever you are.  This summer has been brutal to us desert rats so far.  What I wouldn’t give for a week-long stretch of summer rain right now (minus the humidity).

Sunday Levity: We Built This Schmidt-y

posted in: Film/TV, Sunday Levity | 0


“New Girl” is one of my favorite shows and I was sad to see it end this year.  While I struggle to name a favorite character, I believe the ensemble was one of the best.  It was Zooey Deschanel’s show, but I believe Max Greenfield as Schmidt was the show’s linchpin.  So for today’s Sunday Levity post, here are some great Schmidt moments.  Definitely check out the show for much more.

Forever Re-watchable: The Goonies

posted in: Film/TV, Review | 0

There are those movies you grew up with and then there are those movies that made you grow.  “The Goonies” came out in 1985 which means I did not see it until I was at least seven or eight years old in the early 90s.  My earliest memory of the movie is it scaring the crap out of me.  Thanks, Sloth, for the nightmares.  As I got older, though, I found the movie to have a strong affect on me as a lover of storytelling.

If you are unawares of the plot of “The Goonies,” it follows a group of four friends (Mikey, Mouth, Chunk, and Data) in Astoria, Oregon searching for the pirate treasure of local legend, One-Eyed Willy, to stop the foreclosure of their homes.  Adventure ensues once the Goonies come across a family of criminals who pursue the kids after they learn of the treasure hunt.  Throw in hijinks (that’s a fun word to type) and the theme of friendship strengthened by conflict and you’ve got a quality film that is memorable and has become a cult classic from the 80s.

Mikey is the every man we can all relate to; Mouth is the sarcastic butthead who provides the laughs; Chunk is the chubby kid who is scared of everything but finds courage by the end; and Data is the techy of the group who has an affinity for gadgets that don’t always work but when they do, they prove useful to the group.  None of these characters feel trapped in a box but have depth that is brought out in their actions and dialogue throughout the film.  It’s this friendship that I admire.

Getting our first looks at Sean Astin (Samwise Gamgee!) and Josh Brolin (Thanos!), I always feel like we get introduced to the foundation of things to come for “nerd” culture in cinema.  “The Goonies” is one of the influences for “Stranger Things” and if you’ve been following me for any length of time, you know how much I love that show.  There’s also a Spielberg touch to the film even though it was directed by Richard Donner.  You can’t help but wonder how much Indiana Jones was an influence.  Iconic continues to be a word I come back to.

My appreciation for this film came much later in life especially after I realized it isn’t as scary as first experienced.  Getting past that, I found the humor within the dialogue to be there and quite memorable.  There are physical humorous moments as well (slick shoes!) and these play more to younger audiences (like myself when I first saw the movie).  It’s in the dialogue that I think the film holds up beyond the “children’s appeal”.  It’s a dark film that I think I would hesitate to show my son until I deem him old enough and able to handle the content.  I would not hesitate however to watch it with him and get his thoughts on everything from the sense of mystery/adventure, the scarier elements, and the friendships of the Goonies themselves.  I look forward to this day, in fact.  He may never appreciate it as much as I do, but I can hope, hahaha!

Call to Action:  Seriously, I don’t know how you could not enjoy this film if you grew up in the 80s.  But if you hear the word “goonies” and you wretch, I hope you’ll clean up and check it out again with some friends.  You never know, your tastes may have changed.

Imagination Indoctrination

posted in: Books, Life, Reading | 2

Sometimes you don’t know things about yourself until you encounter a new scenario.  There are the extremes like what would you do when faced with an emergency or crisis and then there are the somewhat moderate instances like what I plan on discussing today.

I have some rather vague memories of children’s books from when I was wee lad.  I don’t remember having children’s books of my own but I do remember my grandparents having several Dr. Seuss books.  My sister and I would “read” these though I think we were drawn more by the pictures than anything else.

My wife and I asked our baby shower guests to bring children’s books for our little boy because we have a strong sense of reading to him even now (with full sarcastic commentary that he won’t appreciate until he’s older).  Our hope and desire is to instill a joy and love for reading from a young age.  This is not going to be a “screens are the devil” post but I am conscious of how much our lives move with screens readily available.  They can’t be escaped unless you’re willing to go off the grid (watch the movie “Captain Fantastic” to get an idea of what this would look like).

Instead, we have a sense for what has proven valuable to our own lives.  While it took me until my high school years to appreciate and become an avid reader, my wife was always in a book from a very young age.  The story seems to be she memorized children’s books before she could actually read the words.  There’s intrinsic value in reading.  Most of all, I believe reading launches the growth and developing of the imagination.  And if there’s anything I want for my son, it’s a wild imagination.

Why is that?  Well, because I attribute my imagination to my self-confidence and joy of life.  Maybe it’s just me (maybe someone else can contribute in the comments) but I can’t even imagine what my life would be like without my imagination.  Ugh, it would be horrible!  I personally think an imagination expands one’s life.  I can’t wait till my son begins to play because I have this vision of him including me in this wide world devised of colors and scenarios that only he can think of.  And I firmly believe reading will be the catalyst to this imaginative wonder.

Call to Action:  Does anyone have any children’s books recommendations?  We have a small assortment right now but are looking to expand.

Flash Fiction: Flakes of Ash

White flakes fell from the sky like wild flies.  Teelee watched and stared, mouth agape.  “Shotra!  It’s snowing!”

“Fool girl,” the Dust Seer grumbled from his sitting position under a leafless tree.  “That’s not snow… There’s no bloody cloud in the sky!”

Teelee realized the truth in his statement but waved her hand in the air to catch one of the floating flakes.  More wordless grumbling came from Shotra the Twig.  He had left her with Apple and their wagon back in the town—she could not remember its name—and returned injured and strange, scaring her as screams came from all around.  So many people were running past her.  Apple almost ran from her but she managed to calm him as they waited.

She thought back to that day—several had passed since then and Shotra’s injury seemed to be worsening.  He refused to see a healer.  She should have been scared but Apple’s cries forced her to tend to the mule.  She could see in his large eyes appreciation for her.

“Aha!”  Her exclamation earned her a rude glare from Shotra but she finally secured a flake in her hand.  Upon looking at it, she realized a grey streak in her palm resulted where she would have preferred the cold nip of a snowflake.  Her eyes jumped to the canvas and dust she read for Master Shotra earlier in the day.  Some of the ash had fallen on the surface.

She brought her hand to her mouth, stifling the gasp.  Her eyes roamed over the changing of what she read.  “Master Shotra,” she whispered.

“Damn girl,” he hissed.  “What?”

“We need to leave this place…”  Yes, it was plain and clear.  The ash flakes gave a stark warning.  “Something is hunting.  Something of the Shoals.”

Shotra stood and limped towards her, favoring his left leg while crossing his arms over his stomach.  His face seemed to have grown paler since the morning.  “Say that again, girl.”  He was often nice to her when she read the dust, which she liked.

She pointed at the canvas.  “It changed with the ash.”

He peered at it.  “I see…  What does it say?”

A single word came to mind; an urgent command from the dust and ash.  “Run,” she said through a deep tremble.

Writing Group Announcement

posted in: Fantasy, Writing | 3

I’ve got a bit of news today that I’m excited to share.  I’m active on Twitter and have been for a while now as I move more and more beyond just a casual writer.  I’ve made contact with other published authors, editors, and agents able to interact with them in both a professional and casual manner.  Getting history book recommendations from or sharing a joke about ketchup preferences with established fantasy writers remains worth bragging about from time to time.

So, the news (the title spoils it to be honest) is that I recently came across a tweet from another writer looking to start a writing group specifically comprised of fantasy writers.  I saw it and replied almost instantly telling him I was interested.  From there, we both tweeted out the writing group inquiry and within a day we had three other writers join us!  So, we are working out the details and figuring out how we are going to do this.

Let me expound a bit on the importance of this.  There’s been this jealousy I’ve had of other writers who have been part of writing groups and make mention of their appreciation for the group in their journey to publishing.  By no means do I consider this a sure thing for getting published (there’s more legwork to do on my part) but I do think it will be invaluable to have four more people read my work and give me advice and suggestions that serve only to improve the story as a whole.

Since I’ve been rewriting the second half of my Ravanguard novella, I think that will be the first of my stories to put through the group’s hands.  I will absolutely be giving casual updates on how the group impacts me too.  Hopefully, it is something that becomes a stable resource for me.  I also look forward to establishing relationships with these other writers who I know will impact me in a positive light.

There’s no Call to Action today but I will say this: God bless every parent who did not throw in the towel when their newborn decided it wanted to be fussy for hours on end.  Our little bundle of drool and grunts has decided he will do as he pleases and me and my wife try to figure out the best ways to get him to sleep (bouncing, rocking, shushing, etc.).  Pray for us, lol.

Summer Days

posted in: Books, Film/TV, Life, Music, Review, Sports | 2

Summer is here in full tilt (poker reference) and beating down us weirdo’s who choose to live in the Mojave Desert.  Triple digit temperatures just about every day make you long for the mountains or beach.  While we endure it though, we’re having fun, remaining cool by whatever means necessary.

I don’t talk about it much, but I have been fully invested in baseball this year.  I am a San Francisco Giants fan (I admit, I am a newer fan thanks to my brother-in-law and have slid head first into the fandom—pun!).  As most people will say, they don’t like watching baseball games on tv because it’s boring.  I am the exact opposite.  I love watching the games whenever I have the opportunity.  I find it relaxing and a great thing to listen to in the background if I’ve got other things to do.  I’ve been quite prone (much to the chagrin of my wife) to listening to the radio feed while doing dishes and preparing dinner most nights, hahaha!  I’ve pretty much abandoned my childhood love of basketball for baseball.

I am reading a few books, finding quite a few non-fiction ones that I’ve enjoyed.  I don’t know if I’ll include these in my next newsletter but if I do, I’ll go a bit deeper in a full review.  Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel is renown and award winning and not at all a difficult read.  It explores civilization and its evolution from very grounded foundations.  I’m always intrigued by history and how we’ve got to where we are.  Another book I recently finished is The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien, which serves as a memoir from his time in the Vietnam War.  It explores men he served with and their struggles both during and after the war.  I appreciate the vulnerability offered, letting the human side of these men be remembered.

Like sports, I don’t talk much about music but I’ve been stuck on a few albums as of late.  As I’ve mentioned before, I don’t know how to really review music.  My tastes are what they are.  I can listen to hardcore melodies and screams of bands like Alexisonfire and Dance Gavin Dance while at the same time throw on some Tracy Chapman.  For lighter listening, The Paper Kites album, “twelvefour”, is beautiful and soothing.  I need to get it on vinyl.  It’s just one my favorites right now.  For a little “harder” sound, I recently found a band called Hands Like Houses.  No screaming but they are similar to the Hardcore Alternative styles that I enjoy.  Let’s just say I showed them to my wife and she liked what she heard (she’s not a fan of the screaming types, lol).

Our tv viewing has been mostly comprised of Chuck now that it’s on Amazon Prime.  When I find the time though, I am trying to get through season two of Westworld and plan on getting into season two of Legion after that.  Still waiting on Stranger Things Season 3 news.  I bet we’ll see a trailer at Comic-Con San Diego in a few weeks.  I’ll announce my plans for Stranger Things Month here on my blog when I get that info.

Okay, movies.  I’ve got two I recommend if you just need to laugh.  “Game Night” you can rent and “Tag” you can go see in a nice air conditioned theater right now.  Both are hilarious.  We laughed a lot.  “Game Night” was a pleasant surprise, surpassing my low expectations.  “Tag” was just fun.  Great characters who had great chemistry carry out a tradition that promotes friendship.  You’ll laugh a lot with these two so make sure you watch them with friends and family (neither are for little kids so get a babysitter).

Call to Action:  Anyone have any big plans for the summer?  Trips?  Concerts?  Having a newborn, we don’t have much planned beyond getting extra sleep on the weekends but once our son gets a little older, we are gonna hit that open road!

Always Be Learning

posted in: Books, Film/TV, Reading, Writing | 0

When you start out as a writer looking for any and everything that could give you guidance and help, one thing you consistently see is, “Read, read, and read more”.  This can be bothersome for some or at least it was for me because I wanted to respond, “But I want to write…”.  What should be added to that direction is:  Read, read, and read more because you will learn how to write.

Cognitive absorption (I have no idea if this is an accurate term or even used properly but I like the sound of it and it’s my blog so…yeah) through reading is how I like to think about my ability to read different kinds of books be it fiction, nonfiction, biography, etc. and subconsciously collect sentence structure, characterization, inclusion of theme, setting tone, and several other important literary practices.

I always want to be learning.  Whether by reading, listening, or being observant of the world around me, I cannot be the best storyteller I can be if I already think I know what I need to know.  To this day, I find myself stashing away nuggets of info I come across.  I’ll notice descriptions in a book about a people, places, or things and think, “That’s really good. I need to remember that detail or method”.  I’ll be listening to a podcast and a topic will weave between two speakers and I’ll pick up on conversational threads that I think can be implemented between my own characters as they talk to one another.  I’ll see something in a show or movie and make a note of the shape, color, and/or texture.

The notion of always learning can seem daunting and might make you feel overwhelmed.  Learning doesn’t have to be reading historical tomes of 1500 pages one after another.  Find a subject and explore it by whatever means.  Books are not the only option.  Podcasts, articles, and documentaries are all great mediums to absorb whatever it is you’re interested in.  There is no test at the end, so go your own speed and remember you learn what you want to learn about once you’re out of school.  Focus on those and you’ll enjoy it far more than when you were cramming for a test the night before.

Call to Action:  I want to encourage two sources that I love learning from.  The first is Joe Rogan’s podcast, “The Joe Rogan Experience”.  He talks with all sorts of people about all kinds of subjects from entertainment to deeper philosophical issues.  The second are the shows “No Reservations” and “Parts Unknown” by the late Anthony Bourdain.  The passing of Bourdain last week came unexpected and is tragic.  His traveling shows have been consistent staples for me because I always learn and find his approach to people through food a rare art.

To Write is Right

I had no idea what my writing time would look like with a newborn.  It definitely takes adjusting to but there are pockets to be found (sometimes it’s less than you hope for and sometimes you look at the clock and think, “dang… I need to go to bed”).  So as I’ve adjusted and made sure my son doesn’t go neglected, I’ve been breaking up my writing time but getting things done.

Obviously, the blog gets time (otherwise you wouldn’t be reading this).  I don’t plan as far ahead as I’ve done in the past, leaving me to write a few days ahead of the schedule so I can edit and revise accordingly.  It makes for a more “on the fly” approach.  When I first started, it was easier to plan ahead because I had several topics I wanted to write about.  For this season though, I am more in the “what’s happening now” mode.  We’ll see how this goes as the months progress.  With Stranger Things Season 3 on the horizon, I will absolutely need to plan ahead.  I might even get a jump on those posts this summer seeing as how they took quite a bit of preparation to write along with re-watching season 1.  (I just checked and there’s no official release date for season 3 so I may have quite a few months to prepare.)

My book, So Speaks the Gallows, is currently being beta read.  I’m being patient, leaving me to spend time on a few other projects.  One of which is the Glossary I have for my Ravanguard series.  It’s extensive (that word might be an understatement) and has gone through so many revisions of its own over the last ten years.  Every place, group, and character is captured with details important to me as the writer so I can go back and reference the eye or hair color of a character.  To be honest, I’ve even considered going entry by entry and making sure every mention in the book is consistent.  Is that too much you might ask but one of my biggest concerns when writing such a large book is that there will be glaring inconsistencies that should have been caught beforehand (you’d expect as much with so long to write and polish the book).  I don’t know…  It’s a tough one to add to my already “thick” to do list for the book but I want and feel the need to get it as perfect as I can.

In addition to this, I am also revising the first novella of the Ravanguard series, Dim the Veil.  It is currently too long by novella word count standards.  To be brutally honest though, I’m not happy with the second half of the story.  I read it now and it feels…forced.  I wanted to implement some things that I thought I could make work but I continue to feel the story doesn’t fit.  Rather, it lacks what So Speaks the Gallows has embodied and consistency should be found not only in a single story but from story to story in a series.  This is why I’m going back through and giving it a proper scrub and tuck.

As you can see, I’m busy with plenty of things on the writing table.  Throw in my day job and my family and I am doing my best to balance everything.  My respect goes out to all those who do this well.  Again, I am astounded by my wife who does so much each and every day.  She’s amazing and I cannot imagine being a parent without her.  Truly, she is a rock and nearly perfect partner.  Watching her with our son brings me great joy.

No call to action today.  I don’t have anything to be honest and I’d rather not force something unless there’s one to offer.  Look out for my next blog post on the 9th.  It will be another “Forever Re-watchable” post.  Here’s a hint: “I said good morning, Gill.”

Flash Fiction: An Odd Thing

She pressed her finger and thumb together, squeezing the blood between each, before separating the connection.  The sticky stretch of wet redness between each finger mesmerized her in a way that shouldn’t.  Not unless she was a child.  Perhaps, her mind fell back into the days before she fought for coin.  Back before the men and women in her life found her suitable to abuse and belittle for their own enjoyment and profit.

Was it her blood or that of the bald-headed, bearded man she killed earlier?  Who could say?  It looked the same no matter the owner.

“You shivering bastards…”  A man staggered by, catching sight of her as she pressed her back against a low stone wall.  The cool air of the early morning made both of their breaths misty.

Chasiel bit back the cooing sound in her throat, ready, and surprising the ugly fool who belonged to her rival mercenaries, the Silver Way.  He stepped in, short sword raised and ready to hack at her, but Chasiel’s instinct and will to live could not be undone even by her childish lapse.  Her dagger blade sliced open the man’s thigh.  He screamed but could barely get the sound out before she twisted the blade upward into his throat.  More blood.

She fell back to the cold, hard ground as the man toppled over, shaking slightly as life slipped away.  Her body ached in pain.  Her cuts and the stab wound to her lower back were beginning to burn.  She could see her reflection in the fresh pool of blood now.  How could it reflect like a mirror?  Truly, it was a considerable quality to reflect back the reflection of the one who killed its master.

A voice came in the distance of the manor’s grounds.  Fenroe.  He lived.  Chasiel let the coo finally slip from her grasp of it in her throat.  The Silver Way set the trap for them.  Somehow, they knew of Chasiel’s attempt at taking their contract.  Crisp was dead and she saw her captain, Feller Crowne, take an arrow in the chest.  Maybe he lived.  Maybe he didn’t.  Others fell as well.  How many of their numbers remained?

An odd thing blood was to be so important for life, she thought.  Yet in death, it was trivial.  Lose some and you live.  Lose too much and you die.  There she was again, mesmerized by the red fluid.  She preferred the days before she saw so much blood.  Days of seeking food and shelter only.  There was no need for blood back then.

“Chas?”

Fenroe again.  She let the cooing sound come from her lips and heard him curse, hurrying towards her across the yard, likely searching behind the structures and stalls of the wealthy merchant.  Chasiel wanted to sleep.  Her eyes grew heavy.  She did not think she lost too much of her own blood.  Not yet at least.  Such an odd thing, though, for her life to be leaking slowly.

Sunday Levity: Deadpool Edition-ioso

posted in: Comics, Film/TV, Sunday Levity | 0

So I know Deadpool is not everyone’s cup-o-tea.  He’s vulgar, violent, and childish in every sense of the word.  However, his zaniness is a breath of fresh air (figuratively speaking) in light of so many “serious” super hero films.

I wanted to share some of his better qualities (and tame ones) today.

I couldn’t agree more… I love pancakes.

“I’m invincible!”

Deadpool’s interactions with other Marvel heroes and villains are sometimes spot on as he makes keen observations.

If you’ve watched the movies, you know about Deadpool’s love/hate for Wolverine. It goes deeper in the comics.

Classic.

Call to Action: While I’ve used this post for levity, I do want to express my gratitude for the men and women who have given their lives for our nation. There is no greater sacrifice and whatever your affiliations, we should honor and respect those who have given everything to preserve our rights and freedoms.

Marvelous

posted in: Comics, Film/TV, Storytelling | 0

When you’re a late 80s/whole 90s kid, you are very much shaped by what movies, cartoons, music, video games, and even toys were popular during those years.  I have an affinity for Ninja Turtles, G.I. Joe, Transformers, The Goonies, Indiana Jones, Nintendo, and comics.  This latter one is what I want to talk a bit about today.

With all the Marvel films and shows coming out every year (mainly the MCU and Netflix shows), I wanted to talk a bit about how I’m more of a fan of Marvel Comics than DC Comics.  Honestly, it comes from the FOX Kids X-Men animated series that ran from 1992 thru 1997.  I loved this show growing up and watched it every Saturday morning (it has quite the kick ass theme music by the way).  Much of my education about the characters and world created by Stan Lee and others came from this habitual watching experience.  This extended into comics and while I was busy spending my allowance on basketball cards rather than comics, I did buy a few (there were only a few I was allowed to buy and it depended on the level of weird and violence depicted on the cover; parenting 101 won out every time back then).

As I got older though, I read and got into other marvel characters like Spider-Man, Darkhawk (there’s a deep cut), and the Fantastic Four.  X-Men continued to be my first love though and while I’m lukewarm on most of the movies (Days of Future Past still remains my favorite), I have dived deeper into the world and mythology over the years even as an adult.  X-Force and X-Factor were extensions that introduced more great characters like Deadpool and Cable (I’ve seen Deadpool 2 twice now! So good!).  For whatever the reason, I loved this imagining of heroes and villains differentiated between abilities they were born with.  As a kid, I had no idea mutants were a parallel allusion to civil rights born back in the 60s.  To a kid, they are colorful customers with superpowers.  That’s all you need!

All I know is we love what we love.  Nowadays, there’s no shame in being a nerd and comic fanboy.  For that, I am grateful.  Who knew that in 2018, you could get away with wearing a Marvel-themed t-shirt and not be ostracized.  Even in grade school, I don’t think I ever wore a comic book-related t-shirt (nor did I own any to be honest).

This is not to say I hate DC Comics and it’s brand of characters.  In fact, I’ve always loved Batman.  Whether it’s Tim Burton’s “Batman” or the “Batman: Animated Series”, I’ve always thought Batman was one of the better super heroes out there.  As I’ve gotten older, the complexity of the character and his inner demons make him even more captivating to me (you all know I’m a sucker for a conflicted character).

I’m excited to see where the future goes with all these Marvel properties, though.  So far, I can honestly say I’ve enjoyed many of the recent adaptations.  Go back and check out some of my reviews to get more in depth looks.  It really is refreshing to see the care to detail the film industry puts towards these characters I grew up with and devoted a great deal of time and money towards.

Call to Action:  If you have a chance, find interviews of Stan Lee (there are several on YouTube) and listen to the pride and joy he has in his creations.  It’s amazing the success he had on writing and drawing masked and costumed characters.

Missing Sleep

posted in: Life | 1

When I think of sleep and how I miss it, I hear Queen’s “You’re My Best Friend” in my head.  No, I was not disillusioned enough to think I would still sleep after having a baby.  I’m dim when it comes to some things but not that.  By the way, mad kudos to my wife because she’s been super gracious to me, allowing me to sleep during week nights when I have to get up early for work.  That’s not to say I told her to wake me up if she needs help with our little man while she feeds him every two hours.  She’s amazing.  I don’t know how she does it.  There truly is a magical power when it comes to mothers and their ability to care for their babies.  It’s a beautiful thing and has been a great delight of mine to witness.

I admit, I am writing this blog post the day of.  Usually, I’m ahead by a few days so I can tweak and edit my post before releasing it.  Today, though, it’s different.  We had a long weekend and I didn’t feel like writing on any of my days off.  So there.

It was a great weekend though.  My sister and brother-in-law were in town and they got to meet their nephew.  I saw Deadpool 2, which is not for everyone (seriously, if you saw the first one on purpose or by accident, the sequel drives the violence and vulgarity to 11).  We watched the series finale of one our favorite shows, New Girl, not knowing it was the finale until the very end.  I’m still coping with that too…  I love that show.  I might have to do a tribute post to honor it.  Overall, a great weekend.

