Flash Fiction: “The Bloody Dove”

Chasiel stopped and stepped backwards to look down the narrow street deep in the Weavers Ward in the city of Khamda.  Night cast shadows all about the mottled-stone corridor but she could see the two men easily enough.

Smoke from her exhale curled around her face, pipe bowl glowing as she sucked in soon after.  A hum of sound in her throat followed.

The men faced each other, one slapping at the other in obvious intimidation fashion.  Chasiel would never think to intervene in such a common scene in the gloomy wards of Khamda but the slapping man’s attire drew her attention upon recognition.

Smoke continued to drift from her mouth and caress her face as she approached the abuser and his victim.  The sweet scent of the sigda leaf filled her nostrils.

“Help!” the bloody-faced man cried, hands raised to protect his face from further injury.  Common by his appearance, he did wear at his waist one of the leather kits used by runners to keep writing supplies on hand and ready at a moments notice.

With a twist, the other man turned to see who approached, as Chasiel did not change her footing to a quieter step.  Dark hair and beard hid his features but the three intersecting silver rings sewed into the sleeves of his jerkin marked him a mercenary belonging to the Silver Way Band.  “What’s this–”

His question could not be finished as Chasiel lashed out with a combination of punches to his lower back, aiming for the kidneys, and finishing with a grab and throw technique she had recently learned from Fenroe who would receive a well-deserved “thank you” the next time they saw each other.

The bruised runner trembled in shock at witnessing his attacker being bested by a woman no doubt.  Once he came to his senses, he began to sputter thanks.

Chasiel waved him off.  “Give me whatever contract he had been offered.”

The man winced.  “What?”

She blew smoke in his face, ignoring his coughing.  “The contract.  Give it here.”  She snapped her fingers at him.  The humming sound in her throat followed and the runner’s eyes widened before dropping to her throat where he finally noticed her choker and the pendant that rested cold against her skin.

“Damned whore,” the Silver Way mercenary growled as he rose to his feet, still in pain but reaching for a dagger at his waist.

Chasiel reacted in kind, pipe stem pinched between her teeth, as her hands shot for the hooked blades sheathed behind her back.

Dead men screamed, grunted, and/or pissed themselves when the clutches of the Hallowed seized their soul.  Men of the infamous Silver Way were no different.  Blood flew from her slashes and pooled on the old cobbles at her feet.

“The Bloody Dove,” the runner whispered.

Chasiel nodded.  “I’ll have that contract.  Then you can go.”  Placed in her outstretched hand, she unrolled the thin paper and read, finding the details both interesting and enticing.  “Hallowed be Praised,” she said through smoke and leaving the runner alone with the dead.

Flash Fiction: “Separate From the Sorrows”

 

Gasping breath invaded his stinging lungs, feet slipping on the glass-formed ground where the Shoalway opened for him to exit the harsh environment of his Shoal, Qorum.  Always, the elements of the other realm challenged his body and mind–still in ways the scholars and Wielders did not fully understand.

His wounds required attention.  Cuts stung, slashes needed sutures and burns demanded salves.  The Wielder, Damrin Graeves, surveyed his body wherever the pain emitted from, revealed by the rips and singed parts of his once fine clothing.  The fight had been unexpected.  His hands shook, fingers clenched into hard fists.  Tears streamed from his eyes down his cheeks, stinging throughout their trails.  Not from the pain–no–but from the betrayal he had just survived.

There in the abandoned courtyard of stone and overgrowth in the dead city of Hasselor, Kesree baited him repeatedly like a man mad with deceptive intent.  His vile words, lined with poison, echoed in Damrin’s mind.  His friend…one of many years since they first encountered one another in the Wielder’s Congress.  How had it all unraveled like frayed rope?

Damrin dug his fingers into the dirt of the field outside the capital city of Talloe of the Hold, Teras.  Birds sang beautifully around him, mocking his heartbreak.  Kesree had managed to slip away to his Shoal but he could not have lived.  The wounds he had suffered were far worse–fatal to the body.  Passing through the Shoalway to wherever he ended up in the world was a desperate risk.  The Shoals did not coddle or pity the Wielders able to bridge the world by their power.