Other than that, I’ve been getting some feedback from my beta readers and that’s been encouraging.  Looks like minor fixes so far.  Really looking forward to getting all the comments.  There’s a level of anticipation I am keeping tight reins on at the moment.  I don’t have a bevy of patience so it’s all about keeping myself occupied with other things.  I am revising the first novella of the Ravanguard series to keep my skills sharp.  I think I’ll provide more info on that and my process later this week or the following week.  So keep an eye out.

Hope you all had a great weekend and were able to rest and spend time with friends or family.

Call to Action: Where are all my yanny people at?! (If you don’t know what I’m talking about, look up “yanny vs laurel”.)  Apparently, what you hear has to do with frequencies.  It’s science.

Avengers: Infinity War (Part I) Review w/ SPOILERS

posted in: Film/TV, Review, Writing | 1

This is your first and only warning that the following post contains SPOILERS for the latest MCU film, “Avengers: Infinity War (Part I)”.  If you haven’t seen it yet, run away!  Actually, go and see it and return.  That’s it.  Now let’s continue.I feel the need to point this out from the start because I’ve heard too many people make a minor complaint after seeing the movie.  This is part one of two.  Of course it ended the way it did!  There’s more coming next May.  Rest assured, you didn’t just watch half of your favorite heroes “mist” away forever (hint: just check Marvel’s film forecast for the next couple of years).

Rather than writing a long-winded re-cap and critique of the film, I want to focus on what made this film of great magnitude work in a somewhat up and down film franchise.  Not all MCU entries have been pristine (let’s be honest with ourselves).  For every “Captain America: Winter Soldier” (2016) or “Black Panther” (2018), there is a “Thor: Dark World” (2013) or “Iron Man 2” (2010).  Some are very good and some seem to have missed the mark wide left.  Many times (in my opinion; that’s all it is) the downfall or lacking element of these weaker films is the villain.  Go back to my post last year about antagonists to see what I look for in a believable and compelling villain:  http://adamhenderson.net/2017/02/08/vilest-villainy-vowed-to-venture/

“Avengers: Infinty War” is about Thanos.  Plain and simple.  It’s not about our huge lineup of heroes.  They are secondary.  What “A:IW” did and quite well was establish a villain we first got wind of in the post credit scene of the first “Avengers” (2012) film.  That means we’ve had six years of anticipation and minor mentions in the films leading up to the big showdown.

Who is Thanos?  We need to know this in order to feel the full weight of the character.  What drives this galactic entity to attack Earth?  Well we don’t really know until we step into this film, which starts with Thanos and his Black Order after they’ve attacked and killed half the people on Thor’s ship after the events of “Thor: Ragnarok” (2017).  We learn that Thanos has a tragic past, seeing over population destroy his home world of Titan.  From that, he has sought to bring balance to the universe by going from planet to planet, wiping out half of populations to establish peace.  This is his goal and if that was all it was, then I would say we are dealing with another one dimensional villain bent on destruction.

Nay nay!

Thankfully, this is not all there is to him.  In order to accomplish his goals of ushering in the same balance and peace to Earth, Thanos has to fight Earth’s mightiest warriors.  Iron Man, Captain America, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, Black Panther, and so many of the heroes we’ve been introduced to and following since the first “Iron Man” (2008) film band together and take on Thanos, his Black Order, and lesser minions.  Thanos has faced defeat already and he knows he needs more to combat Earth’s heroes.  Enter the ultimate McGuffins of the MCU: the infinity stones.

To wield all the stones (space, time, reality, mind, soul, and power) and become truly invincible, he needs something to contain and harness each power.  That containment cannot be accomplished unless it be forged from a dying star, much like Thor’s hammer.  Hence, the Infinity Gauntlet was made and Thanos is able to place each collected stone in the gauntlet.  The film follows his collecting said stones and every time he manages to add one to the gauntlet, we feel the impending doom, hoping he fails.

Alas, he does not fail.  Thanos collects every stone but there is a cost and this is where the film convinced me and made me proud as a storyteller.  While most of the stones seem to be “easy” for him to gain, one in particular is not.  The soul stone has been elusive and hidden from everyone (even from us in the audience because there have been no clues as to its whereabouts).  One person does know however of its location and that would be Thanos’ adopted daughter, Gamora, who we were introduced to in “Guardians of the Galaxy” (2014).  Sent on a mission by Thanos to locate it, Gamora knows where it is and is forcibly persuaded to tell him the location.

Once there, Thanos learns he must trade a soul for a soul.  In the most poignant, humanizing scene I could have hoped for, Thanos tragically sacrifices the life of Gamora for the soul stone.  My heart twisted as I watched the pain and tears in Thanos as he did so.  There it is.  There is the moment I didn’t even know I wanted.  Give me an antagonist I can sympathize with and you’ve given me a character with depth.  Thanos pays the ultimate price and even confesses at the film’s ending that in order to accomplish his goal, it cost him everything, revealing that his love for Gamora was real.

So, yes.  Our heroes not only failed (another important part of this story because we need to see heroes fail in order to be reminded that they are not invincible) but they are greatly weakened and diminished as we see Thanos destroy half of the universe’s population with a snap (literally).  Remember, this is part one.  Part two should bring everything back around and I think I can most assuredly postulate that we will see the atrocity of Thanos’ actions against the universe be righted or at least partially restored.

In conclusion, “Avengers: Infinity War (Part I)” is about Thanos and his main conflict.  His rise and fall moves the story forward and we are treated to a villain I actually found myself liking as much as I liked the Joker in Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight”.  For different reasons, of course, but it’s all the same.  Give me an antagonist who is more than a surface-level psycho and I will be engrossed in the complexity of their conflict and goal.

Call to Action:  Seriously, I shouldn’t have to say go see it but if you did and didn’t notice this aspect of Thanos, I encourage you to go see it again.  Do not think of it as a movie about our heroes but about the tragic character that is bent on bringing balance to the universe, unaware that to do so will cost him everything.

Sweet Summer Heat

posted in: Film/TV, Life | 0

As I’ve stated before, I live in the Mojave Desert in Southern California where the sweltering temperatures of summer unapologetically push the thermometer up into triple digits.  We can usually expect seeing 99 hit 100 and beyond before midday.  If you are unaccustomed to this daily punishment, then I envy your gift of comfort.

You might ask, “Why not just invest in air conditioning?”  Well, you see, my friend, that is not always financially feasible.  And when you live in an apartment, the landlord doesn’t quite care if his or her tenants are comfortable.  We have swamp coolers for the cheaper option and while they work so long as humidity is absent (dry heat my left foot!), we often find ourselves in single layers, sipping ice water, and dreaming of rain.

One saving grace is the movie theater (yep, we got one of those!).  With the influx of summer blockbusters coming every Friday starting two weeks ago (Avengers: Infinity War post is coming soon), my wife and I hope to find ourselves in those old cushioned seats basking in air conditioning we don’t have to pay for.  But what about the baby you might ask?!  No worries.  He has grandparents that are more than willing to watch him for a couple of hours and allow mom and dad some alone time with strangers.

All this is to say you should expect some posts about said blockbusters throughout the summer.  Avengers, Solo: A Star Wars Story, Deadpool 2, Ocean’s 8, Incredibles 2, Ant-Man and the Wasp, and probably some others to name a few.  Should be a fun summer despite our feeble attempts at trying to keep our apartment cool.  Also, whoever said drinking hot coffee in the heat helps “cool” your body deserves a pox on their soulless body!  For me, I’ll stick with ice-cold beer.  Cheers!

Call to Action:  Throw out some films you’re looking forward to this summer.  Doesn’t have to be a blockbuster.  I’m a huge fan of indie films as well.

Coming-of-Age Thoughts/Lady Bird Review

posted in: Film/TV, Review, Storytelling | 2

There are certain stories I’m drawn to (more so in movies than books in this instance) where a young person’s journey from adolescence into adulthood is magnified.  They be best described as “coming-of-age” stories.  Usually in these films, we get a glimpse into a select moment and are shown who this young person is, what they desire, what they fear, etc.  These have a way of grasping my full attention for reasons I’ll explain if you so choose to keep reading.

The most recent experience I had was with the film “Lady Bird”, directed by Greta Gerwig and starring Saoirse Ronan.  The film takes place in Sacramento, CA in 2002.  Normally, I relate more to coming-of-age stories of boys (see “The Way Way Back” and “Boyhood”) but I found myself enjoying watching this young woman going through her senior in high school and preparing to go to college.  Mainly, my enjoyment has to with the fact that I was a senior in high school in 2002-03 in southern California (not Los Angeles) also.  Much of her struggles with school, classmates, and parents felt very visceral to me all the while the war in Iraq had just started and was often playing in the background of settings.  I remember those days so clearly.

Suffice to say “Lady Bird” gripped me instantly and since it was on my “Movies of 2017 to Watch” list, I was able to look past the immaturity of the main character and pick out subtle things I loved.  Most of those were references to the time and culture but they were enough to keep me engaged.  I don’t know if I’d recommend the movie to be honest.  It was okay but not grand (it absolutely reeked of whatever it is the Academy Award’s consider award-worthy).  I think 2016’s “The Edge of Seventeen” was far-superior film and much funnier (also having a female lead).

I don’t know why these kinds of films draw me in.  I don’t consider my own “coming-of-age” experience to be all that impressive.  I went to high school, graduated, went to college, delayed graduation by slacking and feeling uninspired, and then met my wife, finished my degree, established a career, and now have a baby.  It’s all very simple yet fulfilling.  These films however have much better highlights that involve conquering fears or making decisions not to be part of the status quo.  Then again, a film of my life would not attract much of an audience so I understand and appreciate the screenwriters who add drama and tension in order to push the main character a little closer to adulthood.

I think that’s the reason I am drawn to these kinds of films.  I enjoy watching the maturation of an individual especially when they realize adolescence is such a small part of life and the horrors of high school fade quickly.  Experiencing life is sweeter when stepping out from the social constructs of narrow expectation.

Call to Action: I threw out the names of a few coming-of-age films I like but I also recommend these as well:  Stand By Me, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, The Kings of Summer, and my favorite of all time:  The Breakfast Club.

Flash Fiction: A Legend’s Call

Kesree’s cottage slept as Damrin approached on foot, thankful to finally feel his feet and legs strong and not aching after a day of walking.  To the west, the great cliffs, the Brutes, split by the waterfall called the Silent Mother’s Tears roared.  Snowfall had been generous in recent months for the stream to be so high while he crossed over the foot bridge built by Kesree himself.

Inside the cottage there was nothing.  Hints of Kesree remained.  Touches of his brilliance when it came to his ability to trap the power of his Shoal, Temzda, and contain its affect on things both living and not.  Damrin did not mean to begin rummaging so freely and disrespectfully but in minutes, the floor and every other surface was soiled by his angered search.  Books and papers rained while writing apparatus spilled and stained.

The Shoalway opened outside and Damrin had little time to react, reaching but not touching Qorum.  At the window, he looked out to find an armor wearing Wielder just as their Shoalway closed, swirl of glass forever left on the ground.  Damrin recognized but did know the gray-haired man whose hatchet nose hooked down and beard was cut into a sharp square.

“Come out, Damrin Graeves,” the older man called.

Unblinking, dumb-founded like a small boy seeing a Wielder for the first time, Damrin stopped in the doorway until waved forward by the legend that is Barat Bladeveil.  “Sir?”

Bladeveil, the living legend among all the Holds, did not smile, jaw set in the most-earnest of manners.  He was the last living Shoal Sword, the knights of old—long gone from the world.  “Set aside whatever allegiances clasp your wrist.  Our oaths bind more than the feeble war tantrums made by the Hold Kings currently engaged in.  Our duty is to this world, to protect those who face threats they cannot hope to counter.”

The speech was delivered in such a way that Damrin found himself on his knees before the hero of old, forgetting why and what he came for in Kesree’s refuge.  “You want me?” he asked.

Crouching with ease, body not touched by time’s sting, Bladeveil reached out and touched Damrin’s shoulder.  “A Shoalway breach took place days ago and I need your help.  I know you by your reputation.”  His gray eyes looked past him at Kesree’s cottage.  “Kesree confided in me not two months ago.  You, he said, were one who could aid in dire times.”

The swell of pride in the words and request took the slightest cut as the threat registered in Damrin’s mind.  A breach?  If true, and he had no reason to question Barat Bladeveil, then his fury at Kesree did indeed not matter.  This war between the Holds grew small in his mind.  He had a duty to the Holds and he was going to stand alongside Barat Bladeveil, the last of the Shoal Swords, to see it through.

Flash Fiction: A Morning for Mourning

After long days of rituals leading to her choosing a husband, Hijeneva awoke to the screams, mistaking them at first to be the ceremonial raised voices of the women of the Ajjuun.  She stirred herself, rubbing sleep from her eyes, unsure of the hour.  In two days she was expected to put her suitors through the trials.  The items taken from the dead god were ready to be tested and she was ready to see the truth behind each.

The screams told her something horrible was taking place in the witching hour.  The soft gray glow of the sky from her maiden hut window suggested the sun was less than an hour from waking the rest of the world.  She pushed herself up from her sleeping mat, dressed, and grabbed her shield and spear.  She considered the god’s items for a moment.  Should she risk it?  Perhaps it was an attack by the Shygua.  If so, her people needed help.  Due to the dead god, the Ajjuun had lost too many of their young warriors.  No, she resisted the urge, fearing the unknown could kill her just by touching the items.  More screams pulled her to the early dawn.  Outside, she found chaos.

Running past her drowsy vision and fighting in the shadows, the Ajjuun were in disarray.  Hijeneva stepped forward but stopped when her foot fell further than she expected.  She crouched, hand touching the print.  Three toes she counted but something else—a swishing mark, suggesting a heavy tail—stamped the earth with a weight suggesting great size.  What could have made the print?

Out of the corner of her eye, Hijeneva reacted in time but still bore the brunt of the strike.  Something heavy clipped her shoulder but found its full impact in her hut’s wall.  Pain broke her fall as she slid against the earth.  Her shield twisted her fingers, breaking at least two.  Her spear was gone.

Something moved in closer from where the flung object struck her.  Frantic and in pain, she moved her shield to her other hand, ready to defend.  Her dazed eyes caught the outline of a gray, slick form with too many eyes to be real.  A sound she thought was high-pitched, sinister laughter interrupted her pounding ears.  Nearby torchlight touched the blade of a tiil inches away from her.

The creature advanced, revealing two legs of three clawed toes and a balancing tail at its rear.  Hijeneva rolled, threw her shield like an over-sized bowl, and took up the tiil, recognizing its distinct quality and stabbed greedily at the flesh of her attacker as it swayed in recovery from her shield striking it.  Her screams of pain and anger ripped through the new day in what would surely be a morning for mourning.

What to Write?

I’ve been watching the writing business from afar for a few months now (like fifteen+ months if I’m being honest) and I’ve been keeping close eye on the fantasy genre.  Mostly, I do this because I’m curious as to what is coming out.  I’m especially curious about the kind of fantasy getting published.

I guess the risk in this is being influenced to touch a specific kind of fantasy or subgenre just to be relevant or “buy worthy”.  I never wanted to do this as I grew as a writer but anytime you write a genre, some of those traditional or cliche elements bleed through.  It happens and there’s balance that I have to find.

For myself, I love the genre but have always followed the advice, “Write what you want to read,” first.  I admit wanting to explore other genres but I find myself encouraged and excited to hit the keyboard every day.  If nothing else, I think I need to keep on that path.

Little side note, I was working on my book yesterday and finally put in some much-needed fixes for my magic system.  For nine years I have sort of known about this problem and overlooked it.  Not because I just waved it away but because I trusted the solution would present itself.  I didn’t know it would be so many years but it finally came.  There’s a long exhale that comes when something glaring in the whole story finally gets fixed by your own hand and not by someone you’re trying to impress, hahaha!

Things are sharpening and shapening up.  A few more things on my list to do.  It’s a marathon that I plan to finish.  I’m a bit slower than I hoped but I hold steady.

Call to Action:  Whoa dang… we are a week and a half away from baby time.  I’m asking for prayers and encouragement for patience these last few days.  Go ahead and include my wife in there too.  She’s ready for this baby boy to be out!

Life’s Subtle Snaps

We are two weeks away from the due date for our baby boy to join us.  The wait has been both fast and slow depending on the day.  My wife and I are anxiously being patient.  I feel like bragging on my wife a bit (I enjoy doing so whenever I can).  She has been amazing throughout the whole pregnancy.  Not only has she not experienced any morning sickness and barely any nausea (I keep my hard-boiled eggs far from her, hahaha!), but she has maintained a continuous healthy lifestyle throughout.  I have not made any midnight runs to Taco Bell or Baskin Robbins (honestly, if you know her, it would be the end of the world for her to even have the slightest bit of temptation for these things).  Besides her being too hot at night and eating all of our almonds and cashews, there have been no problems.  She’s been amazing in every way.

We think we’re as prepared as we can be all things considered.  The nursery is mostly put together and I still need to assemble the bassinet and install the car seat in the car, but we’re getting close to the finish line.  Life is good and this new season for us is strictly reserved for devoting ourselves to being the best parents we can be.  Everything else is taking a bit of a backseat on the priority list.

Even in this though, I need to maintain sanity and peace.  I find these best in doing the things I love.  Books, movies, and music remain my points of solidarity.  Writing is in there too but you all know that.

I’m currently reading a few books that may or may not end up on my April Newsletter (sign up if you haven’t yet).  Included in this list is Nicolas Eames’s Kings of the Wyld, which is a fantasy book I can only describe as part grimdark and part humor.  Eames does some interesting things with the genre and my lack of details should tell you it will more than likely be reviewed in full in my newsletter.  Other than that, I’ve gone through a few audiobooks that were okay but nothing that blew my hair back.  I do have an audiobook that I am extremely excited about called Cardboard Gods and deals with the author’s telling his story through his collection of baseball cards.  If you don’t remember, I have been collecting sports cards most of my life and I have a great desire to listen to his story.

For movies, I’ve still been trying to watch several films from 2017 that have gotten a lot of attention during the awards season.  I haven’t seen very many that I thought lived up to the acclaim.  One I did recently watch though that I thought was an amazing film was Wind River.  It is not an easy film to watch and recommend you be aware that the content is for adults.  The acting is superb by all the actors and the cinematography is exquisite.  If you like crime drama/thrillers, I highly recommend it.  Other than that, my wife and I have been revisiting movies from our youth.  Steven Spielberg’s Hook brought us back to childhood bliss and we quoted the movie, recalling how much Robin Williams was a master at what he did best: bringing joy and laughter wherever he went.

When it comes to music, I am all over the place.  Sometimes, I get pulled into a particular genre or artist and do not stop listening for weeks.  Recently, I’ve been glued to Haim’s “Something to Tell You” album as well as anything X Ambassadors puts out (I am counting down the days until their new album “Joyful” is released).  I can never pin down what in music captures my heart.  Believe it or not, I don’t think I could ever review a song or album, which I’ll simply explain is due to my lack of music theory understanding.  I like what I like.

Other than all this, I’m staying busy with my day job and various other things.  My wife has been good about keeping me patient and encouraged with my book, reminding me that I shouldn’t put pressure on myself to do things that would prevent me from being present with her and our son.  I agree and will continue to work, being okay if my plans get pushed out.  I still have time.

Call to Action:  Just a reminder that I will be stepping back from writing after this month.  I will do posts every five days with the first coming on the 5th of the month.  However, I will be taking two weeks off from writing anything when the baby is born.  So, if the baby is born April 4th (his actual due date), I will not post until the 20th.  Make sure to sign up for the newsletter though.  I fully intend to send that out April 30th to subscribers.

Sunday Levity: Book Store Signs

posted in: Books, Life, Reading, Sunday Levity | 4


I’ve decided if I ever own a business, it will be a bookstore. I may even look at investing in a bookstore when I retire.  If I do, it will be vibrant with sarcasm, puns, and general book humor.  You know it will.  Put it in the ground, pour water on it, and let the sun shine, I will own a bookstore when I retire.

Also, I will have a coffee bar, writing corner for writers, and plenty of reading nooks and couches.  Invest now!

Godless Review: No Spoilers

posted in: Film/TV, Review | 0

I have a strange relationship with westerns.  I didn’t grow up watching them and would probably consider Kevin Costner’s “Wyatt Earp” (a whopping 3 hr film) my first real exposure to the genre (I still have a love for this film that most people don’t.  I blame it on the fact that Tombstone was rated R and therefore I was not allowed to watch it back in the early 90s).  Over the years, though, I’ve watched more westerns and grown to enjoy the genre as a whole, but only if it has a few key elements.

Netflix’s “Godless” encapsulates everything I want as a viewer.  It has grit and grime of what I consider a great western.  Sometimes, westerns don’t feel right to me.  I expect and imagine frontier life was not clean or easy.  Sometimes, westerns feel too…shiny.  Instead, I want to feel every piece of granule of discomfort that I believe life was back during that time.  Few luxuries could be found.  “Godless” delivers on all fronts.

Set mostly in New Mexico back in the late 1800s, we are introduced to territory that is for lack of a better word, godless.  The law is sparse as the military is spread thin over the west and outlaws run rampant.  The most notorious is Frank Griffon.  With a group of twenty plus men, he is searching for Roy Goode who betrayed him and stole a great deal of money from the group.  Frank is injured and forced to hold off his search while Roy runs.

Most of the story takes place in the small mining town of La Belle where the population was cut in half a year prior when all the men who worked in the town’s mine died due to an accident.  Made up now of mostly women, children, and a few older men, the town is struggling financially.  We are introduced to a great many characters who round out a strong cast.  Aside from the beautiful cinematography and great casting, it’s the weight of the conflict that drives the story.

Every major and even some of the minor characters are fleshed out very well.  You sympathize with several (good or bad) and find yourself engrossed in what will happen.  The show takes several twists and turns, leaving you shocked that what you expected of a western is not the case.  Like I said, I want to feel every granule of sand and gunpowder and “Godless” throws it at you.  The action is felt more than just watched.

As for inspiring me as a writer, there were small elements for character building that I latched onto.  Just small details that I noticed and even if I pointed that out as something that is perfect for characters development, some people might look at me like I was a nerd (and I am but that’s besides the point).

I would be absolutely fine and satisfied with only one season of “Godless” and it ends in a manner that closes out the show in a satisfying way.  However, I would not hesitate to watch more of this unforgiving world.  If you are a fan of shows like Deadwood or Hell on Wheels, you’ll enjoy this one.

Call to Action:  I’m looking for beta readers for my book.  If interested, please let me know.  If you know of anyone who has done good work as a beta reader for other writers, please pass the word along.  It helps if you are well-read but you do not necessarily need to be a huge fan of fantasy.  Thanks!

Bitter Truths: Self-Editing

Just as it has taken years for me to learn and find my writing voice, it takes just as much time to find the self-editor’s touch.  I wrote a post last year about my editing process and as I’ve gotten further into the process, getting closer to looking for an agent, I’ve learned a few things that expand that process.  Sometimes, I forget that it’s never as cut and dry as I would hope.

I know what it is to pay a professional editor to put their hand on my writing but when dealing with a manuscript of 250k+ words, you can easily see why financially, it’s near impossible for me to take that course.  The cheapest editor I found was cents per word.  It adds up quick (trust me).  So, I have to trust my own abilities and also that of the few beta readers I’ve been able to work with.

Besides just the grammatical issues a writer has to deal with (run-on sentences, comma splices, split infinitives, etc.), I have to focus on consistency throughout the story and its three major viewpoints.  I have close to 50 secondary characters who speak (a rough guess on that number) and maybe double the number of tertiary characters who are mentioned by description and limited dialogue.  Not only do I need to make sure all of these maintain their descriptive elements, but there’s also the customs, history, and societies that have to be consistent.  As you can imagine, this is time consuming when editing.

Hence, my delay and taking longer than expected to begin sending out my query letters.  Not to mention the arrival of our first born in less than a month.  By the way, I’m not complaining about any of this.  I just wanted to make clear why things are moving slower than I had hoped when laying out my goals at the beginning of the new year.  It’s tough but not heartbreaking, hahaha.  I’ll adjust and get to these writing goals when I can.

It’s not crazy or even hard to admit that once the baby joins us, I will re-prioritize.  He will be number one and he should be.  I have waited a long time to be a father and not even my dream of being published would interfere with my heart and desire to be a capable and good father.  In fact, I trust that timing and seasons are always meant for my well-being and growth.  Entering parenthood now (so close to finishing and being satisfied with my novel) will have an impact on me as a person and therefore on me as a writer.

Call to Action:  I finally finished the show, Godless, on Netflix.  Check it out!  Highly recommended.  In fact, I think my next blog post will be a full review.

Forever Re-watchable – When Harry Met Sally

posted in: Film/TV, Review, Storytelling | 2

When Harry Met Sally is a film I never watched as a kid (for good reason since it’s subject matter is best reserved for adults).  All I knew about it was the infamous restaurant scene (you know the one).  So it was never on my radar growing up but I eventually found it when I got older and once I did, I have faithfully watched it at least 2-3 times a year.

Let’s go over the premise.  Two newly graduated college students who don’t know each other but are moving to New York City to pursue very different career paths wind up driving from Chicago to the Big Apple.  Along the way, they realize they are very different and do not foresee any chance of a relationship.

Over the next several years, they cross paths, catch up on life, and separate once again.  After they both have failed long term relationships, they cross paths in a bookstore (there is no better place to meet people) and begin spending time together, letting a friendship grow naturally.  There’s a mutual understanding that neither is interested romantically as they each pursue separate relationships.

Well, as fate (and a bit of natural biology) would have it, things change and love blossoms.  Honestly, if this a spoiler, it’s your own fault that you haven’t treated yourself to this gem of a film.  Love comes and we see these friends we’ve been rooting for the entire film finally end up together.

I can’t remember my exact age when I watched this great movie for the first time but I’m sure it was during my film revival era (see my previous post O Brother Where Art Thou?).  I remember being captivated by the characters and their journey to love.  The acting by stars Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan simply make this film work.  The direction by Rob Reiner and writing by Nora Ephron are just as superb but without the chemistry of Crystal and Ryan, this movie doesn’t last and maintain its longevity.

On rainy days, this is the movie my wife and I turn to.  For whatever the reason, the setting of New York City always seems like Fall.  This aesthetic is like a secondary character.  The colors of Autumn lead us along the advancement of Harry and Sally’s long season of friendship.  All you need is a blanket and a hot beverage (preferably coffee) to cuddle and laugh.

Quotability.  This film is rife with quotable lines.  If you know me and spend any long amount of time with me, then you know I love to quote movies (I’m not the greatest at the quote game but I love to play).  From the obscure quotes like, “You know, I have a theory that hieroglyphics are just an ancient comic strip about a character named Sphinxy,” to the best known, “I’ll have what she’s having”, there are too many moments to mention without just putting the movie on.

Call to Action:  If you haven’t seen When Harry Met Sally, I highly recommend it.  If you have, then I highly recommend you watch it on a rainy day.

Blog Changes Announcement

After giving it some extended consideration, I’ve decided to make some changes to my blog post schedule.  While I’ve enjoyed providing roughly ten blog posts a month, that number will be cut in half starting next month.  The simple reason is I will have a newborn and I cannot quite determine or guess what my schedule and capacity will be for producing posts on a regular basis.

So, starting in April I will be posting every fifth day of the month (5, 10, 15, etc.).  Nothing else will change.  You all will continue to get my musings on writing, storytelling, films, and so on.  The Shoals to the Hallowed flash fiction posts will continue to be posted on the last post of the month.

Also, with the end of April fast approaching, I will be working on the first newsletter of the year.  You can definitely expect baby news in that one, hahaha!  And at least a dozen pics of cuteness!

As for my book, life and its interruptions have slowed my plans.  Often, and other writers can attest to this, our schedules are somewhat cracked and tossed about like a ball by the unexpected.  My last bit of editing touches have taken longer and some minor additional fixes need to be in place before I’m satisfied with it.

The goal for the year remains to be agent querying and I am working at getting there.  My wife and I have even bought a desk for the living room where I plan on seating myself in order to focus my mind.  I’ve noticed I struggle to stay focused if I remain on the couch while trying to work.  Even if the tv is off, I think I associate that position with fixed relaxation rather than active creation.

I’m continually thankful to everyone who reads, comments, and encourages me as I pursue my dream of publication.  You help me push forward.

Call to Action: Seeing as how there will be fewer bits of content in the future, I am pushing my newsletter more.  There may be more meat in it seeing as how I will want to make it more appealing.  So, if you haven’t signed up for it and want to get exclusive book reviews and Shoals to the Hallowed short stories that specifically to fill the gaps in the flash fiction, please sign up!  It’s easy and free!

Black Panther Review – No Spoilers

posted in: Film/TV, Review, Storytelling | 0

Every year, the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) expands further and deeper.  We are currently in the thralls of Phase 3 with the end of that phase, Infinity War (Part 1 and 2), fast approaching.  Since Iron Man hit theaters in the early 2000s, we’ve received new characters with unique and interesting back stories, conflicts, and victories each new year.  Some of these stories delve heavily into the Infinity Stone arc, which will act as the finale of Phase 3 and toss us into Phase 4 (however it all ends, who can say?).

Black Panther is the most recent of the MCU titles and we are launched into a fascinating world that has not been seen but has been alluded to.  In Captain America: Civil War (or Avengers 2.5 as I like to call it), we are introduced to T’Challa who is the son of the king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda.  T’Challa’s father is killed in an explosion and we get our first look at the Black Panther as he pursues and looks to apprehend the man responsible for killing his father.  We don’t get much else of a backstory for Black Panther but the introduction does what it needs to: get us excited and interested in the new character.

My wife and I took in Black Panther opening weekend and we both really enjoyed the film.  It was not so much an origin story as it was a continuation of what happened in Civil War.  We were introduced to a beautiful and vibrant world in the Wakanda setting.  Several tribes of distinct peoples allow us to see the inner workings of the history and culture.  We see technology that has been widely kept secret in order to keep the countries resources from being spread to the outside world (mainly for military purposes).  Finally, we are exposed to a power struggle of self when a new king is forced to make difficult decisions and question whether or not the way of the past is the right way to proceed into the future.

Visually, the movie is stunning.  We get both strong and conflicted characters (male and female are equally portrayed, which is always a pleasure).  The action is fast and visceral.  Humor falls in place when needed and does not feel forced to add levity when it’s not needed.  The villains are memorable and just as conflicted as the heroes.  My only gripe has to do with the CGI.  Sometimes, it does not feel as seamless as you would hope in the final cut of a film of this caliber.  Maybe a bit nitpicky but I did notice it a few times)

Overall, I really enjoyed the film and messages it conveyed.  The importance of family and fathers was especially poignant.  Just like last year’s Coco, I cannot help but be drawn into a story that explores the need for family and remembering where you came from.  As we gear up towards Infinity War with stories focused on broader levels, it is always refreshing to see these more condensed stories.  We need more of them and I hope they continue to be made and shared.

Call to Action:  You know what I’m going to say here!  Go see it!  Judge for yourself.  Don’t be led one way or another on films just because of critics.  If you’re initially drawn and interested, take a friend or loved one to the cinema for a few hours.

Flash Fiction: Shoal Cursed

Cursed.  There could be no greater punishment than to be Shoal cursed.  The Shoals were an enigma even after centuries of use by the Wielders.  Books were written and burned, corrected and ink-blotted.  Some claimed the Shoals could not be properly studied or analyzed due to their volatility.  None, not even the most elder and strongest of Wielders in history dared spend more than a few minutes in their Shoal for fear of madness, death, or worse.

Therefore, the practice of Shoalways and cuts–the smallest openings necessary to wield the harbored power–were all that was allowed.  Not even the maddest of Wielders would dare risk oblivion to the world by creating a rift in the fabric between realms.  Shoals themselves were volatile and treacherous yet somehow, for some reason, the Hallowed allowed such interference.  Was there an answer to why?

Oran sat in the alleyway with his back pressed into the jagged stone wall, alone in the early morning, quarreling with himself over this matter.  His mind was a stall of angry bulls kicking and gorging wherever they could to come out the victor.  His clothes were little more than tatters after weeks of running and hiding from enemies.  His stink was enough to make the dogs sniff and leave him alone.  Food had to be stolen unless he risk returning to his home.

The streets of Breshtk carried no truths to the whereabouts and condition of Queen Erise.  Rumors dripped with uncertainty and dubious details.  She was seen alive in the village of Bolle or dead, executed by a mob of angry farmers on the Trader’s Road.  One rumor even claimed she returned to the palace accompanied by a small cadre of Wielders, killing everyone due to Shoal madness.  Oran deciphered no truth from any of the stories.

He had to find her.  The Wielder, Delya Glasene, could not be trusted.  He convinced himself of that now.  His duty called him beyond this impasse.  Destiny demanded his action.  He stood, looking out into the busy square.  None so much as glanced his way.  To their uncaring eyes, he was another beggar.  Not the Breshtk Battle Lord, Oran Ki’Tanil.

The rumors needed to be sifted through.  He needed viable information to move beyond the uncertainty.  He flexed his hands, stretched his arms, legs, and back before considering his lone belongings.  Bundled in scraps of firewood, his named swords lay in wait despite his fear of touching them.  Shoal-cursed things should not be handled carelessly.

In Search of a Quiet Place

Why is it so hard to find a quiet place, absent of all other people of the human race?  You’d think I could find a spot where I can sit down with my book and read it out loud without another soul within listening distance.  Alas (yes, I use this word often), it seems forever unattainable.

You might be asking why this is so important to me.  Seems kind of silly to be obsessed (your word, not mine) to find a place of seclusion.  Well, it’s part insecurity on my part and part the need for peace as I audibly dissect what I’ve written, only ever hearing it in the echo dome of my head so far.  Hearing my story out loud is just another step towards polishing it before sending out those inquiry letters to agents.

The next question one might ask is what my ideal location would be to endure this endeavor?  I’ve been thinking about this for over a week and I think the best I can come up with is a space with sunlight, quality air flow, a kitchen, and as much coffee and donuts as I can stomach.  Okay, okay.  No donuts.  I don’t need those delicious morsels of self-hatred (that’s my special name for donuts whenever I succumb to their temptation).  I keep thinking a basement or office space would work for my reading needs but that’s only because I don’t have access to a cabin out in the woods (too many horror movies prevent me from going in search of such a place).

So I’m still working on it.  I can’t do this in the peace and quiet of my own apartment because I have a neighbor above us who finds it his sole purpose in life to watch tv all day and speak in volumes usually reserved for professional sporting events.  Oh, and he has a lady friend who is equally loud to which every time I hear her laugh I ask what’s that sound and my wife says, “Those are the shrieking eels”.

I’m open to ideas.  If anyone has a basement, attic, and/or guest house they don’t mind me vacating for free for a few hours at a time, I would be forever grateful.  Tell you what, I’ll offer you a once in a lifetime Amazon gift card for your graciousness too.  Only caveat is you have to buy a book(s) with it.  HA!

Call to Action:  If you have any other suggestions for me, feel free to share.  I’m not quite desperate yet but I’m fast approaching!

Reading Goals for 2018

posted in: Books, Fantasy, Reading | 2

Aside from my writing and life goals for the year, I also have a reading goal.  I know I’ve mentioned it before, but I use Goodreads.com to track the books I read for the year.  It’s an amazing site and provides so much great information on books.  I can get lost looking through the recommended sections because they provide many suggestions of books that are not bestsellers or mainstream titles.

This year, I’ve dropped my goal from 50 books to 30 books.  But I don’t want to just read 30 random books.  I want to expand on the quality of books I’m reading.  No matter what, I can read fantasy.  It’s not even hard for me to find books in my preferred genre but I continue to think and encourage myself to read more outside of my comfort and preference.

Last year, I was happy to explore more contemporary fiction and biographies.  I was pleasantly surprised by some of the books I read and if you are signed up for my newsletter, you saw many of those reviewed and recommended.  (Also, you should sign up for my newsletter if you haven’t yet.)

This year, I’d like to include some classic literature into my reading.  There are tons of titles to choose from so I will have quite a few to pick through.  Whether it’s Dickens or Hemingway, I’d like to read books from eras I’m not familiar with and see what I can glean from them as a modern day writer.  What lessons can I learn?  What can I learn from their use of language?  Can I find something to implement into my own writing?  These are all viable questions and I think there’s a sense of honoring those who came before me that I’ve never taken advantage of before.  It would be a crime not to dive into the pages of the classics just because I might believe there’s nothing to be gained, which is unabashedly not true.  With a little opening of my mind, I think I can come away appreciating the history of fiction.

Call to Action: Throw a recommendation at me!  I promise you, I haven’t read much when it comes to the classics besides Shakespeare’s plays.  I’m open to everything!

Forever Re-watchable: O Brother, Where Art Thou?

posted in: Film/TV, Review | 2

I love talking about movies (if you’ve followed my blog for any amount of time, you’ll have guessed that).  One great thing about movies for me is how re-watchable they are.  There are some that I can watch once (looking at you Fight Club and every Tarantino film ever) and be fine with never seeing it again.  Then there are those others that are gems in my eyes.  I can always watch them.  It doesn’t matter my mood or the day, throw it on the flat screen and I’m willing to lend precious hours of the day to it.

This kind of post will likely become a new monthly staple because I think the movies that are your favorites say a lot about you.  The movies that are most re-watchable for me can be for any number of reasons and it’s not limited to popular comedies or action movies.  If you were to look at my movie collection, you’d nod in agreement, shake your head in bewilderment, and want to smack me at the sight of too many Michael Bay films (13 Hours is a brilliant film that I will never apologize for having in my collection).

As you already know by the title, “O Brother, Where Art Though” is one of the most re-watchable movies for me.  It might surprise you though that I avoided it when it first came out in 2000.  There were multiple reasons for this.  I was a freshman in high school and truly lacked any sensible taste in movies, I was not a fan of George Clooney who I had only previously seen in the nightmare that was Batman and Robin (holy bat-nipples Batman!), and I didn’t like the “Man of Constant Sorrows” song (my taste in music was up there in my taste of movies in the year 2000:  Sour and bitter, lol).

So, it wasn’t until after high school circa 2004-05ish that I finally saw the film.  I was at my grandparents’ house while a bunch of extended family was in town for a holiday (probably Thanksgiving or Christmas) and the decision was made to watch a movie.  Now, my grandparents didn’t have many movies.  In fact, I am fairly certain they possessed two movies in my entire lifetime:  Fantasia and O Brother, Where Art Thou?.

The latter movie was picked and I grumbled under my breath because I was a punk (sour and bitter).  The movie’s going and I realize pretty quickly that I’m actually enjoying the movie a lot.  The dialogue is quick and fluid, the humor is subtle and on point, and the music is unlike anything I had really heard up until that point.  What was happening?  Well, I was acclimating to a brilliant film.

The Coen Brothers are masterful storytellers.  I will eventually write a blog post just on them as filmmakers but for now, I have to sing their praise for just this single film.  I know it’s strange but I truly do believe that they had a hand in what I will call my cinephile birth.  Thinking back now, I can truthfully pinpoint this experience with “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” as the moment when I began to appreciate film for more than just entertainment value.

For me, “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” is forever re-watchable.  I love the pace, the quotability , and cinematography equally.  I think you have to love every aspect of a film in order to be able to always be in the mood for it.  There has to be this sense of, “I will feel better if I watch this.  It will make me happy and last with me the rest of the day”.  And this film does this every time.

Call to Action:  Let me know what you think of “O Brother, Where Art Thou?”  If you haven’t watched it before, I highly recommend you do so now.  Is it a favorite or one that’s just okay in your book?

Flash Fiction: Old Wolves

Bramble crunched underneath the wagon wheels of the merchant train.  No rain had touched this part of the world in months.  The city of Rastome was still days away according to the mile markers painted on heavy rocks set alongside the Sael Highway.

In the days since leaving the capital city, Charun, Barston kept to himself and followed orders.  He along with the other hired guards were mostly ignored by their merchant employer whose name was Lavan Pahl.  It was Pahl’s partner, Freilas Atruam, who bore the signs of a former soldier giving most of the commands to the hired men.

Barston found himself drawn to Freilas as if he knew the older man all his life.  Thin but strong, bearing dark skin and stony eyes, he moved as if the world could not contain him.  A deadliness inhabited him as well.  Adept with a bow and sword alike, he did not waver when the first group of road bandits attacked the previous day.

They lost two of the hired guards during the scuffle while two others had to be put on litters much to the chagrin of Pahl.  Freilas had a way of explaining and calming his partner, which the guards appreciated after realizing Pahl played to loose and free with his mule whip.  Barston believed there to be a great story behind Freilas’ life and wanted to know it.  Was their shame?  Dishonor?  If so, he had found peace.  Barston cared little for such a gift for himself but to see it in Freilas made him curious.

When Freilas came alongside him all of a sudden, Barston forced himself to relax.  The older man did not engage in private conversations unless a reprimand was coming.

“The men say you did not draw your sword yesterday.”  Freilas’ voice was like ice sliding against a boulder.  Up close, the smell roasted red root was undeniable and was the obvious reason for the man’s voice.  Smoking the crushed pieces of red root was not kind to the throat.

Barston swallowed.  “I didn’t need to draw it.  My dagger did just fine.”

Freilas gave him a sidelong look.  “You don’t happen to be one of those pit fighters back in the capital, are you?”

The smile could not be kept away.  “No,” Barston said.  “Just one who knows when a dagger’s reach will suffice.”

“Hmm.  Lavan wants me to have you punished.  Don’t worry; it won’t happen.  You may be reckless but you managed to gut two of the road rats with that short steel.  Make sure you don’t hesitate to draw the long blade next time.  I’ll be watching then.  You can’t be blade shy these days.”

He separated from Barston and quickened to the front of the train.  The exhale of breath did not leave Barston feeling better.  His eyes darted about the countryside, hoping to the Hallowed they would not be attacked again.

On This Day: 15 Jan 1985 – Ender’s Game First Published

posted in: Fantasy, On This Day, Reading, Review | 0

I’m not a big science fiction reader.  If you’ve been following me over the last year, I’ve made that pretty clear.  I don’t have a good reason for it except to say while I enjoy watching sci-fi movies, reading sci-fi is a struggle.

However, there is one sci-fi book that I love and cherish: Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game.

I read Ender’s Game my freshman year of high school (this might have to do with my love for it since this is when I fell in love with reading in general).  My friends encouraged me to read it and I couldn’t put it down.  It was unlike anything I’d ever experienced before and did not bore me to tears.

Andrew “Ender” Wiggins is the youngest of three children in a future where only two children are allowed per family.  All children are born with an implanted monitoring device, which is used by the government to pick out children they deem worthy of going to Battle School.  The children selected for such an honor are monitored and trained by the International Fleet (IF) in hopes to create new generations of soldiers to fight in an ongoing war with an alien race referred to as “Buggers”.

At Battle School, Ender makes friends and enemies as he tries to rise through the ranks despite his young age and small stature.  He is faced with challenge after challenge by the IF to see if he can withstand the pressure.  We follow his mistakes and victories (there are plenty of both) as he struggles not only physically but psychologically to be the best.

I continually find myself returning to this book.  I’ll often listen to the audiobook or watch the movie (this is not the greatest of adaptations but decent and worth watching) because I can’t help but engage in Ender’s story.  It’s a story that is complex without being overly complex.  I would argue it’s a grounded sci-fi, offering new ideas and advanced technology without inundating you with so much, you feel like your head will pop.

Call to Action: I highly recommend the book.  It’s not a long read and you’ll fall in love with Ender and some of the other characters.

Rewriting the End…Again

Starting a story is easy for me.  I don’t know why but it just is.  The end?  Not so much.  I have yet to know the end of a story (I mean in the novella or novel form) before I start from the beginning.

For most of 2017 I have been working on my rewrite/edit of my book, So Speaks the Gallows (if you’ve been keeping up with my blog and/or are subscribed to my newsletter, then you know this already).  As I near the end of this endeavor, it’s interesting to find I have probably put the most work into the beginning and end of the book.  I think this is good because of two reasons: the beginning is what I am banking on the reader to be gripped by (to keep reading) and the end should be satisfactory as a whole but also urge the reader to want to continue on this world.  For the ending, I’m definitely more satisfied with the changes I’ve made.

Once my edit is complete, I am not finished (you never truly are finished with a story).  I have both beta reader and personal notes that I need to go back through the book and apply.  These are minuscule in size.  Some are basic fixes like making sure I mention a detail about a character or place.  Others might be a consistency issue.  Now, some might think this trivial but I always think about the world needing to be lived in.  It’s those small details that help add shades and tones, seeing the richness of everything.

I’ve been working on this book for a decade and I continue to be surprised when I come across a section or passage that makes me cringe.  My eyes roll over it so easily now that I know I need to move slower from page to page.  After all the editing is done, I will read my book out loud (alone without another soul within a hundred yards).  The reason for this is to make sure what I read flows and doesn’t read clunky.  I’ve got the future audiobook to consider!

So, I’m progressing with this wonderful story that I love to immerse myself into.  I know the world and characters so well (I better after so many years!) and I continue to want to do them justice.  I can’t get complacent or sloppy.  Not now.

Call to Action:  Anyone have any book recommendations?  I realized I don’t ask this enough and I’m always looking for new books to add to my “To read” list.  Fiction, non-fiction, autobiographies, etc.  Let me know!

My Top Ten Films of 2017

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Review | 2

I always see top ten lists of films at the close of the year and I thought it would be fun to do the same.  Granted, I haven’t seen every major release so I can’t give those a rating or even consideration.  For example, I haven’t seen “Get Out” or “Split” so I can’t include those, though I have heard great things about both films.

My taste in movies can be odd at times.  Sometimes, I will fall in love with a film for a very simple reason, which stands out and makes a lasting impression in my extensive film mind-vault.  Lists are subjective, so if you disagree or think I’m plain crazy, that’s cool.  Send me your list and I’ll give it a read and tell you why I think you’re crazy.

Note: I’ll avoid spoilers with each blurb.

10. It

A horror movie is in my top ten?!  Yes.  Yes it is.  Let me explain.  Despite being a genre that I don’t prefer, this was a very well-done film.  The acting was great, especially considering the child actors who were the heartbeat of the story.  Without their amazing performances, this would have flopped hard.  Pennywise, the villain, is not enough to make this a top ten movie.  He’s there, he’s the antagonist, but it’s how the kids band together to defeat him that makes this work.  You can check out my full review here: http://adamhenderson.net/2017/09/24/why-i-watched-it/

9. Gifted

To be honest, Gifted did not seem to be on a lot of people’s radars when it came to movies in 2017.  From the trailer, we see a precocious little girl being raised by her uncle who has a knack and ability to solve difficult mathematical equations despite her age.  It’s not really an original story idea but the reason why it made my list (besides just being heartfelt and well-performed) is a particular scene in the middle of the movie.  As the little girl is having a difficult time adjusting to the attention she’s getting for her genius, her uncle takes her to a hospital and they’re waiting and waiting (she doesn’t understand why and neither do we, the watchers) when a new father comes out to the waiting room and announces the birth of his child to his family who has been waiting for hours.  Excitement ensues and the little girl joins in.  Seriously, this kicked me in the feels and tugged the heart strings.  Check this one out if you haven’t yet.

8. Logan Lucky

Under-rated and under-the-radar.  Logan Lucky is not only fun but has great, subtle moments that you miss upon first watch.  It’s directed by Steven Sodenberg who directed the Ocean’s Eleven trilogy.  This has a similar feel but involves West Virginia, NASCAR, and Daniel Craig with a hilarious accent.  How this movie was ignored by people, I don’t understand but it is absolutely worth your time.