Losing his dear friend would leave a wound that would never heal but the confrontation between them was a slow-moving agony.  The betrayal drove his thoughts to consider the turn of events.  If Wielders were turning against one another, then war was surely churned up in the garden of peace.  He had to seek out allies, but knew the chance of further deception was likely.  He needed his mind and body to be healed completely, forcing himself to be ready in an instant.

A small opening to his Shoalway appeared before him, earth melting to glass underneath.  He gazed into the portal, able to look through the haze of power to an atmosphere of peril.  Even a small opening was large enough to let out some of the most dangerous threats that dwelled within Qorum.  But he needed it open.  Only then could he draw out the current of power, healing his wounds.

Flash Fiction: “God’s Bones”

The smoldering corpse lay just outside the center of the destroyed thicket.  The melted ground a foot from the body’s collapsed position revealed it to be a man or woman possessed prior of great power.  The Ajjuun had no name for these things but the whispers of “gods” did come from time to time.

Hijeneva ground her teeth while waiting in the humidity.  Signs of the early morning duel could not be ignored.  The trees and vegetation bore singed ends and deep cuts from unfamiliar weapons. She watched the young man–brave and bold–begin his attempt forward.

Imko’s first few steps boasted courage, produced by confidence none of the young warriors in the thicket lacked.  Why would they not?  The bodies of their dead brothers, sisters and friends who had tried to approach the corpse at all different angles did not find death until they crossed an invisible threshold some few feet away from the looting opportunity.

Nine had died so far.  Imko would be the tenth though none would warn him to avoid the fatal fate.  To do so was against the ways of the Ajjuun.  Bravery was never questioned aloud but in her head, Hijeneva begged him to stop.

Perhaps it was bravery that made Imko refuse to stop at the line and consider another option.  Perhaps it was his desire to impress them all and secure a wife for his next name day.  Perhaps, it was the will of the fallen god.

Imko stopped in mid-step and his body jerked violently until he spasmed so hard an audible snap of bones drowned out his scream.  Far before he fell to the ground, the tenth of them died.

Hijeneva’s heart tweaked in pain, the loss of another–a friend–was never as simple as the death itself.  Her aversion to look upon the fresh corpse of Imko drew her gaze upwards where she could see the overhanging branches of the hosta tree.  Strong and able to hold a grown man’s weight, they extended all the way to where the god lay.  A wall could not be pushed through but it could be cleared.

The fathers and mothers who waited back in the tent grounds did so in anticipation.  Did they know or fear their children died within the crucible?  Would there be crying?  Or would the way of stone be practiced even then?  She could hear the names of their own gods being cursed for their cruelty, unafraid of being stricken with sickness or drought.  The Ajjuun may be considered primal by many in the world of the civilized Holds but they were not denied the capacity to challenge the highest of powers that governed their loyalty and worship.

Hijeneva spoke a prayer in the waning silence.  Someone would announce their intent to follow Imko and she knew it had to be her.  To save the lives of those remaining, to scavenge what could be potentially invaluable to their survival in the days to come and–least important to her–to attract the eyes of a suitable husband.

“I’ll go,” she declared, plan barely formed but knowing her attempt might be what was needed to collect the god’s bones.

Flash Fiction: “Binding Slight”

The strolling occupants of the corridors and stairwells separated at the sight of the general–a salmon swimming against the current.  His cape flowed like a whipped flag in the high winds of the Mestansa Sea.  All eyes avoided his, not daring to touch upon the war-battered irises of a Battle Lord.Oran Ki’Tanil barely took notice of the man struggling to stay beside him.  The flow of traffic did not pay him any mind.

“It’s true then?” asked Dhamsho Hivin, a treasurer to the Hold of Breshtk.  “You spoke to the sole survivor.”  Not a question–a realization.

Oran frowned, saying nothing, refusing to until he stood in the Observum atop the capital conservatory.  His mind flooded with each step, forming plans along with responses and questions.  Scenarios of the most dire brood hatched from their shells of fear and worry.  Duty called him to action but he feared what that entailed both for the people of Breshtk and his thousands of soldiers.