7. War for the Planet of the Apes

I never cared for the older Planet of the Apes films.  I was an 80s kid but only saw the first and it didn’t grab ahold of me like other sci-fi properties.  However, I have been a huge fan of the newer films.  The motion capture technology plays a big part in the performances of the “apes”.  Andy Serkis is a Mo-cap master.  Just look into his career and it’s impressive.  This is the third installment and surprised me on many levels.  Not only does it progress the story, which leads into the original PotA movie but it brings true depth to the Apes and their will to survive and find peace.

6. Coco

Vibrant and beautiful.  Coco is a stunning film with so much heart, you can’t help but walk away feeling like you did not waste your time.  It’s visually amazing as the animation continues to push the bounds and it has an amazing message of family and honoring those from the past and those in the present.  Check out my previous blog post for more: http://adamhenderson.net/2017/12/06/how-pixar-and-disney-help-me-appreciate-different-cultures/

5. Spider-Man: Homecoming

Tobey Maguire was good.  Andrew Garfield was okay.  Tom Holland is perfect.  Yes, in my mind, this version of our friendly neighborhood Spider-man was and is the best of the roster we’ve seen in films.  Keeping Spidey in high school is a must.  Not rehashing the origin story is the best decision of the story.  Having Michael Keaton as the main villain brought weight and actual conflict to the plot.  Hands down, I am most excited to see where this franchise goes more than any other Marvel property in the cinematic universe.

4. The Big Sick

This was a pleasant surprise.  I watched the trailer and thought to myself, “I have to see this movie”.  For those unaware, it’s based on a true story of how the main character met his wife.  Some things were changed for the flow of the film but the basic plot is the same.  It’s a pseudo-rom com that focuses more on how the main male protagonist sacrifices his time to be near the girl he cares greatly for while she’s in a coma (not a spoiler if you’ve seen the trailer).  What I loved most about the film is the relationship formed between him and the girl’s parents in the middle of this horrible situation.  It has heart and humor by the fistfuls.

3. Wonder Woman

I don’t know what more I can say about Wonder Woman than I already have in my previous blog post review, which you can read here: http://adamhenderson.net/2017/06/15/wonder-woman-thoughts-and-impact/

This movie gave me chills.  The No Man’s Land sequence is probably my favorite of any movie in the last few years let alone 2017.  Gal Gadot is mesmerizing and embodies the character of Wonder Woman perfectly.  Even though I did not like the climax (#bossfights), I would still give this film a high score and I can’t wait to see what they do in the sequel.

2. Baby Driver

Surprise film of the year for me.  I saw the trailer and thought it was worth watching.  Could be good.  I like director, Edgar Wright, who did Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz.  Should be a fun watch.  What I got though was a fast action caper synced to the second thing I love most behind storytelling: music.  Action, comedy, and drama.  All of it is there.  Throw in slick editing and production and you’ve got what might be a universal top five film on most lists.

1. Logan

My favorite movie of 2017 is hands-down Logan.  Confession time: I cried during the trailer.  That two and a half minute video soaked in the age and conviction of Johnny Cash, covering “Hurt” by Nine Inch Nails just broke me.  And yes, I did tear up during the film itself as well.  The reason, though, that Logan was my favorite movie was the finality of the character and his struggle through life.  In my opinion, there is no more tormented super hero than Logan aka Wolverine.  For almost two decades over several films, Hugh Jackman brought the titular hero to life.  Due to the nature of the film industry, it’s inevitable to see someone else don the adamantium claws but I remain convinced that Jackman brought the depth needed so we got a legitimate Wolverine and not some campy nonsense that left a bad taste in our mouths.  Go here for my complete review: http://adamhenderson.net/2017/03/06/logan-reaction/

Runner-ups: Thor: Ragnarok, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Free Fire

Call to Action: This list is prone to change since there are about a dozen movies I still need to see: The Shape of Water, Hostiles, Downsizing, The Greatest Showman, I, Tonya, The Disaster Artist, Blade Runner 2049, Battle of the Sexes, etc.  If I do make some updates, I’ll make sure to let you all know by a blog post.  I have a feeling the list could be impacted.

A New Year to Embrace

posted in: Editing/Revision, Life, Writing | 2

What will happen in 2018?  I know I can’t be the only person to ask this question as we enter another new year (yeesh, as I get older, I lose the enthralling alacrity of what that means).  Obviously, my hope and prayers are that we suffer no losses, come ahead in our bank account statements, come out even or ahead in taxes, etc.  On a grander level, I’d sure love to see some social media climate change.  The vitriol every day definitely got old and I fear for the sanity of anyone who took delight in seeing the onslaught of drama and pettiness exhibited through social media streams every day.  Maybe it’s just wishful thinking and I should aim lower.  How about Deadpool 2 being better than the first?  Oh, and I’d love it if Avengers: Infinity War doesn’t take a nap.  I’ll set my expectations low.

Personally, I’d like to be kinder and gain some patience.  Come April, our baby boy will teach me a lot about myself.  I told my wife the other day that I want to make sure we not only prepare ourselves for his arrival and addition to our lives but also make sure we get rest, find time to relax and read (very important for new parents, I think), and be intentional about having time together.  I have this sense that as new parents, we will need to make necessary adjustments (an obvious statement) but also make sure we don’t burn out and let our emotions beat us down or each other for that matter.  And don’t tell me, “Oh just you wait, you’ll be crap-deep in diapers, crying, and baby puke” as if that’s all it is.  I kind of refuse to settle for that kind of attitude.  Our baby will not be a burden but a joy!  (If I’m wrong, you can take it to the bank that I won’t come back here and admit it to all of you.)

We went through a lot of changes and shifts in 2017 (still talking about myself and my wife. No political commentary here).  Job changes, pregnancy, financial decisions, etc.  I think we needed to make those choices last year in preparation for this year, which I foresee to be more stable.  There will be surprises (some good and some bad) and we will have to be ready and act as everyone must in order to keep the unexpected from keeping you on the ground.  What I want, though, is to learn and grow in each moment.

To gain wisdom is what I want most in 2018.  As a husband, father, brother, son, professional, writer, musician, and however else I might describe myself, I want to come away, and exhale accomplishment.  Maybe I’ll do that by the end of 2018 here on the blog.  In fact, here we go, on 27 December 2018, my blog post will be a look back on the year, but also an inspection of this first post of the year.  We’ll see if I accomplished what I wanted to succeed in.  Wisdom is what I’ll be chasing in 2018.

Call to Action: What would you like to see in 2018?  Doesn’t have to be a personal goal but let me know what you’d like to see or experience.

Flash Fiction: Faces and Places

The falling dust mesmerized Teelee as she watched wide-eyed.  It was her favorite part of helping Master Shotra.  She was not to call him the Twig any longer as they traveled together.

Settled against the wet canvas, her eyes ran along the dust-covered surface, reading the words written.  No, they were not written like one would see on a sign or a piece of parchment.  These words were different, though she did not think she could describe it to anyone if they asked.

“What do you see?” Master Shotra asked.  They had stopped off the side of the road along the countryside, heading for a place called Duggin’s Hill, which Teelee had read on a previous canvas.

The day was bright and warm but Teelee kept one eye on the gray clouds in the distance.  She did not like rain.  That would mean coldness and it would also mean she would be soaked through.  Her brother had punished her by making her sit underneath the leak in the roof after she “stole” his place with Master Shotra.  She told him it was an accident but Dag did not care.

“Girl,” Master Shotra said, poking her in the ribs.  He pointed at the canvas.  “Pay attention.  You’ll not be returned home until we’ve completed our task.  Now,” he pointed at the canvas again, “read.”

Teelee could not help looking at the clouds again before turning to the canvas.  “Delya.”

Master Shotra stiffened and winced.  “And?”

She let her eyes roam over the canvas until she found another word.  “Glassene.”

“Hallowed harbor me,” Master Shotra slumped, dropping to a sitting position on the dusty ground.  “Of all the…  You’re certain?”  She nodded and he spoke on, saying things she did not understand.  “Of course it would be.  Always the loyal hound to the Holds…  This is just punishment.  Penance for my errors.”

Teelee ignored him, uninterested in the canvas now that she finished her job.  She moved to the mule that pulled their wagon.  Master Shotra said it had no name so she had decided on one for him on their first day together.

“Hello, Apple.”  The animal’s love for the fruit was indeed the leading factor for the name.  “I hate rain.  I hope we stay dry for the rest of the day.  Today’s my birthday but I don’t think Master Shotra knows that.  Mother would have given me honey this morning…”

Master Shotra was pacing now, still talking to himself, oblivious to the world.  Teelee leaned in close to Apple’s ear, “Don’t tell him but I saw something more this time in the dust.  It scared me, Apple…  I don’t want Master Shotra to die.”

First Year Retrospect

Crazy.  That’s my best-word choice and thinking when I consider the last year.  I took to starting a website and blog with the idea that I wanted to write more and establish a platform as a writer.  I had some ideas and believed I could begin to have a voice in a world full of voices.  After a year, I think I made a dent but not a full impact.

While the website could use an update (I’m in the process of looking at my options), the blog has been the bigger surprise.  I started by writing about writing, especially my own thoughts and experiences with the craft.  Looking back, this was a much needed release because I had things I wanted to say but did not have an outlet.  The blog gave me that and now I feel ready to go beyond those topics.

I like themes and scheduled topics.  Sunday Levity, On This Day, and Flash Fiction posts allowed me to do this and those have been extremely fun and rewarding.  Each will continue moving forward and more than likely be a staple of my blog.  The posts in between will likely change and shift focus.  I loved being able to do my Stranger Things Season 1 Review and Rewatch in October.  With Season 3 green lit, you can expect the same treatment for Season 2.  There will be less in terms of “writing” posts but you’ll continue to get my thoughts from a writing perspective as I encounter new stories and even go back and explore old ones.

Outside of the blog and website, my life has taken unexpected turns.  Come April, my wife and I will be arms deep in parenthood.  How this will affect me as a writer, I cannot begin to know or guess but it will bring an adjustment.  That baby will be priority number 1a with my wife being 1b.  They will be my focus.  Then I’ll have work and then writing.  So right now it’s a matter of preparing and putting any notion of selfishness aside.

What I’m not worried about is the time to write.  I will find it.  My plan is to finish So Speaks the Gallows and find an agent remains.  Those updates will be shared and even if I get rejection letters, I will share those with everyone.  Obviously, my hope would be to receive a letter stating an agent would love to represent me but the more I follow other writers on social media, the more I see that rejection letters are more common than acceptance letters.  Maybe 2018 will be my year of querying.

When it comes to the newsletter, I’ll stick with it and hopefully get more sign ups.  It makes it easier for me to devote the time (it is time consuming) to provide more content if I know I’m reaching more people.  However, I do understand if people have too many newsletters arriving in their inboxes.  The more you have, the less time you have to read them all.

Other than that, I have some other personal goals I’d like to see accomplished but I read somewhere that not all goals should be made public.  Apparently, that can sabotage your chances of finding success.  Not sure if I believe that but I’ll keep them close to the chest for now.

I hope you all have had an amazing year!

Call to Action: The final call to action this year is to sign up for my newsletter.  Seriously, why haven’t you done so yet?  You get some fun book reviews and an exclusive Shoals to the Hallowed short story, which you won’t find anywhere else.  There are things happening in the story you won’t know about unless you sign up.  So do so.

The Last Jedi: Quick Thoughts (No Spoilers)

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Review, Storytelling | 2

After avoiding any potential spoilers for The Last Jedi, I was able to watch it at the end of last weekend.  There will be no spoilers here but I will make references to key plot details in a vague manner (no exact details).

Overall Plot Direction.  TLJ definitely surpassed my expectations when it came to the plot and moving things forward in this Skywalker Saga.  I had read and heard some popular theories about what could happen in the new chapter and while there were hints of these theories coming true, the story went in various directions that were both surprising and refreshing.  There were key moments that I thought to myself, “Yes!  That’s great writing!” and then there were things I had to process after watching and say, “Okay, I like that and I’m curious to see where it goes from there.”  Now, there are also elements that did not work, leaving questions and making many people (I’m sure you’ve seen the bad reviews from people you know) unhappy with the direction of the plot.

Star Wars Spectacle.  Star Wars as a property is synonymous with Jedi, Sith, The Force, etc.  It’s very much a fantasy set in space (something I’m sure that has been covered, debated, and discussed in the past by many a fanboys).  There are aspects to the Force in the film that enrich an enhance what the Force is and how it can be used as a power/weapon.  It’s very much a magic system that doesn’t always have defined lines or rules but that is why the balance between the light and dark side are so important as thematic elements.  How far can one go to either side before being able to come back?  I am excited to see more with the characters who can use the Force.  There should be some fun to be had with our Force users.

Characters.  Character motivations can make or break a story.  Too often, it feels as if a character’s choice is only meant to push the story forward.  Where TLJ works for me is the characters make choices throughout the film where their motivations are clear (after some extra thought and contemplation, there are some instances where this is not true but I’m focusing on the majority).  There is desperation and a time limit in play.  This makes the characters act and do so sometimes recklessly.  However, it felt right and there were consequences to those choices.  My writer brain was once again saying, “Yes, that worked”.

I get some of the points of dislike and contention.  There are viable gripes to some of the plot points that may not land for some.  However, it’s not enough for me to give this film a bad review.  It’s not a perfect film but it’s better than most.  Where The Force Awakens came up short, I feel like The Last Jedi exceeded my expectations.  I felt the weight of the conflict and did not mind the smaller sillier moments (Porg nation is real).

Overall, I put TLJ in my top five Star Wars films (1. The Empire Strikes Back, 2. Rogue One, 3. Return of the Jedi, 4. The Last Jedi, 5. A New Hope).

Call to Action: I’m curious to see what others think of The Last Jedi and how it stacks up against the other films in the series.  Please DO NOT post spoilers in the comments.

Reading Goal Accomplished!

posted in: Fantasy, Reading, Review, Storytelling | 2

For the second year in a row, I’ve achieved my goal to complete my reading goal on Goodreads.  Last year, I was ambitious and did 25 books.  This year, I lost my mind and doubled that, thinking I could do 50.  I did it, but it was not easy.

Let me first say that while I reached 50 books read, the majority of those were audiobooks.  To be honest, I’m not a fast reader so audiobooks definitely help me both on my commute and while at home if we’re keeping the TV off.  Now, I learned some very valuable lessons when approaching these reading challenges and finding success: don’t over-extend yourself.  What I mean by this is I got to the point where I realized I could reach my goal but only if I read or listened to shorter books.  The problem here is I had books I really wanted to read but felt they would take too long to finish.  Obviously, I knew by the end that I needed to rethink my reading goal.

So for next year, I am giving myself some leeway and going to shoot for 30 books.  I’ll very likely read more than 30 but I hated feeling the pressure of finishing a book just so I could keep on track.  Reading in general is essential for me to not only learn but keep my mind active, not depending on stimulation by screen only.  I’m not proud of it but I am one of those people that can always have the TV on.  It doesn’t bother me to have it on just for background noise (this drives my wife crazy and is why we institute “no TV nights” in our house).

If you haven’t signed up for my newsletter then you are unfamiliar with my book reviews.  I like to  write three reviews for my favorite books I read for the last four months (Newsletters are released at the end of April, August, and December).  Below you will find some recommendations not included in any of this year’s newsletters:


The Gunslinger by Stephen King

The first book of The Dark Tower series has been around for awhile and was on “To read” list for years. I finally got into it and really enjoyed the book. It’s not a tough read and establishes interesting characters in an even more interesting world. Action and conflict are not lacking here. For fantasy lovers, it’s a must.


Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick

This was a fun listen since Anna reads the book. She’s the Pitch Perfect girl if you’re unfamiliar with her. She’s also full of spunk and her personality comes through as she reads. I was not aware of her background and her journey to acting and becoming an Oscar-nominated actress so this kept me interested and made me laugh a lot.


Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

I did a longer review of this one a few months back but with the movie adaptation coming out soon, I wanted to highlight it again. It’s a fast-paced virtual adventure with loads of geek-speak and 80s references, which is definitely trending again with Stranger Things Season 2 fresh in our minds. Check this one out even if you’re not a gamer or geek aficionado.

Call to Action: I encourage you to sign up over at Goodreads and take your own reading challenge for 2018.  It’s a lot of fun and if you’re like me, setting a challenge for yourself might get you to set aside time each day to put your nose in the pages.

December Update/Christmas Traditions

posted in: Film/TV, Life, Review, Storytelling | 0


My plan is to keep the normal schedule and format for the blog this month. 
The next flash fiction for the ongoing Shoals to the Hallowed series will be released on 30 December (this also happens to be my bday so I expect high praise in the comments section. If you don’t want to give that, I accept Amazon gift cards).  The third and last newsletter of the year will be released on the 31st.  If you want to sign up for that, please do so when prompted on the website or send me your email address and I’ll add you to the list.

For the month in general (we’re half way done already!), you’ll see a lot of Christmas themed posts.  I’m a big fan of Christmas.  The season (I prefer cold to hot always), movies and music (there’s just so many good options), food and drink (nothing like carbs, coffee, and whiskey to keep me comfortable), and traditions.   It’s these last that I want to explore a little today.


I can only speak for myself and my heart goes out to those who don’t care for the Christmas season for whatever the reason. 
I understand and get it.  However, I have pretty much nothing but good memories of the weeks and days leading up to Christmas.  My family never did anything crazy or outlandish (far from the Griswold experience).  We did the tree and lights.  Maybe a few other decorations around the house.  What I remember best was going to my grandparents’ house Christmas Eve to eat dinner and exchange gifts.  My grandpa would read the Christmas story from the Book of Luke and we’d all go on our merry way (no pun intended).  Christmas morning was getting up way too early (I was one of those kids who could not sleep no matter how late I stayed up), getting into our stockings first and waiting the appropriate amount of time before waking up my parents so we could get to the good stuff.

After we made a mess of the living room, we would eat breakfast and get ready for the day.  Usually we were out the door after noon and heading to the gift exchange locations with friends and families.  Dinner was usually at my grandparents’ house again with or without other family members who came in form out of town.  We ate, played games, and had the 24-hour marathon of A Christmas Story playing in the background.  All in all, it was an easy traditional holiday season that I have fond memories of.

Now that I’m married, my wife and I have our own traditions that we’ve put in place and hope to carry on the rest of the way.  Our children will grow up with these and even have a part in adding to our family’s plans and activities from December to December.  Traditions are one of those things I really enjoy and Christmas allows for them to be focused and anticipated every year.

I’ll leave you with some do’s and don’ts:

Don’t spike the eggnog

Don’t stand under icicles

Don’t sit on Santa’s lap in an alleyway

Do spike your coffee

Do bundle up if it’s snowing

Do watch Christmas Vacation with a room full of friends and strangers (if you can)

Call to Action:  My hope is that you all have a great Christmas this year.  Even if past ones have not been worth remembering, I hope this one is.  Be with the ones you love.  Make sure to let them know how much you appreciate their being a part of your life.

How Pixar and Disney Help Me Appreciate Different Cultures

Let me start by saying I don’t come from a distinct cultural background.  As far as I know, my families on both sides came from European immigrants (that’s really a best guess).  So I don’t have much to work with when it comes to traditions or heritage that I use to identify with.  What’s interesting though is I have a continuing growing interest in different cultures.

Writing fantasy is the perfect outlet for me to be creative and create new cultures and peoples, coming up with languages, cuisine, fashion, traditions, holidays, religions, etc.  All of these require some foundation of how cultures develop and evolve over generations.  Some are forgotten while others are passed on from generation to generation with little change occurring.  For example, language in the United States is constantly evolving through pop culture and technology.  A hard drive back in 1940 is not necessarily the same thing as it is now.  However, in Iceland and other countries, language has remained mostly unchanged (see https://theculturetrip.com/asia/india/articles/the-10-oldest-languages-still-spoken-in-the-world-today/).

My interest in cultures (both fictional and real) has been bumped by Pixar and Disney’s recent push to explore times and places otherwise not touched in their expansive catalog.  We have Brave and Coco (Pixar) and Frozen and Moana (Disney).  I’m going to be honest here.  I really enjoy all of these films (most of all Moana, which my wife likes to tease me about).  Why do I like them?  Because you can tell the filmmakers truly wanted to explore the cultures of these peoples and introduce them in a celebratory way.  I can’t help but be drawn to this aspect of storytelling.

In my own writing and those of fantasy books I enjoy, I love how cultures (mind you made up ones) add a layer of reality to the story that pulls me in and keeps me engaged in the story.  There’s beauty and intrigue to be shown.  As we often see in the Pixar and Disney examples, it’s heritage and tradition that drive the protagonist to see their goal completed.  A theme I often explore is identity and there’s a great focus of pride in identity when it comes to these characters and where they come from.

For a guy (myself) that feels left out when it comes to heritage and culture, I love to immerse myself in these places and peoples who have vibrant traditions founded by their ancestors.  I love seeing these stories celebrated and shared with greater audiences because the diversity of the world is worth noticing.

Call to Action: It should still be in theaters, so I encourage everyone to go see Coco.  It’s a great film about family and the importance of remembering those who came before us.  You can’t go wrong.

Flash Fiction: A Boon of Opportunities

Old sweat and bubbling stew filled the abandoned farmhouse with their potent presence as the circle of mercenaries let a lull step between the lines of discussion.  There was a third scent and Chasiel, the Bloody Dove, could practically bite into it.  Anticipation.

“So,” said the lean and gray-haired man to her right, “you think it’s likely?”  Half his face bore the scars of a burning accident when he was a young man.  Whatever his real name was, Chasiel did not know it.  He had only ever been called Crisp to her knowledge.

Crisp’s question was not directed towards her but to the bull of a man across from her.  Feller Crowne held the honor of longest tenured among the miscreants making up the dozen or so Shivering Souls.  “Without question,” Crowne said in his high voice, famously unexpected to those who first met him.

Fenroe, to Chasiel’s left, was next to speak.  “Breshtk is broken.  Good opportunity to get our fingers in there and feel around.”

Chasiel smiled, knowing Fenroe could not help himself and his knack for using colorful phrases in any situtation.  He would try to make his grandmother blush if given the opportunity.  Chasiel took the small piece of kindling and set its end into the flames of the cook fire, eyes mesmerized by the flickering flames.

Crowne coughed.  “I care more about seeing who comes out alive once the dust of this hell storm settles…  The Holds may turn on Breshtk but it’s not weak.  Not in the least.  As long as Wielders live and Ki’Tanil, bastard fool that he is, breathe, Breshtk can come out of this mess.  Chasiel,you’re too quiet?”

She had kept silent, biding her time.  The constant talk of Breshtk and whatever nonsense the kings and queens of the Holds were bickering about had gotten bland on her tongue.  What did interest her however were opportunities to go unseen where otherwise eyes would be watchful for sell swords.  The sound in her throat preceded her words.  “The Silver Way had the contract and now we have it.  This noble of Teras expects mercenaries.  We can mimic that stupid symbol of the Silvs and do what we please once we’re sent on our merry task.”

“A boon of opportunities,” Fenroe said before whistling.

Crisp took the handle of the stirring spoon in the cookpot and blew on the creamy meal.  Crowne rubbed at his eyes after some smoke invaded the brown orbs.  “A boon perhaps but still a damn risk.”

Chasiel agreed but preferred to think of it as more than opportunities to take gold out of the pockets of the Teras coffers.  No, for her, she saw a window to hamstring the noble bastards who continued to play their privileged game.  After she inhaled the segda smoke from her pipe, her namesake throat sound followed, serving as the reminder of her rage.

Reviewing the Punisher

posted in: Film/TV, Review | 2

Gut punch.  That’s what it felt like to watch and experience Netflix’s The Punisher Season 1.  Before I go into my review and impressions of the show, I need to say this is not a show for everyone.  Definitely not for kids and probably not for some adults.  If brutal scenes of violence are not your cup o’ tea, then don’t drink.

We got our first dose of the vigilante antihero of Frank Castle aka the Punisher in Netflix’s Daredevil Season 2.  He’s a mysterious figure fit with an arsenal befitting a small army who crosses paths with our friendly blind lawyer Matt Murdock aka Daredevil.  The latter doesn’t kill, feeling morally and spiritually convicted by his choices to fight crime whereas the Punisher pulls the trigger first, contemplating morality after the fact.

Actor, Jon Bernthal, gave a performance as Frank Castle that took everyone by surprise.  There have been previous feature film adaptations of the Marvel skull-symbol wearing badass.  Those have been somewhat true to the source material but lacking in impact.  Bernthal gives us a full drenching that embodies the Frank Castle of the comics.  He’s a US Marine vet whose family is murdered as collateral damage depending on the origin story of the comic run.  In all though, Frank’s birth as the Punisher is consistent.  He loses his family, battles the guilt and pain of losing them, and takes on a personal code to eliminate those responsible and any other scumbag who may cross his path.

The themes in the Punisher (I’m talking both broad and in the Netflix show) center around vigilante morality, PTSD, grief, etc.  The show does this extremely well.  The first season fully features Frank as he searches for those involved in the deaths of his family after he learns that the CIA is behind some shady practices involving drug running and assassinations.  All throughout his mission, he is faced with questions of right and wrong, family, healing, and justice.  His interactions with friends and allies help ask questions and explore these themes, making the viewer question if rooting for Frank is just or not.

I’ve watched all of the Netflix Marvel shows up to date and the Punisher is by far my favorite and I think the strongest entry in the growing catalogue.  The acting and plotting are superb and where I think the other series’ wane and struggle is weight and believability.  The Punisher is visceral (such a good word).  You feel the impact of every emotion, punch, and bullet impact.  There are no “superpowers” in this show which helps it immensely.

As I said before, this show is not easy to watch.  The violence goes where other shows do not.  It’s rough but true to the comic and character of Frank Castle.  What the film, Logan, started is a trend to see these superhero properties move from a place of PG-13 action to one that makes us feel the weight of the choices and lives of these people.

Call to Action: So while I highly recommend this show, be advised.  Try out the first few episodes and see if it’s something you can handle.

To Doubt is to Progress


Let’s dive in.  As I get closer to finishing my recent revision of So Speaks the Gallows, the creeping whispers of self-doubt interrupt the process.  These are not words of castigation but instead subtle pricks of critique that make my hands pull away from the keyboard and seriously consider the words on the page.

Revising is difficult.  You think just writing a full novel is hard, try going back over what you’ve spent years shaping and being excited about and then questioning why entire sections come across as borderline tissue paper in strength.  You wish it was more than single ply but instead, you get this thin sheet that could disintegrate at the first sneeze.

No, I have not given up and I have not put my toes over the ledge to look down into writer’s oblivion.  (It would take a lot for me to reach that point of disappointment.)  I think I’ve simply come to a section of the book where I’m not impressed with the writing (granted it’s my writing).  I know I am more than capable of girding up the paragraphs and dialogue where it suffers most but I find myself wondering about the strength of the writing as a whole.

What if the beginning is strong but it begins to wane and lose its clout the further we go to the right towards that back cover?  It’s an honest question and, I think, a natural one to explore.  Maybe it’s strong enough in the beginning to hold up any weaker sections.  Maybe an agent will get to these weaker sections and say, “Well, this needs to be reworked but I think you’re more than capable of doing it.”  These are the questions that like to poke at my confidence each time I return to revise.

As I’ve said, I’m okay with rewriting entire chapters (I actually did rewrite the first five chapters and feel they are extremely strong now) but I wonder if I should do it now or simply try to fix the weaker prose as is.  Either way works to be honest.

All this is to say doubt is a very natural and, I think, healthy emotion to go through as an artist.  For me, it keeps me in check and forces me to look back at certain sections of my book and ask questions like, “Can this be better?”  Most of the time the answer is a big fat “Yes!” and so I need to be willing to strip down the prose and rework.

So to any of my fellow artists who lay awake or stare blankly at the page or canvas, do not become bitter or agitated.  Embrace the pain of being mediocre (only at times, not always) and let creativity fizzle and reset.  I have no idea if this is sound or good advice but I know it works for me.

Call to Action:  Here’s a fun exercise to consider when in doubt, ask some simple questions and answer as truthfully as possible.

1)  Why do I have this sense of doubt in my work or abilities?
2)  Is there truth to this?  If not, what is the lie behind it?
3)  What can I do to strengthen confidence in myself again?

Try these out and see where it gets you.

On This Day – 18 November 1985 – Calvin and Hobbes First Published

My first exposure to Calvin and Hobbes came when I was probably around thirteen years old at my grandparent’s house.  My grandpa had recently received or bought one of the collection books and had it on the living room table.  I picked it up and was pulled into the world of the precocious six year old and his imaginary best friend/stuffed Bengal tiger.

Suffice to say, Calvin and Hobbes will always remind of my grandpa.  I have great memories of growing up and creating outlandish scenarios with him (his imagination was just as a vast a child’s).  This coincides with my love for Calvin and Hobbes because the comic strip is more about imagination than it is about a misbehaved child.  Just peruse the examples I’ve included in my post.

As a thirteen year old (I’ll remind you I was not reading a whole lot during this time of my life), I naturally gravitated more to the pictures and art of comic strips to understand Calvin’s current escapade.  As I grew up though, I began to read beyond the more minimal scenarios and found a great intellect and wonder in the kid.  His alternate personas (Spaceman Spiff, Tracer Bullet, and Stupendous Man) exemplified my own imagination as I played with action figures and created several different characters and worlds faced with conflict (a precursor to my days of writing).
We’ve been blessed with ten years of Calvin and Hobbes by the great Bill Watterson.  I continue to revert back to the comic strip whenever I need a quick laugh.  In my mind, there is no better cartoon strip for children and you can bet my kids will be introduced to it at a young age.
Call to Action: What are your memories of Calvin and Hobbes?  I’d love to know how others first encountered the strip and how it has affected them in life.  Also, check out the great documentary, “Dear Mr. Watterson,” if you can find it.  It’s a great exploration of the comic and its creator.

Truth of Evil

posted in: Life | 2

I’ve been struggling for about a week now thinking about how to proceed with this blog.  It’s my blog and I can’t say for sure who reads it all the time (aside from family and close friends).  However, I am very conscious about what I want to write about and how to provide content that I think is worth posting and reading.  If I had it my way, I’d love to stick to writing tips, movie/tv reviews, etc.  That would be fun and hopefully entertaining to not just me.  Unfortunately, I am very present in the happenings of the world and cannot continue to keep those things from my thoughts and furthermore from my blog.

Now, I have stated in the past that I have no interest in debating or converting based on my personal views.  They are “my” personal views based on my experiences, beliefs, and understanding.  This also means I do not think I cannot learn more and have these views changed based on evidence and conviction.  Let’s jump in the heap!

Evil is very real.  In fantasy, we have great extremes manifested in forms like Sauron, Voldemort, and for you Wheel of Time fans, the Dark One.  All of these represent the deepest of antagonists to our literary heroes: Frodo, Harry Potter, and Rand al’Thor (again, Wheel of Time reference.  I am purposely avoiding the Game of Thrones example, ha!).  These forces represent the main conflict and must be destroyed in order to assure peace to not only our heroes but the world they live in.  This puts a lot of weight on the story and we as readers only want to see the evils defeated by the end.

A common element in fantasy right now is the use of grey characters who have both vice and virtues equally.  These are men and women we can both trust and revile depending on the situation.  Part of me enjoys these characters because I think they are complex and better represent real life people.  No one can say they are completely good, having no drop of selfishness, anger, hate, etc.  And while these kinds of characters can be fresh and enjoyable to read due to their unpredictability, I personally expect to see consequences for their choices.  Otherwise, we’ve run into another issue entirely.  Consequences whether good or bad represent reality and realism should be woven throughout the tapestry of the story (even more so in fantasy).

Coming back to the reason I am writing this post, I do not think I should be silent on the evil seen in the last weeks of various independent acts throughout the States.  Las Vegas, New York, and Sutherland, TX.  I am not going to go into the details of each situation.  If you’ve paid attention even a little bit, then you know the basics: men took it upon themselves to kill innocents.

My heart is broken at the moment.  I take days to process the full weight of these things because I don’t find it healthy to react instantly.  My heart breaks for those affected.  Families and friends have lost loved ones unexpectedly and for reasons they cannot fathom as they grieve.  There’s been a lot of hubbub about people offering prayers and thoughts to these people whose worlds have been turned over. I sincerely say and express these words because I sincerely believe there is power in prayer and thought directed at the healing of pain and grief.  If you don’t, that’s fine.  I would not hold that against you and would hope you would not hold my beliefs against me.

What we’ve witnessed is evil (plain and simple) and if we can draw anything from these recent horrifying events, it’s that no matter the method or tool used, evil will find a way to exact its violence and chaos.  I’ve been asking myself what can be done to keep these things from happening but after days of contemplation I am truly not convinced legislation cannot stop it.  So long as evil’s influence and madness can burn in the hearts of people, methods and tools can be improvised upon (gun, knife, vehicle, they all do damage).

For myself, at this moment in time, I come to a place where I think more than ever, we need to be vigilant about being aware of evil.  How?  By the signs it effuses.  If you’ve ever taken any kind of Active Shooter Training for a workplace environment, then you are told what to look for.  Changes in behavior are often there.  Now, I know there are likely outliers (there always are) but all too often, evil and its signs can be seen and recognized.  But we have to be willing to pay attention and speak up when noticed.  More and more, after these horrifying acts of evil and violence, we learn after the fact that there were “red flags” and yet no one acted.

I understand that many will say this is not enough and that legislation needs to be implemented to prevent further incidents but I am not convinced of that yet.  I’m not saying some legislation could not help because I think it could, but I have to posit the question: can legislation prevent evil from being enacted?  No.  It just can’t.  Time and time again, those who wish to do others harm will do so in any which way that they can.  History testifies to this.  Good standing citizens, however, can and are more than capable of interceding and preventing evil if we are willing to pay attention to those within our communities.

I am demanding this of myself.  It’s obvious safe places no longer exist.  Churches, concerts, sidewalks.  If these horrible acts of evil can teach us anything, it’s that we need to be paying attention to the world around us more.  Take an interest in your family, friends, coworkers, and acquaintances.  I have to hope that doing so will in some way prevent more evil from being carried out.

Call to Action:  Don’t react out of emotion when these horrible acts of evil happen.  I only say this because I see it every day.  So many react without taking a moment to ask questions.  Reach out and talk to someone you trust and work through whatever emotions have stirred up.  Adding to the vitriol does nothing to propel us forward, instead setting us back.

Stranger Things: Rewatch Final Thoughts

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Review | 0

I won’t go into further rehash of the first season of Stranger Things (I’ve exhausted that enough, I think).  I apologize if those first few episode posts were too play-by-play also.  I wanted to avoid that but felt I needed to call out a lot of important moments and details as we moved deeper into the story.

With the first season finished and moving into season 2, I think this show was primarily successful due to several factors.  The nostalgia and call backs to our favorite 80s pop culture memories definitely act as a foundation but I think to recognize the direction, production, acting, and storytelling of the show is equally important.  The show never feels like a parody of the decade but instead, it’s a heavy hitter in its own right that could have been developed and given to us by Spielberg himself back in 1983.

Much like the recent IT movie, the child actors kept this experience grounded.  They are not only great actors but they represented what early 80s preteens were (based on my memory of older kids).  I feel that I could safely argue that without their stellar performances and believability, the show would have been sub par.

Looking forward, Season 2 has a lot to live up to but if we are to go by the trailers and clips released, I think this show will continue to be strong (I’ve also heard good things from people who’ve seen early screenings of the first few episodes).  It will delve deeper into the characters and their struggles having to adjust to the incidents and experiences of the first season while opening ways into more mysteries and oddities that we love and cannot wait to experience.

Part of me is curious as to how they will keep up the nostalgia without touching upon the same ones they’ve already referenced.  Some that I noticed based on the info we’ve been given, we can expect Ghostbusters, Mad Max, Dragon Lair (the arcade game), and even Michael Jackson (Thriller primarily) all to come into play.

What to expect from me regarding Season 2 is most likely a review after I’ve seen all the episodes.  Whether or not I do another rewatch for next year (as far as I know, there will be a season 3), I haven’t decided yet but I’ll definitely consider it.

In all, this was a fun month of blogging.  A bit exploratory and experimental but still enjoyable.  I’m not sure there’s another show I would want or be able to this type of rewatch/review with to be honest.  Netflix has a great format for their tv seasons, keeping episodes at a low number.  Thank you for sticking around and reading.  Hope you enjoyed it and if you did (or didn’t), make sure to leave a comment.  I’d love to see more activity here on the blog and interact with everyone!

Call to Action: Check out the awesome Season 2 trailer below!

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 8

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Review | 2

The Upside Down

Recap:

We’ve come to the last episode finally!

Joyce and Hopper find themselves separated and questioned by the Lab folks.  Brenner does his best consolable routine and Joyce ain’t buying it.  Meanwhile Hop is getting the less than cordial treatment and gets the business end of a tazer.  Hop has a plan though.  He makes a deal with Brenner and makes it so he and Joyce can go into the Upside Down to rescue Will.  Brenner tells his people he doesn’t expect them to live and we find out Hop’s deal included telling the Labbies where Eleven is so long as the boys aren’t hurt (not cool, man).  He’s putting a lot of trust in these people but I guess it makes sense so they can get to Will.

Nancy and Jonathan are at the Byers house going full Monster hunting, rigging up traps and preparing for the encounter.  This has shades of Nightmare on Elm Street again as the teens realize they have to pull Freddy Krueger (the Monster) into the real world to defeat him.

While Joyce and Hopper are in the Upside Down, we get our best view of the alternate dimension of Hawkins.  We also get flashbacks of Hop with his daughter, Sarah, and his ex-wife, finding that Sarah got sick unexpectedly and that has taken a traumatic toll on our cop Hop, making him the man he is today.

Nancy and Jonathan draw blood to gain the Monster’s attention and guess who shows up?  Stevo.  Oh, Stevo, do you have the worst timing ever.  He’s there to apologize to Jonathan for being a royal douche and is surprised to find Nancy there too.  Stevo forces his way inside, totally confused and not sure what to make of what’s going on especially when Nancy pulls the gun on him, urging him to leave.  The lights start going crazy and the Monster breaks through the wall.  This is such a great sequence because we get Stevo’s freaking out while Nancy and Jonathan are keeping calm and trying to kill it so Hop and Joyce can navigate through the Upside Down without encountering the Monster.

The Monster leaves but not for long.  Nancy tells Stevo to leave and he does but at his car, he hesitates.  The Monster attacks again and pins Jonathan to the ground, getting a decent supply of Demagorgon saliva on him.  But, we get a great surprise as Stevo returns grabbing a bat with nails pounded through the end.  He swings away and this is when Stevo becomes Steve, redeeming himself completely (at least to me).  The Monster ends up in the hallway, caught by the bear trap where gasoline has been poured.  Jonathan throws in a lighter and the Monster gets roasted (or so we think).

While all this happening, the boys and Eleven are waiting in the middle school.  Dustin continues his win streak, finding hoarded chocolate pudding (isn’t that always the case).  Mike and Eleven share a kiss (awww) but the calm tender moment is short-lived when the Brenner and his cronies show up.  Everything goes full red dawn and the kids are running for their lives.

Back to Joyce and Hop, they are on their way to the Byers house (Upside Down version) when they cross the path of some very ominous egg-like things that look as if something has hatched from them (yep, Aliens reference here.  Thank God there are no facehuggers running around).  They find Will’s fort empty and we get another Hopper flashback that shows us Sarah had cancer.

The Monster is injured from its confrontation with the teens and leaves a trail of blood.  This leads to the middle school in the Upside Down where they find Will cocooned to a wall with something in his throat (gross).  Hopper pulls it out and it looks like some kind of worm/snakelike creature (nope!).  Between more flashbacks where Sarah is dying and attempting to being resuscitated by the doctors, Hopper is doing the same for Will.  The whole sequence is intense but after Will breathes to life, we not only get the great reunion between Joyce and her son but there’s this triumph for Hopper, finding closure and not losing another mother’s child.

We’re not done yet though.  Things intensify at the middle school as the Lab folks catch up with the kids.  Eleven saves them by making many of the baddies die by brain scramble or something (they all bleed out of their eyes and noses).  However, lights flicker and the Monster is drawn to the school.  It shows up and attacks killing many of the remaining Lab folks, including Brenner.  Eleven is extremely weak and the boys take her to a classroom.  The Monster finds them and the boys do what they can as Lucas uses his wrist rocket (again, reminiscent of the Losers Club wounding Pennywise in Stephen King’s, novel, IT ).  As it gets closer, one of Lucas’s shots sends the Monster flying back into the chalkboard.  The boys are surprised and then realize Eleven made that happen.

She holds the Monster against the wall as it fights against her.  She says goodbye to Mike and screams (which my guess is intensifies her telekinetic strength) before the Monster disintegrates into flecks and “ash”.  However, Eleven disappears while this takes place and we are left to wonder what happened to her.

In closing, we get some resolution to the strange events in Hawkins.  The boys are back to playing D&D, finishing a new campaign that may or may not hint at Season 2 happenings (remember the name Thessalhydra).  Will returns to the normalcy of life as “the boy who lived” while Mike is sad, missing Eleven.

Hopper is a hero but it looks like he has dealings with the Lab, though we don’t know to what extent yet.  He takes eggos into the woods, making us think Eleven may in fact be alive.

Steve buys Jonathan a new camera and has Nancy give it to him.  It’s strange to see Nancy and Steve together again but we have to wonder if in the future things change.  It’s hard to imagine Nancy and Jonathan not ending up together at some point.

Will is the boy who came back to life.  But things are not as they seem.  During a Christmas dinner, he goes to the bathroom to wash up and he coughs up smoe kind of slug-like thing into the sink and the environment around him flashes to the Upside Down, leaving us to wonder…

Things are in fact NOT back to normal…not at all.  But we won’t find out anything until October 27th!!!

Reaction: Lots to say about this episode but I’ll keep it short and concise.  Any time we get a final episode of a season, we know there are character resolution, answers provided, and possibly new questions offered.  We get all of that in this episode.  The biggest questions however are, I think, the most important things we’re left with.  First, is Eleven alive?  And second, what is happening to Will?  The latter is key to the future of the story because the tear into the Upside Down has obvious affects on Will since he was exposed to it for so long.  What does that mean for him?  What does that mean for Hawkins?

80s Refs: Aliens, A Nightmare on Elm Street, D&D, IT

Call to Action: I hope you enjoyed this month of returning to Season 1 of Stranger Things.  I enjoyed writing these posts a lot and hope my format was pleasing to readers.  My CTA is to rest and get ready for season 2 which will be released on the 27th.  I have a final thoughts post coming that day as well.  Keep on the lookout!

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 7

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Review, Storytelling | 0

The Bathtub

Recap:

We get a sweet moment between Mike and Eleven, finding there are growing feelings there.  Then comes Dustin to ruin their preteen romance in hilarious fashion.  No time to laugh though as they hear Lucas frantic on the other end of the walkie talkie.  They can’t figure out what he’s saying until they finally hear him say the bad men are coming.  Out the window, Mike and Dustin see vans fast approaching.  On their bikes they flee with Eleven and while we get some great action and tense moments, you can’t help but think that infamous sequence in E.T. when Eliot and his friends are riding their bikes to keep E.T. out of the hands of the government.

Then as they think they’ve escaped capture, another van turns the corner in front of them, blocking them off.  Then Eleven makes their bikes fly over the van!  Except she doesn’t!  No, instead we get our expectations subverted and Eleven launches the van over them, making it land upside down on the street to block off the pursing vans.  Another great iconic moment from this show!

The boys and Eleven get to the junkyard and hide out. Lucas joins up and apologizes to Eleven. Friends again!  As helicopters fly overhead, Lucas tells them what he saw at the Lab and they determine the gateway to the Upside Down must be there.

Hopper and Joyce show up to the police station to get Jonathan, learn from the bully whose arm was broken that Eleven is with Nancy’s brother and the group comes together.  Jonathan and Nancy explain why they have the monster hunting gear.  They all go to the Wheelers, see the Hawkins Lab folks there and then go to the Byers house to locate the boys, grabbing Will’s walkie talkie and reaching out.

We get a good moment of Stevo tired of his goober friends, ditch them, and go to the theater to help wash off the marquee.  Good on you Stevo!

Nancy makes contact with Mike on the walkies and after some back and forth, Hopper does enough to convince them to tell him where they’re at.  Somehow, Labbies show up with tranquilizer guns and just as they are about to find the boys and Eleven hiding out in a bus, the Unstoppable Hopper shows up with his fists of fury!

Everyone’s finally together (whew! It’s taken awhile) at the Byers house and after they catch each other up, Eleven tries making contact with Will or Barb in the Upside Down.  It doesn’t work and she eventually realizes she needs more than a walkie talkie.  She needs water.

Dustin comes through again when he calls Mr. Clarke, who is on a date watching John Carpenter’s The Thing (another 80s horror/sci-fi classic!), and asks about sensory deprivation.  Getting the details, they all head to the middle school to set up a kiddie pool and fill it with 15,000 lbs of salt.  Yay science!

Eleven goes in the water, floating and entering the blackness.  There, she finds Barb’s body and then finds Will hiding in his fort in the Upside Down.  After she returns from the blackness, Hop has a plan to enter the Upside Down to find Will.  Joyce goes with him where they get instantly caught by the Hawkins Lab security after getting onto the grounds.  Meanwhile, Nancy is saddened by Barb’s death and tells Jonathan she wants to finish what they started and kill the Monster.

The boys and Eleven hang out at the school and before the episode is over, we see Will in his fort and hear the Monster close by before the wall explodes and we’re left wondering what happens.

Reaction:  Another solid episode that really rides the emotion of our main characters all finally coming together.  The van launch by Eleven in the beginning is definitely a high point.  We want to see our “heroes” succeed and find Will.  Barb’s death is one of those series deaths that bummed out a lot of watchers.  She seemed to have become an instant favorite despite not being in the show very much.

80s Refs: E.T., The Thing

Call to Action:  I want to say The Thing should be revisited.  It’s a weird, crazy sci-fi flick that is in a lot of ways iconic.  I saw it as a teenager and while the practical effects don’t hold up in many cases, for the time, it was a very well done film.  Totally up to you if you want to watch it but if you’re a fan of 80s classics and haven’t seen it, you should set aside two hours, turn off the lights and chomp on some popcorn.

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 6

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Review | 0

The Monster

Recap:

We pick up right where the last episode left off with Jonathan looking for Nancy while she crawled into the Upside Down.  Their calling out to each other, voices all weird and distant, while Nancy is hiding from the Monster.  Just as Jonathan comes across the hole in the tree, Nancy’s hand bursts out for a pretty good jump scare that got me (I feel like I should have called out some of these jump scares in previous episodes.  My bad).

Stevo and his gang of jerks are driving to Nancy’s house so he can see her but upon looking through her window, he sees Jonathan on the bed with her and jumps to conclusions.  Nancy is definitely traumatized by the experience in the Upside Down and the Monster so she asks Jonathan to stay and we get some funny awkwardness between them (I seriously have to ask where her parents are at because this is twice that she’s had guys in her room at night).

In the morning, Jonathan wakes to find Nancy looking at a kids book of animals–predators to be exact.  She tells him how she thinks the Monster has predatory tendencies and makes the connection between the it and being drawn by blood (we’ve known this since Barb was taken but the injured deer gives further proof).

 

Hopper shares his findings with Joyce and when he mentions the kid’s room in the Lab, Joyce asks if a drawing on the wall was “good” because we’ve seen in some flashbacks that Will’s got a decent artist’s touch.  Hop eventually comes back to the story he read about Terry Ives (remember her?) and that she claimed to have had a daughter taken by Dr. Brenner.  More investigative work and Hop gets an address.  He and Joyce drive to Terry’s sister’s house to talk to Terry but find she is not all there after years of drug use.  Some background information from her sister reveals that Terry was pregnant when she was a test subject for Brenner.  We get a direct mention of Stephen King from Terry’s sister, which makes me think of Carrie or Firestarter, which are two stories about girls with telekinetic powers.  They leave without much else to go on.