The Observum’s domed architecture spun with the powers manifested from the Shoal to the Hallowed called Fensaeng.  Its Wielder, Delya Glassene, wrapped in her green robes pinned tightly by silver crystals turned to him as he entered but said nothing.  Somewhere along the way, the treasurer had broken away, not daring to enter the room filled with Shoal power.

In front of the Wielder shone a suspended viewer with its twelve glass sides, able to be rotated at will by her alone in order to look upon other places in the world.  An orb for spying on their would-be allies.  Had news reached the other Holds?  How long before messages would be received to offer condolences?

Oran did not trust the use of such power but put aside his prejudices, settled now for the first time in his life to seek the aid of a Wielder.  The shivering across his teeth could be ignored for the time being.  That could not be avoided by anyone unless they were a Wielder themselves.  “It’s true,” he told Delya.

She watched the current side of the viewer where a bird’s eye view of the capital city of Charun, pressed in to the compound grounds of the Hold’s military.  Hundreds of men stood in perfect lines at attention while an imposing figure sat upon a warhorse addressing his soldiers in vigorous speech.  Sound did not come through the viewer, something that Oran would have preferred.  Alas, he had little knowledge and understanding of the Shoals and their power.

“Wielder Glassene,” Oran said, attempting to gain her full attention.  “The heirs of the Breshtk Hold are dead.  Such acts…  Another Wielder has broken the Hold’s Treaty–”

“You should seek allies, General Ki’Tanil.”  She moved her hands in front of the viewer, rotating it slowly so Oran could bear witness to multiple Hold armies assembled in what appeared to be war preparations.  “We will need the best defense possible if the other Holds move against us.”

Knees close to buckling, Oran Ki’Tanil, Battle Lord of the Breshtk Hold, whispered a prayer to the Hallowed for help he doubted would come.

Flash Fiction: “Dousing of the Bonds”


Hail peppered the wet earth along the country highway, afternoon light dismissed by the thickened fog wall ringing the guards and carriage.  Past the barrier, a sun-soaked path teased what could be.  Pine and birch alike stood at the outer edge of the cold mist, forced to bear witness to the attack.

The falling ice pinged off the battered armor of the five remaining guards, their breaths fast and hard, waiting for the next onslaught of their hidden foe.  Puddles rippled, blood and mud mixed in a sickly color, where the bodies of the fallen lay in wait for a burial unlikely to come.

Barston checked his leg but knew it was either fractured or a clean break.  He thanked the Hallowed that the bone did not jut from his flesh.  The deep cold of the circle stung his skin, steel of his chain mail biting.  Clouds of his breath seemed to crystalize in the air in front of him.

Whimpers from within the carriage, front wheels shattered to splinters, pulled him back to the fray.  The desire to tell the boys inside to flee the scene pecked at him but that just promised a sooner death for both.  His fingers brushed frost from the mark on the carriage door.  Blood froze in long trails against the sigil of House Fellel.

He would have asked Jaers what they should do but his friend lay three feet away, having bled out minutes ago.  Who still lived?  Every movement was a struggle.  “Krin,” he chattered through the deepening cold.

“Shut your teeth!” came a desperate, fearful response.

The bridgeway from the Shoals to the Hallowed had opened near them so quickly and without warning that none of the twelve guards could have reacted in their favor.  Whoever the attacking Wielder was, they knew a war would follow in direct response to his or her treachery.

A shiver spread through Barston’s teeth starting at the molars to the front before the strikes came.  Screams followed as he twisted around, propped against the carriage, sword hilt frozen in his gauntleted hand.  One by one, needles and corkscrews of ice pierced frost-bitten flesh, finding the gaps between steel and mail.

The twist of fear, urged him to run away but the pain searing through his leg drove him to unconsciousness after two steps, falling face down into the puddle of Jaers’ blood.

Breath came like an icy wind, his chest heaving in pain.  His bones and muscles numb, skin near blue.

The Wielder stood over him, pleased at his atrocity–an artist convinced of a masterpiece.  Arcane armor covered him from head to toe.  Etchings of symbols twisted throughout while quiet prayers broke from his lips, hidden by helm and visor.  Dark eyes turned to regard Barston.  “You will remain alive to tell the tale,” he said before Barston fell unconscious again, wishing only to die.