There’s a quick scene with Mr. Clarke being visited by the lady who killed Benny back in episode 1.  Don’t worry.  Our favorite science teacher is not harmed but we know the Hawkins Lab folks are on the trail of the boys and Eleven.

Dustin is the voice of reason, doing his best to bring peace between Mike and Lucas.  As boys do, they fight and make up.  At Lucas’s house, he listens to Mike and Dustin but he’s not willing to search for Eleven ahead of searching for Will.  So while Dustin and Mike set out to find Eleven, Lucas goes on a solo mission, looking for the gateway to the Upside Down to find Will.

A flashback of Eleven going back into the sensory deprivation tank, assured by Brenner she can’t be hurt, is cut off when she wakes in the woods.  She goes to a nearby grocery store, steals some eggos and causes a scene as the store manager tries to confront her.

 

Jonathan and Nancy are at a surplus store and buying all kinds of supplies including: gasoline, ammo, and a bear trap (all the things you need).  They tell the clerk they are going monster hunting, which is such a good line and moment.  As they’re leaving, someone drives by telling Nancy they can’t wait to catch the movie.  Nancy rushes to the nearby theater and finds that someone spray painted her name and a less than cordial term.  She finds the perpetrators, Stevo and his cronies, in an alley and confronts them.  Jonathan shows up and eventually a fight between him and Stevo ensues.  Jonathan is the clear winner and we get a great Karate Kid moment where one of Stevo’s friends tells Jonathan that Stevo’s “Had enough, man!” (Cobra Kai!)  The cops show up and Jonathan and Nancy get taken to the police station.

This episode finishes strong.  Lucas is off on his solo adventure only to come to the fence line of the Hawkins Lab where he sees military personnel on the facility grounds.  Meanwhile, Mike and Dustin are on their bikes, come across the grocery store Eleven just made a scene at, and immediately figure she had something to do with the cops there.  The mouth breathers (the bullies) show up and the boys are forced to run, eventually ending up at the quarry.

One of the bullies has a knife and catches up with Dustin (this reminds me of Henry Bowers in IT and the horrible act he commits against Ben).  The bully tells Mike to jump off the ledge and into the quarry lake or he will hurt Dustin.  Mike complies because he’s just a good friend.  He jumps, shocking them all but when they rush to the ledge, they find Mike suspended in air.  He rises up and we find that Eleven has come to save the day!  She knocks one of the bullies over and breaks the arm of the knife wielding mouth breather (so satisfying…is that bad?).

 

As Mike, Dustin, and Eleven have themselves a group hug, she tells them she thinks she’s the Monster and we get a flashback where she finds the Monster in the blackness facing away from her.  She approaches it from behind and eventually touches the Monster, drawing its attention to her.  Everything in the lab goes crazy and we realize that this action caused the rent in reality.  Her making contact opened the gateway in the lab basement! What?!?!

Reaction: A solid episode once again (I don’t think there’s one that’s not necessarily fast moving, progressing the story).  I remember the revelation of Eleven’s touching the Monster in the blackness causing the gateway to be very satisfying.  I just liked that it was that simple.  Brenner was playing with fire and brought this phenomenon to the real world.  It’s a solid story plot element that doesn’t “reach” and the fact that Eleven thinks she’s the monster is heartbreaking and a great character moment for depth.

80s Refs: Carrie, Firestarter, Karate Kid.

Call to Action: Just because, go back and watch Karate Kid.  Such a classic.  Sweep the leg!

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 5

posted in: Fantasy, Film/TV, Review | 0

The Flea and the Acrobat

Recap:

We’re half way through season 1!  I really consider this episode to be the turning point.  At least for me, it was here that the show took a turn that I wasn’t anticipating and it was for the good.

Hopper breaks into the Hawkins Lab accompanied by some epic synth. You kind have to wonder what his background is before Hawkins because he’s got a knack for sleuthing about.  Security eventually catches up to him at a locked door but you can’t stop the Hop!  He punches his way to gain access through the door and finds himself in a quarantined area where there’s a room that’s clearly a kid’s room.  Security is on his tail though and he takes the elevator down in to the basement where he gets a big eyeful of the portal on the wall before being knocked out.

 

Joyce is being “comforted” by Lonnie and we can quickly tell this guy’s up to no good.  He tries telling Joyce she’s grieving from Will’s death and she’s delusional.  Jonathan comes home to find the house in more disarray and Joyce’s recent axing of the wall doesn’t shake him as we might expect now that he’s leaning towards believing her.  We get a quick exchange between Lonnie and Jonathan where Lonnie tells Jonathan to remove an “Evil Dead” poster from his wall because it’s “inappropriate” which I find humorous and poignant as it’s a classic film about evil crossing into the real world.

The boys and Eleven are back in Mike’s basement discussing what they heard Will say over the ham radio.  Two distinct descriptive things were that he was in a place “like home” only it was “dark”.  Eleven tells us what that means by saying “upside down”.  Still confused, Mike recalls Eleven flipping the D&D board and placing Will’s wizard figurine and the Demagorgon on the black field.  Dustin, whose much smarter than people give him credit for, calls it the Veil of Shadows and gives us an explanation of a bleak and desolate place that mirrors the real world (sound familiar?!).

Will’s funeral takes place and then a wake and while the majority of the attendees are sad and grieving, we see all our main players putting on a show because they know or at least are convinced Will is not dead.  Jonathan and Nancy are especially not interested in the event, steal a gun from Lonnie’s glove compartment, and prepare to search Mirkwood, believing the sightings of the monster will lead them to find “something” that will help them locate Will and Barb.

We get my favorite part of the episode when the boys find Mr. Clarke and ask him about alternate dimensions.  Always willing to teach, Mr. Clarke explains to them the metaphor of the flea and acrobat, explaining how an acrobat can only go backwards and forwards on a tightrope.  A flea, however, can go along the sides and upside down (wink wink) on the rope.  The boys ask how they can do what the flea does and Mr. Clarke explains that a lot of energy would be needed or in this case a doorway or gateway would need to be opened in order for them to access that point of entry.  Such a portal would mess with the gravitational field of the real world and the boys have their lead!

Hopper wakes up in his place, not knowing how he got there.  He goes full paranoia and begins searching for a surveillance bug, breaking, ripping, and cutting his way until he finds one in the ceiling light.  His deputies show up to tell him more people have gone missing in Mirkwood and that Barb’s car was found at the bus station.  Something stinks like last years gym clothes…

Joyce finds some legal paperwork that looks like Lonnie wants to cash in on suing the quarry company for negligence and Joyce’s suspicions are confirmed.  She kicks his butt out of the house.  Hopper shows up later, telling Joyce to say nothing.  They check the Christmas lights (all of them apparently) and find no bugs.  After the all clear, Hop tells her he’s being watched. He tells her he went to the morgue and “Will’s” body was fake. She was right the whole time!  Hop’s on the scent.

 

The boys try to explain the flea and the acrobat to Eleven but she doesn’t know where the gateway to the Upside Down is.  Led by Dustin’s testing of compasses, they set out in Stand By Me fashion, following train tracks as they follow the compass.  During this time, we get a flaskback where Eleven is fit with a diving suit and descends into a water tank that reminds me of James Cameron’s Abyss.  Back to the present, Dustin says they made a loop, cutting through a junkyard and Lucas blames Eleven of sabotaging their efforts, saying he saw her wipe her nose.  Fresh blood on her sleeve confirms she was messing with the compass with her powers and an all out fight ensues between Lucas and Mike.

Eleven uses her power by screaming (eh what?) to keep Lucas from hurting Mike, launching him backwards and hurting him.  Back in the sensory deprivation chamber, Eleven finds herself in a strange place that is all black with water on the ground (not the Upside Down but I’ll call it the blackness).  She finds the man she’s supposed to find for Dr. Brenner and his words transmit into the lab. Next, Eleven hears the Monster, knowing she’s not alone and runs, waking in the water tank.  Lucas comes to and he’s extremely pissed off, storming off.  Mike and Dustin notice Eleven has disappeared and we see our group fractured.

Nancy is in her garage swinging a Louisville Slugger around (choke up, Nancy!) when Stevo shows up.  He’s trying to make amends and asks about Barb but Nancy’s in no mood as she prepares for her and Jonathan’s plans that night.  Not even Stevo’s saying he looks like Tom Cruise and singing Bob Seger’s “Old Time Rock n Roll” will make her budge.

After Jonathan shows us he can’t hit the broadside of a barn with the gun and  Nancy can shoot the wings off a fly, they go off into Mirkwood with some kind of a plan (I’m still trying to figure out what their goal was even if they found Will or Barb).

 

Night has fallen and they come upon a deer that looks like it was hit by a car.  Wanting to put it out of its misery, Jonathan aims the gun but before he can pull the trigger, the deer is ripped away into the brush (one of the better jump scares in the show).  They follow the blood and look around before they get separated and Nancy notices what can only be described as a hole at the base of a tree.  It’s got some oozing grossness happening and like an idiot, Nancy crawls in (watch a horror movie, Nancy!).  Bad idea.  She finds herself in the Upside Down and comes across the Monster chomping away at the deer.  She steps on a branch and the monster jerks around opening its face which is reminiscent of a flower’s petals opening.  But this isn’t your traditional daisy.  No this things got rows of teeth!  We end on that chilling note.

Reaction: This is probably one of my favorite episodes.  The flea and the acrobat metaphor is one of those iconic things about the show and something I think will be relevant throughout the series.  I can’t help but think characters just do dumb things though.  Nancy crawling into the opening at the tree base into the Upside Down is one of those brainless things writers have characters do to move the plot.  I would have written it different. I haven’t had any moments of that so far but this one makes me mad as a writer.

80s Refs: The Evil Dead, The Abyss, any teen horror slasher, All the Right Moves with Tom Cruise

Call to Action: Watch Mr. Clarke’s explanation of the flea and the acrobat.  Such a great moment! (Sorry about the spanish subtitles…)

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 4

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Episode 4: The Body
 

Recap:This is a sad one because we fall into the emotions of Will’s body being found in the lake at the bottom of the quarry.  Hopper does his best to deal with Joyce and her continued downfall into supposed insanity.  She remains convinced she’s talking to Will through the lights.  He uses the loss of his daughter as a means to assure her that she’s grieving and should do so.  The addition of saying the monster with no face coming through the wall (there’s no evidence of this as it looks like the wall “repaired” itself) does Joyce no good either.  Once the cops leave, we see Jonathan dealing with everything in his own way (trapped in music like teens often do) while Joyce is grabbing an axe from the shed, ready to protect herself if the monster returns.

Mike is grieving in his own way down in the basement, pushed further into anger as Eleven sits off in her makeshift tent, messing around with his walkie talkie.  Things change rather quickly though when Will’s voice breaks through the static, singing “Should I Stay or Should I Go?”.  Eleven’s nose bleed suggests her powers go beyond just the telekinesis.

Mike stays home yet again (good thing he has such understanding parents) and reaches out to Lucas.  After some effort, Lucas agrees to get Dustin and bring him over to Mike’s who knows Will’s alive.

Police Chief Hopper is at the morgue and discovers state police performed the autopsy on Will’s body which doesn’t fit and prods his suspicions.  Joyce and Jonathan are there too to identify the body.  Jonathan gets sick and leaves while Joyce asks about a birthmark.  Hop and Jon talk a bit about Joyce and her strength before she storms out, screaming that that “thing” on the observation table is not her son.  We see a heated argument between Jonathan and Joyce out in the street (for all to see!) and they’re at definite odds about the body and what to do next.

The boys are altogether and listening for Will on the walkie talkie as Eleven tries locating him again.  Dustin compares Eleven to Professor X (this kid’s the best with his moments of levity) as she tries to connect to Will but as she’s unsuccessful, they form a plan to take her to their school to use Mr. Clarke’s ham radio.  Paying homage to E.T. once again, we see Eleven dress up like a “normal” girl with a blonde wig and dress in order to break her in.  When Eleven looks in the mirror, you can see the joy in her face as she says she looks pretty, a compliment she gave when first seeing Nancy’s picture.

Things go Poltergeist yet again when the Hawkins Lab folks send one of their own, a guy named Shepherd, into the fungal portal in the basement.  Fit with a retractable steel wire get-up, he goes in and things get weird fast as he runs his hand over the portal opening, tearing away the “gunk” only to see it reform on its own.  He goes through, loses communication with Dr. Brenner on the other side, only to finally report in, be attacked by something, and we never see him again.  All that’s left is the bloody harness at the end of the wire as it retracts.  This sequence also kind of reminded me of Dallas going into the venting system of the Nostromo in Ridley Scott’s “Alien”.  I think if we could have seen Shepherd in the portal dimension, we could have got some good old fashioned suspense!Nancy tells Stevo about seeing a guy with no face in his yard, to which he’s more concerned about the cops investigating and finding they had booze at the party (way to go with those priorities, Stevo).  Nancy leaves him angry and unable to concentrate in class when Hopper’s deputies question her about Barb.  Nancy’s mom is there too and tries to get more information out of Nancy afterwards.  Full meltdown sees Nancy confess she and Stevo did the deed but the more important matter is Barb.  Alone in her room, Nancy puts the torn picture of Barb on the diving board back together and notices something strange behind Barb in the photo.

Copper Hopper puts on his detective garb after talking to the Hawkins mortician about the state police showing up to do Will’s autopsy.  He notices a state trooper on tv giving an interview about finding Will’s body.  Hopper finds the guy in a bar (not sure how but he’s a small town cop with big city cop skills) and strikes up a conversation, gathering info before going to far and spooking the guy.  Outside the bar, Hop uses his fists to get straight answers before noticing a suspicious car nearby and driving off once he goes to confront whoever is in the car.

The boys and Eleven make it to school but can’t get into the ham radio room before Mr. Clarke shows up and promises the boys can use the radio after the school assembly taking place in light of Will’s body being found.  Mike is not happy about the bullies making fun of the situation and confronts them afterward, growing a pair and pushing one from behind.  Before retribution can be delivered, the bully freezes in mid-stride.  Humiliations galore follow when the kid pees himself so the gym full of students can laugh at him.  Mike turns to see Eleven wipe blood from her nose (straight up gangsta!).Jonathan is alone picking out a coffin when Nancy shows up.  She shows him the picture but he’s not sure what the form is standing behind Barb.  She tells him about what she saw at Steve’s place.  Jonathan asks what he looked like and as she struggles to explain, Jonathan completes the description by saying he didn’t have a face.  Connections happening!

They go to enlarge the picture of Barb in the darkroom at the high school and we get some angsty awkwardness between them.  The picture shows the monster and Nancy says that’s what she saw at Steve’s.  They think if Will’s alive (based on Joyce’s claims) then so is Barb.

The boys and Eleven are at the ham radio.  Cue a flashback and Eleven is being told by Brenner to locate a man and relay what the man is saying.  To Brenner’s surprise, the man’s voice comes on over the PA system in the room.  Her nose bleeds yet again and the lights start doing weird things.  This girl just gets the raw end of a childhood, doesn’t she?

All the while, Joyce is blasting The Clash and calling for Will to talk to her.  This is intercut with Eleven doing her thing and Will’s voice coming through the ham radio. The boys call out to him but he doesn’t hear them as he’s talking to Joyce.  She tracks Will’s voice to one of the walls in the house, pulls back the wallpaper and tada!  Will is there behind some pinkish translucent wall.  He says he’s home but its dark and different (different dimension theory coming more and more true).  He runs when he hears the monster is coming.  Joyce goes full Jack Torrence from “The Shining” and takes the axe to the wall but there’s no Will on the other side.  Just daylight.  So, Will’s alive and Joyce and the boys know it to be true.Jump back to Hopper and we see him punch his way to the morgue room where Will’s body is.  Conflicted and maybe somewhat sickened at the idea of cutting open the body, Hopper touches the body, finding something wrong.  He cuts into the chest and finds the body is stuffed with cotton.  Conspiracy alert!  Can’t stop the Hop goes to Hawkins with bolt cutters and begins to make his way through the fence when the episode ends.

Reaction:  There’s a lot happening in these episodes now and you can easily get lost in the craziness.  For me, this episode showcased great emotional performances.  From Eleven’s seeing herself dressed up to Hopper’s struggle to cut into fake Will’s body.  Nothing has to be said in these scenes.  Read the characters and you see so much happening internally.

80s Refs: Poltergeist, The Shining, Stand By Me based on Stephen King’s novella, “The Body”, Alien, Professor X.
Call to Action: The title of this episode, “The Body”, is the same title as a short story written by Stephen King.  Four friends hear about the body of a kid hit by a train and go out into the wilds to find it.  Sound familiar?  Well, it would since it’s the amazing film, “Stand By Me”.  You can find many similarities in the boys of the movie and those in Stranger Things.  There’s this idea of adolescence lost and friendship strengthened that speak volumes.  Revisit it if you have a chance!

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 3

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Chapter 3: Holly, Jolly

Recap:

Poor Barb… We start off with her in a place that looks like a gloomy nightmare, reminiscent of what the xenomorphs do to the colony in James Cameron’s “Aliens”.  There’s strange fungal, creeper vegetation all over like what we see in the basement level of the Hawkin’s Lab.  What’s more is, we can clearly see that she’s trapped at the bottom of an empty swimming pool.  Let’s recall she was taken by the monster while sitting on the diving board of Stevo’s pool.  Interesting…

Something is there with her and we get our first full look of the monster for a brief moment.  Cue Barb’s survival instincts and she does all she can to escape her nightmare situation.  Meanwhile, Nancy is losing her religion to Stevo with Foreigner serenading them.

Again, I say poor Barb because the last we see of her is trying to climb out of the pool and being pulled back in, screaming for Nancy and for help.

 

Jump to Jonathan waking up the following morning and he hears his mom talking to someone, which he thinks is Will.  What does he find instead?  His mom talking to the lights in full belief that Will is communicating with her similar to the adults talking to the little girl through the tv screen static in Spielberg’s “Poltergeist”.The boys got a plan, thinking Eleven knows where to find Will.  Lucas goes on the offensive with supplies, most notably the wrist rocket, which calls back to Stephen King’s IT (the novel).  Dustin, however, is quite the practical one, gathering food supplies, providing some levity in a show that could use quite a bit.

 

We get more levity from Dustin as he asks Eleven to make a toy Millennium Falcon float in the air (reference to Luke Skywalker making the X-Wing levitate in The “Empire Strikes Back”).  She does but only after the boys leave for school.  Alone in Mike’s house, Eleven begins to snoop about, which is what any of us would do–let’s be honest and truthful here.  She goes to the tv and we see her exposed to President Reagan, He-Man, and a Coke Cola commercial that triggers another flashback, showing us her ability to crush a can with her mind but also causing her nose to bleed.Eleven continues to explore and finds herself in Nancy’s room.  There’s a lot happening in this moment as Eleven looks at the life of another “normal” girl.  Lots of emotions are taking place.  She has no idea what it is to be a girl in the real world.

Nancy at school reveals she’s somewhat self-conscious about her night with Steve and also worried about Barb after she doesn’t show up for class or school for that matter.  Jonathan is developing film from the party night, gets caught by another student, and runs off with the pics.  That, however, doesn’t stop Stevo and his friends from finding out, confronting Jonathan and breaking his camera.  Nancy shows up during this, tries to stop it, but fails only to find a picture of Barb on the diving board and taking the ripped pieces, leaving Jonathan to mourn the loss of his camera (maybe don’t be a creeper taking pics of Nancy while she’s changing… yeesh).

Hop the Cop and his deputies go to Hawkins Lab to see what’s going on there.  Hop does the cop thing and gets in to talk to the head of security.  They assure Hopper there’s no way Will came through a drain pipe to access the grounds.  Security cameras show nothing but Hop is suspicious after the video feed does not show the storm of the night they searched for Will.  He knows they’re lying and gets his investigation on.  He goes to the library and goes through old newspaper clippings looking for leads on the Hawkins Lab.  He gets the names of a Dr. Brenner (white-haired Matthew Modine) and a woman named Terry Ives.  More on those two later.

The boys collect rocks at school but not before getting bullied; Mike is tripped, cutting his chin open on the ground.  They catch up with Eleven after school where she learns a new term “mouth breathers” for the bullies who hurt Mike.  Before she leads them to where Will is, Eleven has another flashback after seeing a cat that shows us the Lab folks were trying to get her to kill a cat with her powers.  She refuses, gets hauled off to the dark room but manages to hurt one of the orderlies and kill the other (mental neck snap!), which garner her some affection from Dr. Brenner, which just makes us all hate the guy.

A lamp just isn’t enough.  Joyce decks the inside of the house out with Christmas lights in order to better communicate with Will.  Mike’s mom shows up with a casserole (WHY IS IT ALWAYS CASSEROLE!!!).  And things get creepy as Mike’s younger sister, Holly, walks around the house, following the lights and gets super close to being swiped by the Monster through the wall (that Freddy Krueger in the wall effect is crazy!).  I did not like watching this part.  Too freaky!  But nothing happens to Holly, thank the Lord.

Nancy ditches Stevo and finds Barb’s car where they left it.  She checks Stevo’s back yard–just in case, I guess.  She doesn’t find any sign of Barb but she does get a nice glimpse of the monster before running away.  She’s convinced now more than ever that something horrible happened to Barb.

Coming to the end of the episode, we get a lot of cuts between story lines.  Hopper gets a call while in the library and he hurries off.  Eleven takes the boys to Will’s house leaving them confused while she says he’s hiding there.  They see and hear the sirens of the cops and follow on their bikes.  And Joyce is talking to Will again through the lights (great call back to Close Encounters of the Third Kind and the communicating through lights in the Spielberg classic).


She fashions an alphabet on the wall so Will can spell out words to her and we come to my favorite part of the episode.  Joyce’s talking to Will with the alphabet is one of those things that becomes iconic to the show.  He tells her he’s “RIGHT HERE” which confuses her and then when she asks what she should do, he tells her to “RUN” and she does after the monster manages to burst through the wall this time.  Such a great suspenseful moment!!!

The episode closes however on a very sad, heartbreaking note as the cops and the boys get to the bottom of the quarry to find Will’s body being fished out of the lake.  Mike is furious at Eleven, believing she lied to him while Lucas and Dustin can only try to console their friend.  Hopper is just as defeated as he looks upon the body and knows things have changed dramatically for them all.

Reaction: So I don’t think I can talk about my reaction to this episode without talking about the beginning and end.  Barb’s situation and apparent demise is one of those sequences where you just want more.  She’s in this crazy place that looks like a nightmare inverse of the real world and I want to know more about it.  Then at the end, I have to go with the tragedy of Will’s body being fished out of the bottom of the quarry.  At this point, you want to believe Joyce is indeed talking to Will yet here is his body.  You can’t help but push play to watch the next episode.

80s Refs: Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Poltergeist, IT

 

Call to Action: I want to recommend revisiting Close Encounters of the Third Kind.  I was too young to “get” this movie as a kid but I think if I watched it now, I would appreciate it so much more.  I’ll see if I can track it down online.

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 2

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Chapter 2: The Weirdo on Maple Street

Recap:

The boys bring Eleven out of the rain and into Mike’s 80s kid’s dream room basement.  The interaction is full of humor as the boys try to talk to Eleven and learn what they can.  While Dustin and Lucas think parents need to be brought into the loop, Mike has the decency and good sense to hold off on the notion, directing them all to the possibility that the inclusion of parents would get them all confined to their houses (isn’t it always the case) and no longer able to search for Will.

Also, we should be asking, “Why does Eleven have the tattoo of the number?  Are there ten others who have similar markings?  If so, where are they?”

The next morning Mike snags some Eggo waffles for Eleven, which becomes a staple for her and slightly reminiscent to E.T. and his love for Reeses Pieces.  Most of these interactions with Eleven early on are similar and pay tribute to E.T. with more to come in later episodes.  Mike’s plan to have Eleven sneak out and ask for help is shot down once Eleven convinces him that bad people are looking for her, making the universal gun hand sign very clear to him that she must remain hidden.

This leads to Mike staying home from school where we once again get some great moments between him and Eleven as their friendship grows.  He introduces her to the norms of life and she struggles to understand.  Mike shows Eleven his awesome 80s action figure collection.  These were the best growing up.  Quality, lol, and I was a fan of 80s action figures.  Don’t judge.  When Mike’s mom shows up, he hides her in a dark space which she’s not a fan of and leads to a freaky flashback of her in the Hawkin’s Lab hallway dragged and thrown into a dark room with no explanation while a white-haired Matthew Modine looks on.

Poor Jonathan.  You really start to feel for the kid as Joyce falls deeper into hysteria and what some might call frantic frenzy.  Our favorite Police Chief, Hopper the Copper, shows up with no Will and no belief that Joyce actually heard Will on the other end of the zapped phone.  Tensions rise when she jabs him with another reference to his deceased daughter that hits him hard.

Good Jonathan.  He takes it upon himself to go to his estranged father’s house in search for Will, not wanting the cops to show up, knowing Will could bolt if he sees a black and white pull up.  But first, he goes to school to put up some posters.

Nancy and Barb are at the school and get invited to a party (always a bad sign in 80s slasher flicks) by Stevo.  He and his friends notice Jonathan and prove their cliché douchery by making fun of him while he puts the posters up.  We’re all thinking it: “Let Stevo and his goons be the next victims of the monster!”.  Nancy, however, has a heart and goes to assure Jonathan that everyone wants Will to be found (duh, Nancy, duh).

So, is Jonathan the “Weirdo on Maple Street”?  You get that sense throughout the episode though I missed whether or not the Byers house is on Maple Street or not.  Yeah, he’s awkward and totally shoulders the brunt of responsibility helping his family with finances, going to school, and helping take care of his little brother.  We get another flashback where he is showing Will the Clash’s “Should I Stay or Should I Go”.  Once again, this show (if you haven’t noticed so far) does a great job of establishing characters and their relationships.

Meanwhile Joyce will not be swayed.  She heard Will on the other end of the phone before it was zapped and will do everything she can to make the connection again.  She goes to get a new phone and we find out the Lab folks have been eavesdropping on phone call and get a lead to go to the Byers’ residence where they do shady government work in their trusty HAZMAT suits and are led by Ghostbusters technology to the shed to get positive readings.

(Yeesh… there’s a lot that happens in this episode!  Almost done)

Hopper the Copper and his deputies find Benny’s body in what looks like an apparent suicide (shady Lab folks pulling no punches!) but Hopper’s not convinced Benny would off himself.  After some interviews, he finds that some kid was found stealing food in Benny’s diner kitchen and automatically wonders if it was Will.  It’s inconclusive but Hopper seems convinced Will was there and things just got more drastic.  Eventually, the search party leads them to Hawkin’s Lab.

Back to the boys and while they think Mike is nuts for believing Eleven, they realize she’s more than what she seems when she closes a door with her telekinesis.  Freaked out now, they decide to tread lightly around her but do explain to her what friends are as she continues to try to understand the norms.  This all leads to what is my favorite part of the episode.  She goes to the table where the D&D board sits with their figurines scattered about.  She flips the board over and places Will’s wizard figurine on the black surface of the board and then places the figurine of the Demagorgon alongside Will’s.  I can’t explain the significance of this yet but we will be getting there.

The great intensity and creepy factor of this episode comes full throttle as we return to Joyce, having installed a new phone, gets a call from who she thinks is Will again and is confirmed when he says, “Mom?”.  But then the dang phone gets zapped again!  The Clash goes on full blast in Jonathan’s room which leads Joyce to do what you don’t do in horror movies: investigate the strange thing or sounds coming from another room in the house!  All the while, lights are going nutty in the house and once in Jonathan’s room, something presses against a wall and we’ve got a Freddy Krueger moment!!!  She freaks and runs outside, ready to drive off, but when the music starts up at full blast, Joyce goes full crazy mom and heads back inside.  Fate unknown (for now).

Nancy being the great friend that she is convinces Barb to tag along to Stevo’s totally rad party (come to think of it, there’s only five people at this party so…not really a party).  Shenanigans take place with what you would expect.  We’ve got loud music, shotgunning beer from cans, and jumping in the pool fully clothed.  These 80s good times draw Jonathan to the unfenced yard of Stevo’s house while he is out in “Mirkwood” looking for Will with his camera (why he has a camera in the dark taking pictures, I’ve yet to figure out but you know, be the weirdo, Jonathan.  Embrace it.).

Barb is not having the time of her life and cuts herself badly while taking part in a shotgunning of her own.  Nancy is drenched from the pool and decides to go upstairs with Stevo and partake in some underage coitus.  Jonathan exemplifies his weirdo creeper vibe by taking pictures of all this (why, man, why?!).  Barb is alone and sitting on the diving board of the pool, still dealing with the cut she suffered.  A droplet of blood hits the water which is far too reminiscent of Jaws for my liking.  Something approaches from behind, the Monster, and snatches Barb away.  Jonathan is messing with his camera while this goes down, hears a sound but doesn’t see Barb anymore.

This show is going to end on creepiness every episode, isn’t it?!

Reaction: So my reaction to this episode was vamped to an 11 (no pun intended, lol).  So many great moments for the characters and understanding them better in light of the tragedy of Will’s disappearance.  More mystery enshrouds Eleven, the Hawkins Lab, and whatever else is happening in rural Indiana.

The moments with Joyce and Barb at the end of the episode totally freaked me out.  If you’ll remember from my “Why I Watched IT” blog post, I’m not drawn to horror but man there were some scary intense moments in this episode.  Things pressing against the wall, trying to push their way out are not something I want to see.

 

Best 80s References: Title similar to The Nightmare on Elm Street, Eleven is like E.T., The Clash send us a message.

Great Storytelling Moment: The moments with Eleven and Mike were my favorite in this episode.  Her innocence and naivety are done so well by Millie Bobby Brown and you see the world through her eyes in a way that tugs at the heart.  She has no one and you want to see her protected, while at the same time wondering if she can protect herself with her telekinesis abilities.  She needs friends and family.

Call to Action: Go back and watch E.T.  I admit I haven’t seen it since I was a kid and I need to revisit it.  I do remember the relationship between Elliot and E.T. and the love between them.  True friendship!

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 1

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Chapter 1: The Vanishing of Will Byers

Oh happy day!  We’re here in October with Fall on the horizon and Stranger Things happening.  So here’s how it will go down through the month here on my blog.  I will give a recap of the episode that should not read like a play by play but a “what’s going on here” portion with plenty of my thoughts mixed in.  Then I’ll give an overall thought of the episode followed by a list of my favorite references and maybe even some trivia if its warranted.  The Call to Action will be the last bit of the post.  Hope you enjoy and thanks for reading!

Recap:

We start with some “no namer” running through a creepy lab/hospital-like hallway which makes me think of a scene from Joh Carpenter’s “Halloween” where masked-killer Michael Myers is casually in pursuit of one of his victims.  Our “no namer” gets to an elevator safe and sound about to get away from whatever he’s running from.  We learn quickly what this show is going to be when we hear creepy sounds of what makes me think of gremlins above him.  Then…no more “no namer”.

Strange and creepy.  Here we go!

Meet the boys.  They’re the Goonies, the boys of Stand By Me, the Losers Club, etc.  Except not.  Mike, Dustin, Lucas, and Will are in a basement playing Dungeons and Dragons.  Now, I was not allowed to play D&D growing up.  By the time I could even conceivably sit at a table surrounded by Coke and Dorritos for twelve plus hours rolling dice and collecting hit points, D&D was of no interest to me.  As I grew up, I was told it was forbidden to play for “religious” reasons.  I don’t blame my parents for this line of thinking.  It was pretty common if you were a church-goer in the 80s/early 90s.  (That’s okay, my role playing experiences came later with RPG video games and I preferred those to any game board experiences I’ve had as an adult.)

However, the use of D&D in the show is essential which we will see throughout the series.  There are elements that act as allusion and metaphor but we’ll pause on that for now.  Just remember the name, “Demagorgon”.  It’s important.

This first episode introduces a lot of characters and sets up relationships.  I’ll try to hit on all these as best as I can without becoming droll.

Keeping our focus on the boys (they don’t have a name like the Goonies so I’ll be calling them “the boys” throughout these posts).  The D&D game ends without a resolution to the attack by the Demagorgon and they all leave Mike’s basement to return home for the night.  Things get creepy as Will takes a route home through the woods the boys call “Mirkwood” (Lord of the Rings reference!) but he doesn’t encounter Legolas or some other elven character.  Instead, something tall and lithe is in the road and causes him to crash his bike and run for home.

Whatever the “thing” is, it follows Will and a whole bunch of creepiness happens.  Lights are affected by the presence of the thing (let’s just call it a monster) and Will does the only thing a twelve year old boy should do in this situation: run to the shed and grab a rifle.  However, the monster gets in somehow and the next thing we know, Will is gone.  No scream or nothing.  Just gone.

Cue perfect title sequence! (The synth music here is reminiscent of Carpenter’s iconic Halloween theme.)

More introductions happen after this.  We get our favorite police chief. Hopper. who shows us plenty of things: he likes pills and beer in the morning.  We also get to meet Will’s mom, Joyce (Wynona!), and brother, Jonathan, who realize Will’s gone and that’s not good.  Mike’s older sister, Nancy, and her best friend Barb (#savebarb) let us in on the high school scene and all those fun instances of angst and conformity (I blame the clothes and hair styles personally).

We also see that Nancy, the smart girl, is in a budding relationship with Steve Harrington (whom I will call Stevo), the popular boy, reminding us of John Hughes and most notably “Sixteen Candles”.  More or less, we get a pretty picture of fictional Hawkins, Indiana where things are peachy keen until strange things start happening.  Typical but nostalgically amazing!

Nefarious dealings are happening in the lab we first see at the beginning with the “no namer” as we go back to the Hawkins Laboratory.  HAZMAT wearing dweebs (these guys are always at fault) go to the basement and find spores in the air and nasty, gross fungus-like growths on the walls.  One of these is extra big and pulsating looking far too much like an infected wound.  Gross.

Police Chief Hopper does the appropriate police work and begins to investigate Will’s disappearance at the frantic request of Joyce (she and he have obvious history together).  It takes a while but Hopper eventually realizes this is not a kid who ran off and is hiding somewhere.  He’s gone without a trace.  The search commences and the town begins to band together to find Will.  Also, we are told Hopper had a daughter who died but that remains a mystery.  Joyce and Jonathan do their best to console one another and when the phone rings, Joyce hopes for good news.  Instead, she hears weird sounds, which includes breathing she believes is Will, but before she can get an answer, the phone gets a level-10 electric zap.

And now your star of the show arrives walking through the woods shoeless and in a hospital gown.  Eleven!  This girl’s got spunk.  One kid vanishes and another appears.  We know things are not good for her as she steals food and can unabashedly stop an annoying floor fan with her mind.  Telekinesis powers is always bad-ass.  I don’t care who you are, it would be an awesome super power to have.  Suffice to say, someone, Benny the diner owner, tries to help her and dies in the process but at least she gets away, forced back into the woods while the appropriate 80s cliché of a rain storm hits the night.

Back to the boys and they want to find Will, thinking like boys do, and wonder if the previous night’s D&D game had something to do with his disappearance.  Will had a choice to cast a protective spell against the Demagorgon or cast a fireball.  He chose fireball but his di roll was inconclusive.  This comes off as strange but this is how boys think (trust me).  They go full Goonies and hit the night, enduring the storm on their bikes to look for their lost friend in “Mirkwood” where they eventually run into Eleven!  Episode over.

Reaction: I remember first watching this episode last year and being gripped by it immediately.  There was so much of my childhood wrapped into those 50+ minutes that I had to keep watching.  Also, the music is perfect.  You have to watch the episodes a few times but you truly appreciate the tone of scenes when you focus on the crazy synth sounds produced.

Best 80s References: X-Men 134 (First appearance of the Phoenix that takes over Jean Grey who is a telepath like Eleven), Mirkwood, Goonies, Sixteen Candles, E.T.

Great Storytelling Moment: It won’t come into full affect until later episodes but the use of D&D in Stranger Things Season 1 actually plays important roles as a foreshadowing device.  As a writer, these are the things I love to see utilized and done well.

Call to Action: Here’s the first 8 minutes of the episode for your enjoyment!  If it’s not your cup of tea, then I’d advise against watching the show but you can definitely keep reading my episode rewatch posts!  Far less creepy but plenty strange.

Flash Fiction: “Guarded Offerings”

The melodic voices of the unmarried women of the Ajjuun beat against the outer walls of Hijeneva’s maiden hut.  Per tradition, her peers circled around her dwelling as she sat in silence, examining the gift offerings provided by the unmarried men of the tribe.  They sought to woo the celebrity born from the triumph of collecting the bones of a deceased god.

Baskets lay before her on the collection of cow skins that made up her hut’s floor.  In each of the twenty or so bend-wood woven containers were weapons, supplies, and armor crafted by the men who hoped to be her husband.  The quality of each marked each young man’s value.  She did not know whose name was attached to each basket of gifts.  The anonymity leant itself to the expected surprise of a worthy mate.  So was the Ajjuun way.

Too often, her mind strayed to wonder if Imko was the owner of the basket gift but the tragic death of her friend breached her forgetfulness to give sting to her swollen heart.

Despite the proposals before her—a grand example of her value to the tribe—she was drawn more to the laid out items taken off of the corpse she managed to pilfer in the clearing weeks ago.  The body had been burned and the ruined clothes buried but it was the other items she now possessed that grasped her awe and curiosity.

She did not touch the items but used iron prongs belonging to her father to take each and place them in her hut.  Inside a finely crafted box upon a polished stand, placed in a row were the four shining coins, an armlet fit with a dull gold-colored stone set in it, and a small hand mirror made of silver.

From several feet away, she could sense the power imbued in each item.  The functionality or level of each had not been discovered yet but she would learn the secrets they possessed.  She considered each basket and wondered if the one she chose would serve in the discovery.  Would a potential husband be willing to risk his life to earn her proposal?  The thought gave birth to a smile and a growing plan.

Stranger Things Are Coming

posted in: Film/TV, Review | 0
We’re almost there!  We’re a month out from Stranger Things Season 2 and I have been so excited!  I figured I would take a moment to explain how this is going to work.  Here’s the schedule:

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 1 – 03 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 2 – 06 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 3- 09 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 4 – 12 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 5 – 15 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 6 – 18 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 7 – 21 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch of Episode 8 – 24 Oct

Stranger Things: Rewatch Final Thoughts- 27 Oct

Each post will cover my impressions of the episode from a few perspectives: as a nerd, 80s kid nostalgia, and a writer.

I’ll say here that I love this show.  It hit me in so many ways and I truly felt it was a show made for me and my generation.  I was born in ’84 but watched so many of the movies and tv shows referenced that I completely related.  I remember the technology, music, and culture of the US.

What’s funny is there are elements to the show that I did not understand or experience in that time period growing up but was later drawn to just because I naturally drifted towards those influences by some way or another.  I’ll go more in depth in the episode reviews, of course.  You’ll learn more about me from these blog posts.  That’s for certain.

If you have not watched Stranger Things, then I encourage you to give it a try.  It has some creepiness and definitely crosses into horror/sci-fi at times but overall, the show is a cross between The Goonies/E.T./Alien with many shades of other 80s films.  If it’s not your bag, I don’t blame you.  To each their own.

Call to Action: Brush up on your 80s pop culture!  So many of the references in the show depend on that (at least in my opinion).

Why I Watched IT

posted in: Film/TV, Review, Storytelling | 2

I will start by saying this is not an open endorsement to go and watch Stephen King’s “IT” in theaters.  Instead, I want to explain why I had the desire to watch it.I watched the 1990 miniseries (more like two made-for-tv movies to be honest) back when I was probably close to ten years old.  At the time, it was creepy and definitely had moments that scared me.  However, this was back in the time when tv would edit out a lot of mature things, which is no longer the case.  Nevertheless, the miniseries still had its moments.

The book of “IT” is extremely violent and has some very mature themes that could not be put on tv.  Looking back now, the miniseries has various levels of campiness and the acting is subpar save for Tim Curry’s performance as the iconic clown, Pennywise.  His performance has remained a staple of his career and also in the horror genre.

Twenty seven years later, we are introduced to the film adaption of the novel and it is more true to the book despite many liberties being taken.  The horror and gruesome imagery in the book translate to an R-rated film much easier and the director, Andy Muschietti, did not hold back.  Believe it or not there are scenes in the book that even by today’s standards could not be filmed and put on the screen.  I won’t go into the details but King introduced some troubling things and to this day people are not keen to (as well they shouldn’t).

Now, why did I want to watch this film?  I am in no real way a horror fan.  I have tons of memories of scouring the tv as a kid and finding horror movies (all edited for general viewing, of course) and daring to watch them even though I was not allowed to.  Why?  Mostly because I was curious.  I never had nightmares from doing this but those images do stick with you.  Part of me definitely did it to get the rush of adrenaline one gets but I’m not a junkie for that sort of thing.  I’m more a fan of suspense than horror.

For “IT”, my draw was partly due to nostalgia because I remembered the mini series and I also remember reading in-depth synopses of the novel (I never dared to read it) so I was curious as to how this film was going to turn out.  I paid close attention to the trailers and tv spots whenever they were released and watched them on YouTube and I even watched the breakdowns of these clips.  Again, all out of curiosity more than anything else.  After listening to reviews from multiple critics, I gauged their response to the film as well and the high regards for it tugged at my interest more.  If they had all said it was crap and not worth their time or money, then I’d probably be like, “Eh, maybe I won’t see it then.”  Alas, that was not the case.

When it came time to watch the film, I was apprehensive but knew plenty about the source material and even heard some spoilers that I felt prepared.  Hahaha, I know, I know.  Why watch it then?

I have to say the film is well made and the acting performances by the young actors are spot on great.  Bill Skarsgard’s portrayal of Pennywise the Clown was different than Tim Curry’s previous portrayal and every bit intense and scary.  A very good job.  The creepiness factor is there throughout and at times so subtle that I only knew what to look for because of some of the reviews I listened to.  Some seemed specifically aimed at the theater goers.  Was it scary?  Yes and no.  Was it violent?  Yes and yes.  Was it worth my time?  I think so.

Let me explain why.  As I’ve done this whole writing thing, I’ve been drawn into storytelling no matter the medium.  Whether its movies, television, comics, video games, etc.  If there’s a great story with even better characters, I am interested.  It doesn’t matter the genre either.  I kind of equate my experience watching “IT” to my experience of playing “The Last of Us” which I reviewed in a prior blog post.  “The Last of Us” was an intense experience!  There are so many moments where the intensity of the environment and situation have my adrenaline up and flowing.  If you’ll recall, I loved the experience of the gameplay but even more so the characters of Joel and Ellie.

For “IT”, the kids make the movie.  Yes, Pennywise and all of his eerie creepiness are more spectacle than anything else because he’s a shape shifting other worldly entity of evil that feeds on the fear of children.  What they fear, he becomes, which as you can imagine produced some frightening things.

I think what draws myself and audiences to “IT” is essentially the kids and their banding together to beat this evil that adults cannot see or even sense.  And this threat is very real since we see at the beginning that it preys on children, feeding on them once their fear meets its needs.  There is a very real sense of danger to them and we cannot help but root for their survival and defeat of evil.

Call to Action: Don’t watch “IT” unless it’s your brand of entertainment.  I can honestly say that while I enjoyed the film for some reasons, I don’t feel the need to see it again.  One and done until the sequel comes out (yeah, I forgot to mention it’s a two-parter film as well).

Dealing With Plot Holes

Have you ever been watching a movie, tv show, or even read a book and thought, “Wait what about (blank) or what happened to (blank)?”?  For example, did you ever wonder about why the eagles didn’t just take the One Ring to Mordor and drop it into the lava from on high?  Did you ever wonder why Marty McFly’s parents didn’t recognize him in the present after he impacted their lives back in the 50s?  Oh, and what about Buzz Lightyear freezing like all the other toys when humans come around?  I mean, he thinks he’s a real space marine yet he acts like a toy!  Childhood ruined…  Do these instances drive you crazy?  I can keep going if you’d like.

As a writer, this is something I often have to consider and pay close attention to while I plan, write, edit, and revise.  Early on, it’s easy to write yourself into a corner or come up with a convenient climax to force your main protagonist into success.  This is just another example of growing as a writer to be honest.  Lessons learned is the best way but you won’t get there unless you have some astute beta readers looking for these faux pas.

Thankfully, I’ve managed to find some very good beta readers myself.  In fact, I would actually encourage (I know this is weird but track with me) you to write into your story small and large plot holes (or inconsistencies), making sure you are aware of them and see if your beta readers come across and puts a big giant “?!?!” next to them.  If they do, then I think you’ve established finding a beta reader worth keeping around.  Plus, you can trust they will find the plot holes you’ve glossed over yourself.

Caution/Warning!: Make sure you go back and fix those deliberate mistakes before you send your story to an agent.  Trust me, they will pick up on it and if it’s especially glaring, they will chuck your query in the waste bin faster than a dog scarfing a burger tossed in the dirt.

How do you fix a plot hole?  By writing of course.  It may take some passes but the solution will eventually come to you.  The best thing to do is not feel overwhelmed if it takes a while.  Be willing to sit on it for awhile, letting your creativity go to work while not sitting in front of the screen.  In fact, grab a notepad and write down the plot hole.  Let yourself do some manual writing for a change and see what comes.

I ran into a minor but glaring plot hole in the first chapters of So Speaks the Gallows after my main beta reader brought it to my attention.  I actually had to talk it out with him in order to find the fix.  It was actually a simple solution that didn’t require too much rewriting but it did need to take place.  I’m glad it did because it actually allowed me to add a layer that otherwise would never have been there.  (I’ll reveal what this was later down the road once the book gets published.  I’m planning on releasing some behind the scenes/commentary posts in the future but you’ll have to wait for that.  Hopefully, not too long of a wait.)

Consider plot holes, mistakes, inaccuracies, etc. to be somewhat a natural occurrence if you’re a storyteller.  It will happen because the more complex your story is, the more likely you will forget to consider a plot, setting, or character aspect that will lead to your audience giving you a big red “?!?!”.  Try not to get upset or discouraged by these instances.  Shrug it off and begin the search for the solution.  Once it’s there, insert and revise accordingly.

Call to Action: If you want to seriously treat yourself to some fun plot holes in movies and tv shows, simply go to Youtube and search “plot holes”.  You will not be disappointed.  Avoid the Disney videos though because these will inevitably ruin future watching of your favorite animated films.  But if you’re a diabolical glutton, watch with and then test your children to see how smart they are once they watch those same movies.  See if they have the beta reader/critique knack.

Book Thoughts: Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Something I rarely do (pretty sure I’ve never done it in fact) is finish a book of decent length in a week.  It helps to have 16 hours of driving shotgun from Colorado to southern California though.

Initially, getting in to Ready Player One was easy.  The main protagonist, Wade Watts, introduces himself in first person and quickly begins to describe the world in which he lives and his personal struggles.  Not to get into the weeds of specifics, he lives in a dystopian future that has resolved itself to log into a virtual world called the OASIS.  Here in this virtual world, people forget the trials and hardships of their real life and become whatever they want by creating an avatar and remaining anonymous by using an alternate user name by which celebrity can be attained.

Wade or Parzival (a play on the name Percival), is what is called a gunter (fun word), which stands for egg hunter.  Already, you’re thinking, “Does that mean he’s some kind of chicken farmer in this virtual world?”  No, unfortunately, that is not what he is.  Gunters are those OASIS users who are searching for three keys (copper, jade, and crystal) which will open three gates that will eventually lead them to the Easter Egg hidden within the vastness of the OASIS by its creator.  Whoever finds it, inherits the creator’s wealth and more.  The problem is, it’s been years since the contest to find the Easter Egg was announced and no one has made headway to discover the location of the first key (copper).

There, I have to stop because otherwise we get into spoiler territory.  Honestly, the book is a fun read with plenty of sub context our society can grab a hold of as we become more advanced in our technology and move into this virtual otherworld.  VR technology for video games is getting better by the year and soon enough, I would not be surprised to see us “plug in”.

A major plus in the book for me is the references to late 70s and 80s pop culture.  The creator of the OASIS was a teenager during the 80s and therefore his difficult home life was medicated through the movies, music, video games, and comics of that decade.  I was born in the mid-80s but I have held onto that decade more than I did the 90s when I was an adolescent/teenager.  So many of the 80s references in the book hit home for me.  From classic arcade games to Rush lyrics, I found myself trying to decipher the clues to the keys and gates, thinking of the 80s and what they could mean.

Ultimately though, the characters were spot on.  Wade and his friends were strong and fun to go on the adventure with.  Anonymity is a huge theme in the book.  People perceive avatars through the OASIS but personality comes through despite appearances.  Wade learns this along the way.  There’s this desire to know who his friends are in reality but the fear that to do so might affect their relationships after being “exposed”.  How much do we see in our society today people striving to fix imperfections and form their identity by any means possible?  Identity is a major theme in the book and by the end, I really felt I understood it and was able to think about it on a deeper level.

In closing and here’s your “Call to Action”, give Ready Player One a read.  If your a fan of the 80s and all things pop culture, you’ll get a kick out of the references.  Plus, Steven Spielberg is directing the film adaptation and I can’t wait to see how the movie turns out!

Plot Twists

Something we often look for (it’s probably been ingrained in us ever since reading fiction became a favorite pastime) in a story/plot is the twist–the unexpected.  We love them as an audience.  Our brains and imaginations begin to search for them both on the pages and on the screen.  Why?  Because we love to be surprised.

Warning: There could be potential spoilers in this blog post but they’ll likely be of an “older” period.  So if you see any examples that spoiled the twist, I apologize but have to wonder why you denied yourself the joy of these great stories and then ask why at least your friends and family did not expose you to the light.  Just saying.

A plot twist is an unexpected revelation.  It can be a character moment, setting, theme, etc.  All of these can be stand as the twist but more often than not, it is character-based.  For myself, the essentiality (I wasn’t sure if that was a word or not when I typed it) of a plot twist is necessary in terms of keeping the reader on their toes.  I have read several books over the years that are straight forward and don’t offer any real twist or surprise but rather a simple telling of the story presented that focuses more on the characters and the things they do and learn.  This is fine.  Nothing wrong with it and quite effective.  One that comes to mind (very random but it popped in the ole noggin’) is that of Ebenezer Scrooge in Dickens’ “A Christmas Carole”.  There’s no real plot twist by the end of the story.  Scrooge just experiences some existential trips and learns that this “humbug” ways lack happiness and joy.

However, the big plot twists that we’ve come to enjoy over the years somehow enrich our experiences as partakers of fiction.  The Twilight Zone series is consistent when it comes to twists and people flock to it to see if they can guess what is coming by the end.  Then we have what is probably the most famous cinematic plot twist in that Darth Vader is in fact Luke Skywalker’s father and not just the Sith Lord bent on destroying the Rebel Alliance.  What?!  (If I spoiled that for you…well, it’s time to crawl out of the dark hole and join us sunny folks).

I say all of this in that I personally believe and feel a plot twist should only be employed for the sake of enriching the story of the characters.  A great plot twist is one that shocks the characters we are following as they navigate through their conflicts and goals.  If the protagonist is shocked and undone, then even better is the reader who shares in the revelation!

For myself, I think I write knowing that things will be revealed in due time.  I don’t think of terms of wanting to set up a huge twist.  There has to be natural progression to the story in order for these reveals to work as they should.  I could give some great examples of fantasy authors I respect and feel inspired by but I’d have to play the spoiler.  I’d hate to deny people that joy.  Some really good twists that happen in fantasy can by found in Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn series (I reviewed the first book a while back).  Sanderson does a great job of setting things up and pulling the rug just when you think something obvious is going to take place.

All of this s meant to enhance the reading experience.  There are so many aspects to great storytelling.  Many writers attempt to get there and the opportunity is always there to be grasped.  However, it is a learned art.  Like with so many aspects, including twists and reveals unexpectedly to the reader is not an easy task.  What is disappointing though is when a cheap twist is introduced.  I aim to not utilize this type of trick on the reader.

Call to Action:  Let’s see if I can get a boost of newsletter subscribers.  I’m a few days away from releasing the new one so tell your reader friends.  Thanks!

Story vs Plot: Significant Others

posted in: Fantasy, Storytelling, Writing | 0
Sometimes, as I write, I get lost between the story and the plot I’m telling.  What are the differences between the two?  Are story and plot synonyms to each other?  If not, how do you tell the difference?

I’ll do my best to explain how I view the two and how I approach both as a writer (watch it will be simpler than I expect it to be).

For myself, I view plot as the overall arc of the narrative being told, and the story is the individual journey of each character.  Yep, that’s simple.

We can easily think of a series of stories, told from the perspectives of characters–major and minor–forming a greater plot.  The challenge is always balancing the rises and falls of each smaller story and how it affects the plot.  Characters should have victories and failures (otherwise we fall into the “perfect hero” cliché).

The best thing to develop as a writer is the ability to plan enough of the story(ies) to know the ending but also give enough leeway so as not to strangle the possibility of shifts to the stories or plot itself.  These can often lead to surprises that otherwise could not be planned out.  Sometimes, these surprises are amazing and other times a bit disappointing.  Early on in my writing, I noticed that I could start the story well but without a clear plot, I did not know where to go with the characters.

It’s important not to view the characters within the narrative as plot devices themselves.  Just because their stories make up the plot does not mean they are solely in the service of serving the plot.  Yes, their decisions should add context and even provide obstacles along the way but to have characters conveniently act so the plot comes together as it needs to by the conclusion is a bit a cheat and disservice to the reader.  (Hint: twists, turns, and surprises keep the reader engaged and always questioning what could be coming next.)

I believe it’s a slight slap to the readers if they are able to figure out how the plot and/or stories will conclude.  Sometimes, this is inevitable.  How many actually thought the Lord of the Rings would not end with the one ring being destroyed?  The genius of the plot is how Frodo and Gollum’s stories take turns that affect them as characters.  What are the consequences of their handling of the one ring?  This is story whereas the plot of the one ring being destroyed to destroy absolute evil can only be done by the journey of the characters involved in the common goal.

As I write and create complex characters in worlds of equal complexity, I often have to remind myself that the plot is “x” but the variables of characters (a, b, and c) make up the equation (I’m crap at “advanced” math so if I did that wrong…well, it just goes to show why I got A’s in English and Literature and C’s in algebra and all the other evil math classes I had to take).

Call to Action: Try looking at your favorite books or movies.  Can you spot where stories and plots are different?  Are there bad examples and good examples?  Share your findings!

Also, sign up for the newsletter if you haven’t yet!  The Shoals to the Hallowed short story has a title: The Queen’s Gamble.  Really excited to share the story with everyone.

Creating an Editing/Revising Plan

I try to keep my blog informative and fun but sometimes I definitely want to write more towards fellow writers or even to those who are considering taking up writing.  Whichever you are (and maybe you’re neither but still like to come by and read my beautiful words), I hope today’s post will be beneficial.

If I had to estimate, I would say 40 percent of my writing experience is creating new content.  The other 60 percent is editing and revising.  I can often come up with new ideas quickly and hash out that first rough draft quickly with all the burrs and nicks.  In my experience, editing and revising are essential steps in the process of polishing a story to be ready to read.  Big rule for writers: Don’t let anyone read your rough draft.  Just don’t.  I know you’re excited to share your recent story and want someone else to love it as much as you.  Unlikely.  Just being honest.

In reality, your rough draft is not going to be good.  It may have parts that work really well but there will be wordiness and clunky dialogue more often than not.  Unfortunately…this goes beyond the rough draft.  For the love of all things sweet and shiny, I am seeing horrible mistakes in my fourth revision of my book!  Sometimes, it takes a few attempts to really chisel, sand, and polish before your story is ready to be read by another person.

I’ve been thinking about a system for myself and my own writing when it comes to editing and revising.  What would work best as I go through the process of making it worth reading and not come away having to answer a hundred questions of why this is that or what does that mean?  After a few questions like this, you start to question whether or not you acted prematurely in your earlier years.  So, I’ll preface this plan by saying I have not followed this yet.  This is merely my plan going forward with future books I write.  (Note: This is prone to change as I go through the process.)

Start: The rough draft is the beginning–the blank canvas.  That’s blank pages being filled in with whatever the writer’s mind is creating.  Notes and little ideas of setting and characters are implemented here depending on your level of preparation.  If you outline, then it’s easier but if you prefer the “go and flow” method, then the rough draft will have a definite coarse feel to it.

1st Edit/Revision: This should be done after you’ve finished the whole story.  Beginning and end have to be in place (write down any notes of things you want to change and plan to add, adjust, or delete after the story is done).  Resist the urge to go back and make corrections to page 10 when you are on page 230.  Until then, those changes you thought of while writing the rough draft should not be implemented.  Look for any grammatical errors as well.  Do not skip these.

2nd Edit/Revision: By this time, you know the story very well.  You could probably recite the whole thing to someone.  On this pass, I start looking at details.  Look for descriptions (characters, world, culture, themes, etc.) and make sure these are consistent throughout the story.  You are layering now.

3rd Edit/Revision: Step back and don’t look at or work on the story for at least a month.  If you are on a deadline, then I recommend some look-ahead planning.  When you come back to your story, you will see things you don’t like and will want to change.  Have at it!  One thing you may notice is wordiness.  Be willing to cut where it needs to be.  Rearrange some sentences if you need to.  Make it flow!

4th Edit/Revision: Read out loud.  I’ll be honest here.  I have not done this to a great degree but as I progress forward in my own writing, I have a plan to start reading my stories out loud to myself (not another soul in earshot!).  Why do this?  Because you will notice things.  Word flow will read bloated or stuffy.  You want flow.  Whether read in your head or out loud to a room full of listeners, you want your words to be silky smooth.

5th Edit/Revision: (I know, I know.  Almost there.)  Now, you might be tired of your story.  In fact, you are going to have doubts about it.  Before you convince yourself it’s not worth the paper it’s printed on, take a breath and relax.  You’ve put in the work and it should be ready to be read by others.  Find readers.  I would recommend friends and family who will be honest with you (not always easy to do but you should have some).  Make sure to tell them they need to be honest.  They do you no favors if they tell you you’re writing is the second coming of Tolkien, Dickens, or Milton (it likely won’t be).

Finally, take whatever feedback you get and apply those changes where you deem necessary.  Sometimes, you won’t always agree with the suggestions and that’s okay.  Preferences in readers is not gospel.  Don’t let it be.

There it is.  This is my editing and revising plan for myself.  There are other details but seeing as how this is a long blog post, I’ll leave it there.  Writing requires patience, effort, discipline, and the will to finish.  Being creative is not enough.  I did not know this when I first started and discovered it along the way.

Call to Action:  If you’re a writer or want to write, I’d suggest tucking this post away for reference.  There are plenty of other writers out there with different methods and probably even wrote books on the topic.  Find what works for you and stick with it.  Make changes along the way if you need to.  If you’re another writer and stumbled over here and have different methods, please share!  I’m always looking for ways to improve.

Writing Likable Characters

posted in: Fantasy, Storytelling, Writing | 2
As I’ve stated many times, characters drive a story.  How well the characters are written can bring life to the world and the narrative.  Elements like setting, themes, plot twists, magic systems (for fantasy), etc. are all great but cannot effectively drive a story.  Readers become attached to the characters in the world in which they’re reading but if the reader struggles to care about the characters, it has to be asked if they even care what happens by the end (assuming they even reach the end)?

I’m going to take two examples of two “main” characters and delve into their likeability.  For me as a reader, I’m immediately judging whether or not I care about the character whose journey I am following.  Their personality is being revealed to me slowly, peeling away until I see the inner workings.  What are their motivations, passions, desires, fears, weaknesses, shortcomings, etc.  If I can relate in anyway, then I am definitely hooked early on.  If not, then I am reading in search of qualities I can gravitate towards and maybe empathize with.  If the character has obvious faults (selfish, conceited, proud), then I am reading in hopes that they find redemption and become a changed person whom I’m happy to see the maturation and growth of.

I’ll start with Quentin Coldwater of Lev Grossman’s book, “The Magicians”.  Quentin is a young man, looking to graduate high school and make the next step in his educational career.  He discovers that he has been selected to take a test that would–if passed–enroll him into a secret school for young magicians to learn magic and excel in the “arts”.  It’s not a unique story in itself and Quentin is somewhat the typical main protagonist.  There’s just one problem…he’s a bit of a jerk.

Now, he has not come from a loving family; his parents are often out of the country and having no real relationship with him and that seems to be the cause for much of his attitude towards others and the struggle he has to form relationships.  In this, Quentin makes friends but he really does struggle to have healthy relationships.  Most of this is the basis for his selfishness and insecurities.  Where he does excel as a character is his believability.  I know people like him.  I’ve seen them over the years and treat others as he does, followed by having to face the consequences of his choices and more often his mistakes.

I personally struggled to like Quentin throughout the first book and series (though I did finish it and even now cannot remember if his final moments mattered to me).  He has some redeeming qualities over the course of his story but his angst and “woe is me” attitude (all brought on himself by the way) drove me crazy at times.  So often I just wanted to speak to him and tell him he’s acting like a petulant child and needs to be better at life and treat others with respect and value.  (Of course, I could not do this and therefore read on, shaking my head in continual annoyance.)

Next, let’s take Tyrion Lannister of the “A Song of Ice and Fire” series by George R.R. Martin or “Game of Thrones” for TV watchers.  To put it simply, he is quite the character.  There is depth to him that is revealed in such a way that you’re continually finding yourself liking him more and more despite some of his less than admirable qualities.  He’s a lecher and drunk but loyal to his friends and family despite the latter continually regarding him (sometimes quite openly) as being only of value because he bears the family name.  You sympathize with him because you recognize his ability to possess passion for others who have endured horrible hardships.  He abhors cruelty and is not prone to hurting others (cough, cough), often believing he can use his status, knowledge, and wisdom to get the upper hand.

Tyrion goes on a whirlwind of a journey that sees him rise and fall but always remaining who he is.  Specifics would lend way to spoilers so I’ll stray from those but as a storyteller and fan of a good story, Tyrion is one of the best out there in my opinion.

The more I read, the more I recognize these characters like Tyrion who I find enjoyable and surprising despite what I might personally regard as vices in their lives.  Do the virtues outweigh those vices?  In Tyrion, I actually do think this.  He has a propensity for getting out of difficult and sometimes life-threatening situations without comprising his established character.  His sometimes heartless reactions to situations make sense and not out of left field for someone of his capability.

As a writer, I am continually thinking about my characters more than the grand plot.  Do I want to make them likeable?  Yes, but I also want them to feel real to the reader.  They cannot be perfect in every way otherwise where’s the risk and danger?  Even if the reader has a sense that some character(s) won’t die, there still needs to be this burden of wonder that something bad or even horrible can happen to them either by way of outside forces or as a result of their choice whether that choice was honorable or not.

One thing I like to ask beta readers is whether or not the characters were complex, relatable, etc. or the opposite.  Getting that feedback helps me as a writer.  As I revise, I take the time to examine every thought, word, and action of the characters to make sure they are not simply doing something for the sake of the plot.  Rather, everything they do should be based on their reaction and/or response to what is happening around them.  Writing likable characters is forever an exploration and process of becoming a better writer.

Call to Action: Are there any examples of unlikable characters you’ve read?  Or maybe ones you did like in the beginning of a book and then did not by the end?

Managing Yourself: A Simple Principle

posted in: Fantasy, Life, Writing | 0

NOTE: In light of the events in Charlottesville today, I wanted to say I wrote this blog post weeks ago.  I want to make sure that none of the language used in the my writing could be mistaken for today’s events.  I will speak to the events here and say I am appalled at the racist hate displayed and in no way condone it.  I also am surprised by some of the responses on social media as well.  To think such things do not exist shows a lack of paying attention to the space in which our country has assembled.  I am not surprised and do not condone such actions but also am not scared or worried because a small number of hateful people decide to rally.  The small number of participants should remind us all that there are far more who do not stand with the hateful.  Those of us who choose to love our fellow men no matter color, culture, political side, and/or religious beliefs far outnumber the few who embrace hate in their hearts.

As strange as it is and this being my blog, everything stated is my own opinion and based on my experiences, convictions, beliefs, and research into various topics.  I know, you read that first sentence and think, “Oh boy, where’s this going?”  I try to keep this blog grounded in writing and whatever influences I have in my journey.

However, I have noticed something in recent months that has me somewhat concerned but not apprehensive in my pursuit for traditional publishing.  Just some thoughts I’ve been wanting to share.

Twitter is quite the social media tool/outlet to connect with all kinds of people from all kinds of walks of life.  I’ve been able to follow, interact, and have discussions with unpublished and published authors, editors, agents, and others in the book industry.  This has been a fun experience for me and allows me to ask questions, find resources, and even form acquaintance-like relationships.

In spite of all this, though, I also come up against some things that flash warning signs.  Now, I’m approaching this carefully because I don’t want to offend or stir anything.  If this blog post leads to anything, I hope its respectful dialogue.  I have no interest in debating or converting for any purpose.  I want to share some concerns.

If you are unaware (I seriously don’t know how that could be) but there are a lot of dividing lines right now in the US.  Politics, religion, and even sports produce some really nasty things “said” about and to people who may not share the same views.  Now, I could unfollow those who have these different views from me but I honestly like to read what people are saying so I understand where they’re coming from.

My chief concern though when it comes to the writing industry is will I be ignored or attacked if I don’t share the same views so openly expressed?

I do not get political or even religious on social media.  I follow many people who I share different views than and read things every day I do not agree with.  However, I have and hold to a position that I cannot manage anyone but myself.  It’s not easy but it’s a great discipline to have.  Others are very open about their anger and sometimes hate of other people and this makes me wonder if I will be “denied” opportunities if I disagree with those who hold the keys.  I think it’s a legitimate concern for me to have but at the same time I trust that my writing and storytelling abilities will supersede any disagreements.

If I could offer any kind of advice (totally up to you if you want to follow it or not; you won’t offend me if you don’t or call me a name), it would be that I think people need to be careful of vitriol espoused on social media.  Not because you’ll offend someone but because people like me will wonder, “Can I have any kind of relationship with this person if they find out I don’t share the same views as them?”

The writing community is a unique place in that there’s usually a lot of support and few “rivalries”.  When writers announce their successes, I see way more support and congratulations than the opposite.  There may be jealousy but that drives a lot of writers to believe they can be the next one to sign that book deal contract.

However, and I’ve seen this a lot in recent weeks, there are writers and agents that are extremely hostile and sometimes plain disgusting with what they say in response to something outside of writing that they are upset over.  I get it.  There are things that drive me up the wall and boil my blood as well but I don’t think it’s worth my time or effort to say anything on a social platform (part of me doesn’t think anyone cares anyway).

Obviously, I am not saying this sort of behavior should be stopped.  Far from it actually.  Speak and be heard but I know there are consequences for saying things.  For me, I never want to jeopardize future relationships because of a quick response born out of anger or offense.  As I stated before, I can only manage myself and I want to always be mindful of how my words affect not only others but myself in the grand scheme of things.

Call to Action: Now I don’t know if my concerns are legitimate or not but I’ll probably share stories once I get deeper into the agent/publishing levels.  Until then, sign up for the newsletter!  (Yes, you’ll see this push throughout the month.)

On This Day: 09 August – Book Lovers Day

posted in: Fantasy, On This Day, Reading | 2
I was doing some research and found that today is Book Lovers Day.  Well, how could I resist doing a blog post about that!Apparently, the day encourages people to relax with a book and reading to your heart’s content.  Unfortunately, this day falls in the middle of the week and so I’m at work.  That does not mean I will not go the day without reading (I have a personal goal to read 20-30 pages a day and usually meet it).

So, my encouragement to everyone today is to take the book you’re reading or maybe find a new book to read and take some time in a quiet place, get some coffee or tea, and read in peace.  Go a step further and put your phone on silent and in the other room.  Remove distractions for a decent hour at least.

I admit, sometimes I wish our connectivity through technology could be set back a decade or two.  Since that’s not possible, it comes down to our having to be proactive and turn off the connectivity manually.  I mean to do this more, especially on the weekends.  There’s something about reading a book (not an ebook) that is comforting to me.  I think it’s important not to lose this odd connection of immersion into fiction or nonfiction (whatever your preference).

Call to Action:  Do yourself some good peace and quiet and enjoy a book today.  Don’t feel pressured to read a certain amount of pages or chapters.  Just read to your heart’s content.  Share with me what you’re reading too!

2nd 2017 Newsletter Coming Soon!

posted in: Newsletter, Review, Writing | 0
Shameless plug time.  The second newsletter of the year will be sent out the 31st of August.  If you haven’t signed up, I hope you will.  Like last time, it will follow the same format sharing where I’m at in the progress of the Ravanguard series, book reviews, and best of all: a short story from the Shoals to the Hallowed series.

Just to reiterate, if you’re caught up on the Shoals to the Hallowed flash fiction posts at the end of each month, this short story will take place in the same timeline.  It will feature the Wielder, Delya Glassene, who was introduced in the “Binding Sleight” flash fiction post back in February.  As I write the short story, I am excited to say that it will give some context to the world and main plot points.  I’ve enjoyed writing these stories and plan to continue to do so for all of you.

If you know others who might like the series, then feel free to share the previous posts.  It won’t take long to catch up and there’s plenty of time to sign up and receive all the content so you don’t miss any of the story.  I make no promises to release the short stories from the newsletter any time soon.  I’d like to keep and maintain some exclusivity.

So, if I’ve intrigued you at all, hopefully you will sign up when prompted on the website.  You can also go to the contact form and request to be added to the newsletter list there.

Another quick little tease for you.  I will be announcing a big thing I’ll be doing with the blog for the month of October.  Let’s just say it will be strange but an awesome thing for me to write about for that month that will require preparation but full of good stuff.

If you did not receive the first newsletter but signed up, please let me know and I’ll get that out to you.  As always, thanks for dropping by and reading!

Call to Action: For anyone who has received the first newsletter, feel free to leave a comment here if you have any feedback.

Wordiness:  Too Many Too Few

As I revise, I am becoming more aware of the things I do wrong as a writer.  Some of this is chalked up to my first draftiness (ah, fun word play) but as I work on my fifth revision, I have to consider my growth and maturing as a writer.  Today, let’s talk about my being too wordy.

First drafts (in my experience) are serious word vomit sessions where I seem to just pour it on and on because I’m still telling myself the story.  That’s what first drafts are: the writer telling the story to themselves first.  Each subsequent draft of the story should be less of this.  Those drafts need to be approached with the attitude of, “Now I know what the story is so I need to whittle it down for others.”  When I use the word “whittle”, I do not mean to dumb it down.  Far from it, since I believe when revising, the story should be sharpened.  Each sentence should be put to the whetstone until there’s a fine edge.  No burrs or dullness.

For myself, I am revising my book to the point where I am making sure redundancy and over-description are being removed.  I am looking weak verbs like: are, was, is, etc.  Why say someone is running when saying they ran or rushed is stronger?  I am looking for word flow.  As I mentioned in my previous post about word count, I can honestly say my book is not lacking in the word count department, but to cut away the fat is necessary.

C.S. Lewis said, “Don’t say it was delightful; make us say delightful when we’ve read the description. You see, all those words (horrifying, wonderful, hideous, exquisite) are only like saying to your readers, ‘Please will you do the job for me.’”  This and other quotes about writing and being a functional wordsmith continue to linger in my mind.  Writers should strive to evoke and stir the emotions of the readers, remembering to show them what is happening in the story.

Call to Action: Newsletter plug time!  If you haven’t signed up for my newsletter, definitely do so.  Not only will it have exclusive info about myself since the last newsletter and some book reviews, but you will also get the Shoals to the Hallowed short story that will close some gaps and provide context to the flash fiction series.